All Library branches will be closed and the Mobile Library will not make its regularly scheduled stops on Monday, May 29, for Memorial Day.

The Library Center and Schweitzer Brentwood branch libraries will not have phone service Monday, May 29-Tuesday, May 30, due to maintenance. Please call (417) 865-1340 for assistance.

array
1
struct
ICON_URL /images/research/topics/business.gif
LABEL_ID 46
LABEL_NAME Business
LABEL_URL business.cfm

Related Resources

struct
ARTICLE
array
1
struct
ARTICLE_DATE March, 18 2009 00:01:00
ARTICLE_DATE_STR 20090318
ARTICLE_DESCRIPTION <p>The feasibility of Missouri wind power</p>
ARTICLE_ID 278
ARTICLE_STATUS published
ARTICLE_TEXT <p>The idea of a Missouri community producing 123% of its residential electrical demand using wind power is far from a futuristic pipe dream.&nbsp; It's been happening for about a year now, making <a href="http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/04/home-residential-wind-power-rock-port-missouri.php">Rock Port</a> the first US community to be fully powered by the wind.<br /><br /><a href="http://www.dnr.mo.gov/energy/renewables/wind-energy.htm">Wind speed maps</a> make it clear that significant portions of Missouri have little potential for wind energy production.&nbsp; In fact, only 34 (or 30%)&nbsp;of Missouri's 115 counties have real potential.&nbsp; Economically strapped northwest Missouri shows the greatest potential, given today's technology.<br /><br />After reaching 1,000 megawatts (MW)&nbsp;of wind energy capacity&nbsp;in 1985, it took <a href="http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/">the nation</a> more than a decade&nbsp;to reach the 2,000 MW mark in 1999.&nbsp; Since then installed capacity has reached 26,274 MW (as of 31 Jan 09).&nbsp; As new technology comes online, <a href="http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/astate_template.asp?stateab=mo">Missouri</a>'s late start and presently limited <a href="http://www.nationalwind.org/pdf/MatchettBarry.pdf">output</a> (163 MW with a capacity potential of 5,960 MW) may be able to be overcome.</p>
ARTICLE_TITLE An Electricity Answer Blowin' in the Wind
ARTICLE_TYPE_ID 1
ARTICLE_TYPE_NAME Article
ARTICLE_YEAR_MONTH_STR 200903
NEW_USERID 7
PAGENAME article.cfm
USERFNAME Mike
USERID 8
USERNAME undefined
USER_FNAME Mike
USER_LOGIN mikedep
COMMENTS
array [empty]
LABELS
array
1
struct
ARTICLE_ID 278
GROUPDIR research
GROUP_ID 83
GROUP_NAME Research
ICON_URL /images/research/topics/business.gif
LABEL_ID 46
LABEL_NAME Business
LABEL_URL business.cfm
LINKS
array [empty]
Business

An Electricity Answer Blowin' in the Wind

The idea of a Missouri community producing 123% of its residential electrical demand using wind power is far from a futuristic pipe dream.  It's been happening for about a year now, making Rock Port the first US community to be fully powered by the wind.

Wind speed maps make it clear that significant portions of Missouri have little potential for wind energy production.  In fact, only 34 (or 30%) of Missouri's 115 counties have real potential.  Economically strapped northwest Missouri shows the greatest potential, given today's technology.

After reaching 1,000 megawatts (MW) of wind energy capacity in 1985, it took the nation more than a decade to reach the 2,000 MW mark in 1999.  Since then installed capacity has reached 26,274 MW (as of 31 Jan 09).  As new technology comes online, Missouri's late start and presently limited output (163 MW with a capacity potential of 5,960 MW) may be able to be overcome.


Find this article at

Free wi-fi

Friends of the library

The Library Foundation

Bookmark and Share

Sign up for the newsletter

© Springfield-Greene County Library District