All Library branches will be closed and the Mobile Library will not make its regularly scheduled stops on Monday, May 29, for Memorial Day.

The Library Center and Schweitzer Brentwood branch libraries will not have phone service Monday, May 29-Tuesday, May 30, due to maintenance. Please call (417) 865-1340 for assistance.

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Related Resources

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ARTICLE_DATE June, 25 2013 00:00:00
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ARTICLE_DESCRIPTION &nbsp;The effort to reduce, reuse and recycle everything possible from an empty Library property is nearly complete, as the Brentwood Branch renovation plans move forward.<br />
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ARTICLE_TEXT <p><img alt=" Recycling project for Brentwood Branch renovation." src="/blogs/userfiles/research/images/resized/IMG_2656_225x169.JPG" style="float:left; margin-left:11px; margin-right:11px;" title=" Recycling project for Brentwood Branch renovation." />We&rsquo;re one important step further on the timeline for the Brentwood Branch Library renovation project. Our whole-house recycling project is nearly complete, and the Library is pursuing rezoning of the property with the City of Springfield.</p> <p>&nbsp;Through a first-ever partnership with Habitat for Humanity and Ozarks Green Building Coalition, community volunteers have &ldquo;deconstructed&rdquo; the house at 1911 E. Wayland Drive to make way for the Brentwood work. Our shared goal was to reclaim, reuse or recycle every possible building material, inside and out, so that others could benefit from the materials, the Library could reduce demolition and hauling costs, and the Library would limit what ultimately went to the landfill.</p> <p>The deconstruction, reuse and recycling of an entire house are valuable for another reason: They can help the Library&rsquo;s effort to achieve LEED certification for the renovation project. Building to LEED certification standards can help the Library save energy costs and create a comfortable, eco-conscious space for our visitors!</p> <p>Untreated framing lumber, windows, doors, hardware, light fixtures, cabinets and even the backyard deck were sold for reuse. Other items were reclaimed for recycling, including some plumbing, electrical wiring, duct work, attic material, shingles, metal siding and metal duct work. Any unfinished/untreated wood can be recycled as mulch.</p> <p>Many of the interior materials were sold in an April yard sale on the site, with about $1,400 in proceeds going to Ozarks Green Building. The exterior items were recycled by private firms, reused by Habitat or are now for sale at Habitat&rsquo;s ReStore, which will benefit from the proceeds. The Library has contracted with a local firm to remove the concrete foundation and driveway on the site and grind it up for construction fill at local projects.</p> <p>&ldquo;It goes back in ground, but it has a purpose when it goes back in the ground,&rdquo; said Chris Houghton, Habitat for Humanity&rsquo;s director of operations.</p> <p>The Library bought the Wayland Drive property just east of the Brentwood Branch in August 2012. The extra space will provide room for staff parking on the east side of the library. And that will bring a welcome addition &ndash; more parking at the front entrance for library visitors. Some visitors won&rsquo;t have to park their cars though &ndash; they&rsquo;ll have the convenience of a new drive-up service window on the east side of the building.</p> <p>Once the lot on Wayland is cleared, the Library will grade, seed, mow and maintain the lot until the project moves forward.</p> <p>The Library Foundation will manage a capital campaign for the estimated $2.5 million upgrade of Brentwood, built in 1971. A timeline for the project has not been set.</p> <p>&nbsp;Ozarks Green Building President Zack Miller summed up the deconstruction project best: &ldquo;From a public point of view, what else would make sense? We can do it for less than the cost of demolishing it and throwing it in the landfill. It&rsquo;s a win-win. There is a social responsibility.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
ARTICLE_TITLE Brentwood Branch Renovation Timeline Moves Ahead
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Schweitzer Brentwood

Brentwood Branch Renovation Timeline Moves Ahead

 Recycling project for Brentwood Branch renovation.We’re one important step further on the timeline for the Brentwood Branch Library renovation project. Our whole-house recycling project is nearly complete, and the Library is pursuing rezoning of the property with the City of Springfield.

 Through a first-ever partnership with Habitat for Humanity and Ozarks Green Building Coalition, community volunteers have “deconstructed” the house at 1911 E. Wayland Drive to make way for the Brentwood work. Our shared goal was to reclaim, reuse or recycle every possible building material, inside and out, so that others could benefit from the materials, the Library could reduce demolition and hauling costs, and the Library would limit what ultimately went to the landfill.

The deconstruction, reuse and recycling of an entire house are valuable for another reason: They can help the Library’s effort to achieve LEED certification for the renovation project. Building to LEED certification standards can help the Library save energy costs and create a comfortable, eco-conscious space for our visitors!

Untreated framing lumber, windows, doors, hardware, light fixtures, cabinets and even the backyard deck were sold for reuse. Other items were reclaimed for recycling, including some plumbing, electrical wiring, duct work, attic material, shingles, metal siding and metal duct work. Any unfinished/untreated wood can be recycled as mulch.

Many of the interior materials were sold in an April yard sale on the site, with about $1,400 in proceeds going to Ozarks Green Building. The exterior items were recycled by private firms, reused by Habitat or are now for sale at Habitat’s ReStore, which will benefit from the proceeds. The Library has contracted with a local firm to remove the concrete foundation and driveway on the site and grind it up for construction fill at local projects.

“It goes back in ground, but it has a purpose when it goes back in the ground,” said Chris Houghton, Habitat for Humanity’s director of operations.

The Library bought the Wayland Drive property just east of the Brentwood Branch in August 2012. The extra space will provide room for staff parking on the east side of the library. And that will bring a welcome addition – more parking at the front entrance for library visitors. Some visitors won’t have to park their cars though – they’ll have the convenience of a new drive-up service window on the east side of the building.

Once the lot on Wayland is cleared, the Library will grade, seed, mow and maintain the lot until the project moves forward.

The Library Foundation will manage a capital campaign for the estimated $2.5 million upgrade of Brentwood, built in 1971. A timeline for the project has not been set.

 Ozarks Green Building President Zack Miller summed up the deconstruction project best: “From a public point of view, what else would make sense? We can do it for less than the cost of demolishing it and throwing it in the landfill. It’s a win-win. There is a social responsibility.”

 


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