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ARTICLE_DATE January, 14 2014 11:55:00
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ARTICLE_DESCRIPTION <img width="20%" vspace="1" hspace="4" height="20%" align="left" title=" " alt=" " src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a9/Heubach_dog_skull.jpg" /><span style="font-size: 12px;">Recent research sheds light on the origin of the domestic dog.</span>
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ARTICLE_TEXT <p>The evolutionary history of the domestic dog is something of a mystery. Our ancient ancestors domesticated many different species of wild beast and the vast majority of them were animals that provided food. Dogs, in contrast, are the only large carnivore humans have domesticated. In an attempt to shed some light on how and why this happened, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131114142134.htm">researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles</a> looked at the DNA of 18 specimen between 1000 and 30,000 years old. The results: that cute little Yorkie on the couch is probably a descendant of an extinct species of Pleistocene wolf.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>&nbsp;Websites:</b></p> <ul> <li><a target="_blank" style="text-decoration:none;" href="http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131114142134.htm"><span style="font-size: 13px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: underline; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Dogs Likely Originated in Europe More Than 18,000 Years Ago, Biologists Report</span></a></li> <li><a target="_blank" style="text-decoration:none;" href="http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/library/01/5/l_015_02.html"><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; text-decoration: underline; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Evolution of the Dog</span></a></li> <li><a target="_blank" style="text-decoration:none;" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/13/130514-dogs-domestication-humans-genome-science/"><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; text-decoration: underline; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Dog and Human Genomes Evolved Together</span></a></li> <li><a target="_blank" style="text-decoration:none;" href="http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/node/2323"><span style="font-size: 13px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: underline; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Dog Breeding: Canine Evolutionary History and Implications for Human Genetics</span></a></li> </ul> <p><b>Books:</b></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://coolcat.org/record=b2375298~S1"><img vspace="1" hspace="4" align="left" title=" " alt=" " src="http://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=9780061132599/SC.GIF&amp;client=sprgr&amp;type=springimage" />Dogs: A Natural History</a>, by Jake Page<br /> Page looks at dogs' wild brothers, the wolves, and their closer cousins, the wild or pariah dogs; explains the newest theory of how dogs were domesticated; describes a dog's development from puppyhood on; and finally ponders a dog's emotional life and intelligence.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;</p> <p><img vspace="1" hspace="4" align="left" title=" " alt=" " src="http://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=0865476314 /SC.GIF&amp;client=sprgr&amp;type=springimage" /></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://coolcat.org/record=b2151773~S1">A Dog's History of America: How Our Best Friend Explored, Conquered, and Settled a Continent</a>, by Mark Derr<br /> In this remarkable history of the interaction between humans and dogs, Derr looks at the ways in which we have used canines -- as sled dogs and sheepdogs, hounds and service dogs, show dogs and bomb-sniffing dogs -- as he tracks changes in American culture and society.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> &nbsp;<br /> <img vspace="1" hspace="4" align="left" title=" " alt=" " src="http://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=0887765890 /SC.GIF&amp;client=sprgr&amp;type=springimage" /><a target="_blank" href="http://coolcat.org/record=b2088072~S1">Working Like a Dog: The Story of Working Dogs through History</a>, by Gena Gorrell<br /> Since the early Stone Age, our lives and the lives of dogs have been interwoven. This fascinating book describes the dogs of history, the evolution of breeds for different purposes and the training involved in preparing the modern-day heroes who find lost children, nab criminals and point out contraband.</p> <p><b>&nbsp;<br /> E-books:</b></p> <p><img vspace="1" hspace="4" align="left" title=" " alt=" " src="http://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=9781426210464 /SC.GIF&amp;client=sprgr&amp;type=springimage" /><a target="_blank" href="http://coolcat.org/record=b2753965~S1">Dogs: A Short History from Wolf to Woof</a>* <br /> Three riveting essays by some of National Geographic magazine's most highly esteemed writers explore the canine-human relationship and what scientists are learning from dogs. Filled with amazing facts, colorful anecdotes and accessible science, this e-book provides a fascinating guide to some of the world's most beloved creatures.<br /> &nbsp;</p> <p><b>Streaming Media from Hoopla:</b></p> <p><img width="88" vspace="1" hspace="4" height="125" align="left" title=" " alt=" " src="/blogs/userfiles/default/images/resized/ngo_x20361_thumbnail_88x125.jpeg" /><a target="blank" href="https://www.hoopladigital.com/title/11017244">Science of Dogs</a>*<br /> This National Geographic documentary looks at man's evolutionary manipulation of dogs' appearance, talents and temperament &ndash; and the accelerating efforts to create breeds to suit our needs.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img width="124" vspace="1" hspace="4" height="103" align="left" title=" " alt=" " src="/blogs/userfiles/default/images/resized/ttm_9781400193400_thumbnail_125x103.jpeg" /><a target="blank" href="https://www.hoopladigital.com/title/10755495">The Wolf in the Parlor: The Eternal Connection Between Humans and Dogs</a>*<br /> Dogs are everywhere, but how much do we really know about where they came from and the implications of their place in our world? In this audiobook, Franklin recounts his findings from a decade spent studying the origins and significance of the dog and its peculiar attachment to humans.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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Science

What is the Origin of that Doggie in the Window?

The evolutionary history of the domestic dog is something of a mystery. Our ancient ancestors domesticated many different species of wild beast and the vast majority of them were animals that provided food. Dogs, in contrast, are the only large carnivore humans have domesticated. In an attempt to shed some light on how and why this happened, researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles looked at the DNA of 18 specimen between 1000 and 30,000 years old. The results: that cute little Yorkie on the couch is probably a descendant of an extinct species of Pleistocene wolf.

 

 Websites:

Books:

 Dogs: A Natural History, by Jake Page
Page looks at dogs' wild brothers, the wolves, and their closer cousins, the wild or pariah dogs; explains the newest theory of how dogs were domesticated; describes a dog's development from puppyhood on; and finally ponders a dog's emotional life and intelligence. 

 
 

A Dog's History of America: How Our Best Friend Explored, Conquered, and Settled a Continent, by Mark Derr
In this remarkable history of the interaction between humans and dogs, Derr looks at the ways in which we have used canines -- as sled dogs and sheepdogs, hounds and service dogs, show dogs and bomb-sniffing dogs -- as he tracks changes in American culture and society. 

 
 Working Like a Dog: The Story of Working Dogs through History, by Gena Gorrell
Since the early Stone Age, our lives and the lives of dogs have been interwoven. This fascinating book describes the dogs of history, the evolution of breeds for different purposes and the training involved in preparing the modern-day heroes who find lost children, nab criminals and point out contraband.

 
E-books:

 Dogs: A Short History from Wolf to Woof*
Three riveting essays by some of National Geographic magazine's most highly esteemed writers explore the canine-human relationship and what scientists are learning from dogs. Filled with amazing facts, colorful anecdotes and accessible science, this e-book provides a fascinating guide to some of the world's most beloved creatures.
 

Streaming Media from Hoopla:

 Science of Dogs*
This National Geographic documentary looks at man's evolutionary manipulation of dogs' appearance, talents and temperament – and the accelerating efforts to create breeds to suit our needs. 

 

 

 

 The Wolf in the Parlor: The Eternal Connection Between Humans and Dogs*
Dogs are everywhere, but how much do we really know about where they came from and the implications of their place in our world? In this audiobook, Franklin recounts his findings from a decade spent studying the origins and significance of the dog and its peculiar attachment to humans.

 

 


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