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The Great Depression

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A Portrait of Missouri, 1935-1943: Photographs from the Farm Security Administration
by Paul E. Parker Details
In an attempt to build popular support for the New Deal and the controversial Farm Security Administration (FSA), a team of FSA photographers traveled across the nation and documented American life in the thirties, capturing images of the old ways while seeking to justify a new agricultural order. Seven of these photographers traveled through Missouri and produced a collection of over 1,250 pictures. Drawing on those photographs, "A Portrait of Missouri, 1935-1943" chronicles the photographers' work, the programs they sought to promote, and the slices of life they captured in Missouri during this time. Small town life, desperate farm conditions, urban renewal, and the 1939 sharecroppers' strike are all brought to life in these intriguing photographs.
America 1933: The Great Depression, Lorena Hickok, Eleanor Roosevelt, and the Shaping of the New Deal
by Michael Golay Details
During the harshest year of the Great Depression, Lorena Hickok, a top woman news reporter and intimate friend of Eleanor Roosevelt, was hired by FDR's right-hand man Harry Hopkins to embark upon a grueling journey to the hardest-hit areas of the country to report back on the degree of devastation. Distinguished historian Michael Golay draws on a trove of original sources--including the moving, remarkably intimate, almost daily letters between Hickok and Eleanor Roosevelt--as he re-creates that extraordinary journey.
Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression
by Morris Dickstein Details
In this timely and long-awaited cultural history, Morris Dickstein explores the anxiety and hope, the despair and surprising optimism of a traumatized nation. Dickstein's fascination springs from his own childhood, from a father who feared a pink slip every Friday and from his own love of the more exuberant side of the era: zany screwball comedies, witty musicals, and the lubricious choreography of Busby Berkeley. Whether analyzing the influence of film, design, literature, theater, or music, Dickstein lyrically demonstrates how the arts were then so integral to the fabric of American society.
Dear Mrs. Roosevelt: Letters from Children of the Great Depression
by Robert Cohen Details
Activism made Eleanor Roosevelt a beloved figure among poor children and teens, who between 1933 and 1941 wrote her thousands of letters describing their problems and requesting her help. In "Dear Mrs. Roosevelt," Robert Cohen presents nearly 200 of these extraordinary documents and opens a window into the lives of the Depression's youngest victims.
Freedom from Fear, Part 1: The American People in the Great Depression
by David M. Kennedy Details
In this first installment of his Pulitzer Prize-winning series, David M. Kennedy describes how America endured, and eventually prevailed, in the face of the unprecedented calamity that was the Great Depression. With an even hand, Kennedy details the New Deal's problems and defeats, as well as its achievements. He also sheds fresh light on its incandescent but enigmatic author, Franklin D. Roosevelt. With unforgettable narratives, featuring prominent leaders as well as lesser-known citizens, "The American People in the Great Depression" tells the story of a resilient nation finding courage in an unrelenting storm.
Little Heathens: Hard Times and High Spirits on an Iowa Farm During the Great Depression
by Mildred Armstrong Kalish Details
Mildred Armstrong Kalish's memoir of her Iowa childhood, set against the backdrop of the Great Depression, captures a vanished way of traditional living and a specific moment in American history. Recounted in a luminous narrative, brimming with tenderness and humor, and filled with recipes and how-tos for everything from catching and skinning a rabbit to preparing homemade skin and hair beautifiers,"Little Heathens" shows how the right stuff can make even the bleakest of times seem like "quite a romp."
Long Time Coming: A Photographic Portrait of America, 1935-1943
by Michael Lesy Details
"Long Time Coming" is derived from the 145,000 photographs taken between 1935 and 1943 by a now-famous team of photographers employed by the Farm Security Administration (FSA). While most of us are familiar with the iconic images of poverty usually associated with the project, the agency's mission went well beyond photographing dispossessed rural people. This collection from Michael Lesy includes 410 remarkable images taken in large cities--including New York, Chicago, Minneapolis, Omaha, and Pittsburgh--as well as dozens of small towns and villages throughout the United States and Puerto Rico.
The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression
by Amity Shlaes Details
In "The Forgotten Man," Amity Shlaes, one of the nation's most respected economic commentators, offers a striking reinterpretation of the Great Depression. Rejecting the old emphasis on the New Deal, she turns to the neglected and moving stories of individual Americans, and shows how through brave leadership they helped establish the steadfast character we developed as a nation.
The Great Depression: An Eyewitness History
by David F. Burg Details
Drawing on memoirs, speeches, letters, and newspapers,"The Great Depression: An Eyewitness History" provides hundreds of firsthand accounts of this period, illustrating how historical events appeared to the people who lived through them. Among the eyewitness testimonies included are those of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Huey Long, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and hundreds more.
The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl
by Timothy Egan Details
In "The Worst Hard Time," Timothy Egan follows a dozen families and their communities through the dust storms that terrorized America's High Plains during the Great Depression. Egan's portraits of the families who stayed behind are vivid, sobering, and far less familiar than those of the "exodusters," the displaced families who fled the High Plains amid the catastrophe.
Updated 10/02/2014
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