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Related Resources

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ARTICLE_DATE July, 09 2011 08:58:00
ARTICLE_DATE_STR 20110709
ARTICLE_DESCRIPTION This June marked the arrival of two newcomers to the periodic table of elements. If you haven’t given the table a second thought since chemistry class you may be surprised to find out what it takes to make the cut.
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ARTICLE_TEXT <p>Although the <a href="http://periodic.lanl.gov/index.shtml">periodic table</a> might seem stale, scientists have discovered about one-hundred new elements in the last 250 years. However, the last naturally-occurring element on the periodic table is element 92, Uranium. The rest, beginning with Neptunium's discovery&nbsp;in 1940, are artificially-created elements produced by scientists in high-energy particle accelerators. So it is with the newest additions, Elements 114 and 116.&nbsp;</p> <p>A team made up of Russian and U.S. scientists discovered the <a href="http://www.iupac.org/web/nt/2011-06-01_elements_114_116">new elements</a> by smashing atoms of calcium with atoms of plutonium and curium (a process known as cross-bombardment) to create 114 and 116 respectively. Unlike most naturally occurring elements, artificially made elements (also known as transuranium elements) are radioactive and break down extremely quickly. Neither new element exists for more than a few seconds before decaying.</p> <p><br /> The next step for the new elements will be the assignment of permanent names. The discovering scientists will have the privilege of choosing the new monikers and&nbsp;immortalizing their finds, which will end in &ldquo;-ium&rdquo;, for a new generation of chemistry students.</p> <p>Learn more&nbsp;by checking out the following titles from the Springfield-Greene County Library:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://coolcat.org/record=b1990991~S1">The Ingredients: A Guided Tour of the Elements</a> by Paul Strathern</li> <li><a href="http://coolcat.org/record=b2109938~S1">Essential Elements: Atoms, Quarks, and the Periodic Table</a> by Matt Tweed</li> <li><a href="http://coolcat.org/record=b2113957~S1">A Well-Ordered Thing: Dmitrii Mendeleev and the Shadow of the Periodic Table</a> by Michael D. Gordin</li> <li><a href="http://coolcat.org/record=b2499943~S1">The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe</a> by Theodore Gray</li> </ul> <p><br /> &nbsp;</p>
ARTICLE_TITLE Periodic Updates
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Science

Periodic Updates

Although the periodic table might seem stale, scientists have discovered about one-hundred new elements in the last 250 years. However, the last naturally-occurring element on the periodic table is element 92, Uranium. The rest, beginning with Neptunium's discovery in 1940, are artificially-created elements produced by scientists in high-energy particle accelerators. So it is with the newest additions, Elements 114 and 116. 

A team made up of Russian and U.S. scientists discovered the new elements by smashing atoms of calcium with atoms of plutonium and curium (a process known as cross-bombardment) to create 114 and 116 respectively. Unlike most naturally occurring elements, artificially made elements (also known as transuranium elements) are radioactive and break down extremely quickly. Neither new element exists for more than a few seconds before decaying.


The next step for the new elements will be the assignment of permanent names. The discovering scientists will have the privilege of choosing the new monikers and immortalizing their finds, which will end in “-ium”, for a new generation of chemistry students.

Learn more by checking out the following titles from the Springfield-Greene County Library:


 


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