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Black Families: Introduction to USCT & Honor Roll Picture Sets 1-2
Pages 253-270


ROSTER OF THE

1ST AND 2ND REGIMENTS COLORED

INFANTRY OF KANSAS

This roster, taken from the Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kansas 1861-61, is included because many of the soldiers listed are believed to have been slaves from Missouri. Although most recruits denoted their residences as being located inside Kansas, a runaway slave would have been reluctant to volunteer his former master's address or claim it as his own. By the time these two regiments were organized, many blacks had already fled the war in Missouri to places of safety such as Fort Scott and Leavenworth. Thus, the identities of more than a few Missouri natives were obscured within the ranks of the colored infantry.

"1ST REGIMENT COLORED INFANTRY"

This regiment was organized at Fort Scott, Kansas, and mustered in as a battalion on January 13, 1863. An engagement at Island Mound, Missouri, on October 27, 1862, is claimed as the first action of the war involving black troops. At the time, these green recruits had merely assembled in the area, but had not been mustered into service formally. They were attacked by Confederates under Col. F. M. Cockrell. Ten men among the 1st recruits were killed and 12 wounded.

Senator James Lane of Kansas was influential in organizing troops and was authorized in the summer of 1862 to do so by the War Department. Needless to say, raising a regiment of African American soldiers caused considerable delay and opposition. Perhaps the action at Island Mound, near Butler, Missouri, proved the worth of black soldiers.

The 1st also SAW action in Indian Territory, at Cabin Creek, on July 1-2, 1863, and Honey Springs later that month. The 1st also fought at Prairie d'Ane, Moscow, and Poison Springs, Arkansas. There the loss in killed and wounded was 187 out of a force of less than 500.

On December 13, 1864, the regiment's name was changed to the 79th U. S. colored Troops (New). Combined losses during the war came to 5 officers and 183 enlisted men killed in action and an additional 1 officer and 165 enlisted men felled by disease.

The Regiment was mustered out at Pine Bluff, Arkansas, On October 1, 1865, being discharged at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, on October 30, 1865.

"2ND REGIMENT COLORED INFANTRY"

The 2nd was organized at Fort Scott and Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, in August, September, and October of 1863. Part of the 2nd saw action at Baxter Springs, Arkansas, on October 6, 1863.

On December 13, 1864, like the 1st, the 2nd received a name change to the "83rd U. S. Colored Troops (New)." Sometimes this long name, "United States Colored Troops," is abbreviated as USCT in some reference books.

The 2nd was deployed mainly in Arkansas. They fought at Jenkins' Ferry and had losses of 1 officer and 72 men killed or wounded.

During the war this regiment lost 1 officer and 37 enlisted men killed in action and another 187 men from disease.

The 2nd was mustered out at Camden, Arkansas, October 9, 1865, and discharged at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, on November 27, 1865.

THESE CONDENSED HISTORIES OF THE 1ST/ 79TH AND THE 2ND/83 "KANSAS COLORED/UNITED STATES COLORED TROOPS" ARE TAKEN FROM THE FOLLOWING:

Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kansas 1861-65, Vol. 1. Topeka: the Kansas State Printing Company. 1896.

A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion. Frederick H. Dyer. Des Moines, Iowa: Dyer Publishing Co 1908.

The Union Army, Vol IV. Federal Publishing Company. 1908.

SEE ALSO

The Official Record of the War of the Rebellion, a multi-volume set printed in the late 19th century by the Federal Government. This set, also available on CD ROM and the internet, contains battle reports, letters, troop movements, campaign information, and other items too numerous to mention. There is an index volume which directs the search to an index in a particular volume. Often individual soldiers and officers are named. Action of individual regiments is also listed. Some black soldiers, besides serving in USCT regiments, did serve with Indian Home Guard units.

**********************************************

NAMES IN THE REPORT OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL

OF THE STATE OF KANSAS, 1861-65

ARE LISTED IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

BY COMPANY OFFICERS ARE LISTED

AT THE BEGINNING OF COMPANY ROSTERS

NAMES LISTED IN THE 1ST AND 2ND KANSAS

WILL NOT BE IN THE GENERAL INDEX

MILITARY HONOR ROLL OF GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI

PHOTOGRAPHS OF WORLD WAR ONE

SOLDIERS

This publication presents a short history of World War I along with photographs of officers, soldiers, and sailors from Greene County, Missouri. The company that produced this book may have produced similar ones for other counties both in Missouri and other states.

Often there are written or printed genealogical records available for researchers. Pictorial records are rare. This excerpt, taken from a much larger selection of Greene County men and women, documents the longevity in the area of many family names.

Abernathy, Eugene

Abernathy, George

Abernathy, Hattie

Abernathy, Marie

Burns, W. T. H.

Burns, Alice

Burns, Adams

Burns, Pearl

Canifax, William

Canifax, Mandy

Canifax, James

Foster, Albon L.

Foster, Mary

Foster, Vincent

Carmack, Charles

Cooper, Darwin M.

Cooper, J. T.

Cooper, B. B.

Cooper, Essie

Cooper, Ella

Cooper, Willis

Eblon, Homer O.

Eblon, Ida

Eblon, Pearl

Eblon, Bessie

Ingram, Lawrence C.

Jeffries, Arthur W.

Jeffries, Esther

Jeffries, Arthur

Lucas, Eugene

Lucas, Sarah

Lucas, Eugene

Mason, William

Mason, Steve

Mason, Minnie


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