History of Greene County, Missouri
1883

R. I. Holcombe, Editing Historian


Chapter 14
History of the County from April, 1865 to 1870

Part 2
1867 — Items — Killing of James Simpson by Kindred Rose — Killing of Perry Lewis by Samuel Massey — Murder of Judge H. C. Christian by Texas "Avengers" — Escape of the "Avengers," — Singular Suicide — Board of Immigration — Location of the National Cemetery. 1868 — Statistics — Storms and Floods — The Political Campaign of 1868 — Abstract of the Vote at the November Election — Miscellaneous Incidents. 1869 — Items — The Memphis, Springfield and Kansas City Railroad — Editors in Council — Statistics — Organization and History of the Confederate Burial Association — Tragedies of 1869 — Killing of Willis Wynn by Wm. Birt — Murder of John Marshall — Fatal Runaway.


1867— ITEMS.

The assessor's books for this year showed 2,893 names. The assessed value of real estate in the county exceeded $1,800,000. The taxable property of Springfield amounted to $554,000, and the number of polls was 260. The total value of real and personal property in the county was $3,211,786. A county tax of 40 cents on the $100 was levied.

February 28 the land office at Springfield was reopened for business, but in a day or two closed, because the register and receiver, appointed by Andrew Johnson, had not been confirmed by the U. S. Senate, with which body the President was then engaged in quarreling, and under the Civil Tenure-of-Office Bill, those officers could no longer act. In April Hon. John S. Waddill was confirmed as resister, and June 10th the office was reopened. From the 10th to the 30th of June there were entered at this office under the homestead act 19, —634 acres; with military land warrants, 320 acres; with Agricultural College script, 3,676 acres; cash sales, 1,989 acres; total, 25,619 acres. [506]

In January A. Holloway was reappointed keeper of the county poor farm, "Alphabet" Mack county attorney, and M. J. Hubble, county road commissioner, the latter at a salary of $1,000 a year. Other appointments were those of John Laney, Col. F. S. Jones, and Hugh Boyd in July as cattle inspectors under the Texas cattle fever law, and J. T. Hubbard in November, by the Governor, as public administrator.

A grand 4th of July celebration was held at Springfield this year. One of the noticeable features was the little flock of Federal soldiers' orphans in the care of Mrs. Phelps. They were all dressed in a uniform expressly prepared for the occasion by that lady.

The first fair of the Southwestern District Fair Association since 1861 was held this year at Springfield, October 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th. It was fairly successful.

October 31st a teachers' institute convened at Springfield.

April 4th the first number of the Springfield Leader, a Democratic paper, was issued by O. S. Fahnestock & Co. The paper was an eight-column folio, and announced that politically it would uphold the principles of conservative Democracy. One of the proprietors, Mr. Fahnestock, had been in the Federal service during the war; another, Mr. D. C. Kennedy, the present proprietor, had been a Confederate soldier.

Deaths.— May 29th Mrs. Ophelia Perkins, aogd 33, wife of Capt. J. B. Perkins, and daughter of J. M. Rountree. —January 19th, Judge John Murray. —October 15th, David Appleby, aged 79.

TRAGEDIES OF 1867—KILLING OF JAMES SIMPSON BY KINDRED ROSE.

About the 28th of February a quarrel occurred in a blacksmith shop in Springfield between two old men, James Simpson and Kindred Rose. Both men were old citizens of the county. Rose came here in 1831. There are no fools like old fools, and the two men allowed their ill-temper to get beyond all proper bounds. Simpson had been drinking but was not much intoxicated. He began taunting Rose about having "gone South," in 1861. Rose replied in a contemptuous manner regarding the Federal government, when Simpson caught up a pair of tongs and exclaimed, "You shan't talk that way to me." Rose seized a bar of iron and struck Simpson on the side of the head, knocking him down. Other parties interfered and the fight stopped. [507]

Simpson's wound was examined by Doctors Robberson, Cecil, and Murphy, and pronounced not dangerous at all. Simpson, with two or three friends, went to the Lyon House (now the Southern) took a drink, and started home. Soon after starting he fell into a stupor and alarming symptoms set in. The wagon was stopped and Simpson taken into the house of Mrs. McFarland. He continued to grow worse from hour to hour and died the next morning.

At first Mr. Rose was taken before the city recorder and fined $10 and costs for assault and battery. On Simpson's death, however, Rose was re-arrested waived examination and was bound over in the sum of $10,000. Upon his trial he was acquitted on the ground of self-defense. Hon. John S. Phelps was his counsel.

KILLING OF PERRY LEWIS BY SAMUEL MASSEY.

On the night of March 27, in Springfield, a young man named Perry Lewis was shot through the heart by Samuel Massey and instantly killed. It was stated that Massey, Lewis, John Gott, and Joseph Danforth, being friends and associates, were "on a spree," and about 11 o'clock at night went to a brothel in the northwestern suburbs. There they met with a stage driver, named Green, and a quarrel soon sprang up between him on the one side and Massey and Lewis on the other. All three had drawn their coats to fight, when Massey drew a pistol and snapped it at Green. In making a second effort to fire Lewis caught the weapon to prevent the shooting and in attempting to wrest it from Massey's hands it was exploded, with the fatal result to Lewis. This was the substance of the testimony before the coroner's jury.

MURDER OF JUDGE H. C. CHRISTIAN.

At about 9 p.m. of Friday evening, May 24, Judge H. C. Christian, of Springfield, was shot and instantly killed, at his place of business, by some parties then unknown.

The deceased, in company with one Buck, was keeping a market-house on the corner of Mill and Boonville streets. Two unknown persons entered his establishment, engaged in conversation with him, and, seizing a favorable opportunity, deliberately shot him through the head with a navy revolver killing him instantly. The ball entered the left temple, passed through the brain in an oblique direction, striking a bone opposite the right car and ranged downward and lodged. It was extracted by Drs. Jenks and Chambers. The murderers then left the house and started on a run around the corner up Mill street a short distance, where they were met by Patrick Daly who ordered them to halt; one immediately halted and fired a shot at Daly, but missed his mark. Daly, being unarmed, failed to arrest them. He, in company with one or two others, went to the market-house and found Mr. Christian lying dead behind his counter, his pocket book lying on the floor beside him, and a one dollar green-back on his knee. [508]

Within an hour after the murder parties started out in all directions in pursuit. A reward of $500 was offered for their arrest, one-half by the mayor of the city, one-half by the sheriff. A plausible theory was that he had been followed from Texas (his old home) by enemies who had sworn to take his life. He had received a letter two weeks previous warning him that his life would be taken. The murderers were pursued and one of them, Jacob Thompson, was captured next morning, west of town. The prisoner was brought to town in charge of Col. Geiger, and the other was seen near where Thompson was captured, but he escaped. On the way to town Thompson tried to bribe Col. Geiger to release him, but of course did not succeed. After being brought to town the prisoner was recognized by Patrick Daly and others.

The prisoner was examined before Justices Vangeuder and Matthews and was defended by Hon. John S. Phelps, and prosecuted by Circuit Attorney Creighton, assisted by Col. Geiger and J. W. D. L. F. Mack. He was committed to jail to await the action of the grand jury.

June 21, at 5 p.m., Thompson escaped from jail. He had broken his irons with a brick, and his cell door had been left open. Knowledge of Thompson's escape caused feelings of the strongest indignation among the citizens. The singular manner in which the escape was made caused suspicions of the gravest character to be freely expressed against the jailor, who was removed next morning by the sheriff.

After making his escape Thompson started east. About six miles from town he stole a horse from Geo. Croson. Croson and others started in pursuit the next morning about 9. They traced him through to Marshfield and from there to within five miles of Houston, Texas county, about one hundred miles from Springfield, when he was captured in a blacksmith shop, where he was getting the stolen horse shod. He mounted his horse and made a desperate effort to escape, but was fired at by his pursuers and shot in the shoulder and thigh. His captors were not aware, until informed by the prisoner, that he was the individual that had escaped from jail, but supposed he was only guilty of stealing the horse in his possession. After capturing him they hired a two-horse wagon and. brought him to Springfield, arriving at noon next day. He was conveyed to the jail and placed in confinement. [509]

Oct. 24, Thompson escaped from jail with a colored man, and was never thereafter re-apprehended. It is reported that he was afterward hung for a murder in Texas.

Judge Christian had resided in Texas before the war and on account of his Union sentiments was forced to leave in 1862. He and his two sons entered the Federal service and upon the close of the war he was appointed a provost marshal in Texas. It was for some acts of his while in the execution of his office that he was followed and killed.

SUITS—A SINGULAR METHOD OF SELF-MURDER.

September 24th, a man named Andrews, living near Fair Grove, separated two of the lower rails of a panel of fence sufficient to permit his head to pass through, and then fastened them in this position with an ax, the back of the blade resting on the lower rail while the whole weight of the fence rested on the edge of the ax. The trap being in readiness, he placed his neck in position, and then, with his own hand, withdrew the ax and let the fence fall on his neck. He was soon choked to death.

About Christmas, a man named Robinson, living in Center township, seven miles west of Springfield, shot himself through the head with a revolver, and died instantly. The cause was not made known.

BOARD OF IMMIGRATION.

In October (the 10th) the organization of the Greene County Board of Immigration was effected under the direction of State Senator Goebel, who visited Springfield for the purpose, and delivered an interesting address. The board was composed at first of 22 members, and did much to induce immigration to this county. Hon. S. H. Boyd was a leading member.

LOCATION OF THE NATIONAL CEMETERY.

About the 10th of July Mr. Wm. Goodyear, the agent of the government for collecting the remains of the Federal soldiers buried in Southwestern Missouri, came to Springfield to oversee the work of removing them to the cemetery grounds, which had been purchased near Springfield. Work was immediately begun, and the dead were collected and buried as fast as possible.

In the month of September, Adj. Gen. Lorenzo Thomas, then on a tour of inspection of the national cemeteries, had visited Springfield, coming up by stage from Fayetteville, and fully approved the arrangements here. [510]

1868—STATISTICS.

From the assessor's books for this year it is learned that the number of full sections of land in the county was 469; number of fractional sections, 161; number of acres in the total superficial area, 438,424.43; number of acres not subject to taxation, 187,877.43; total valuation of real estate, $2,519,988; total valuation of personal property, $2,063,100. Total assessed value of property in Springfield, $980,876; number of polls, 362.

The records show that this year the population of the county was 12,792, as follows: White males, 6,068 ; white females, 5,826 ; total whites, 11,894. Colored males, 512; females, 487; total colored, 999. Number of deaf and dumb in the county, 6; blind, 5; insane, 16. Number of horses, 6,596; mules, 1,405; cattle, 13,184; sheep, 23,626; hogs, 34,835. Number of bushels of wheat, 96,320; corn, 732,291; oats, 158,214; rye, 2,039. Number of pounds of tobacco, 17,168; wool, 45,615. Number of gallons of molasses made in the county, 34,124; of wine, 41 of whisky, 75. Number of tons of hay, 2,454.

THE POLITICAL CAMPAIGN OF 1868.

This was the first Presidential year since the war, and although the canvass was largely one-sided, it was intensely interesting in Greene county at times. The Radical Republicans, owing, to the number of Democrats disfranchised, were in a large majority, and were early in the fight. February 20th they had a meeting at the court-house in Springfield, presided over by James Abbott. Delegates were appointed to the State Convention, as follows: S. W. Headlee, H. G. Mullings, L. A. Rountree, Maj. R. J. McElhany, and Dr. T. J. Bailey. The following resolution was adopted:

Resolved, That our delegates to the Republican National Convention, to be holden in Chicago on the 20th day of May next, be instructed to use all honorable means to have the vote of Missouri cast for that pure patriot-soldier, and statesman, Ulysses S. Grant, for our candidate for President of the United States, and that our delegates at the convention in Jefferson City, on the 22d inst., be instructed to use all honorable means to the same end. [511]

A Republican club was formed at Springfield, Feb. 22, with James Abbott, as president, and J. R. Milner and Capt. Case, as secretaries. Upon the receipt of the news of the nomination of Grant and Colfax, a ratification meeting was held, and August 22, a "Grant and Colfax pole," 145 feet in length, was raised in the center of the public square.

July 27th, the Republican Congressional Convention for this district was held at Springfield. A resolution opposing the payment of the 5-20 bonds in greenbacks, a project then known as "the Pendleton plan," and a part of the national Democratic platform, was adopted, with but feeble dissent. The candidates before the convention were Col. J. J. Gravelly (for re-election) of Cedar county, Col. S. H. Boyd, of this county, and John R. Kelso. Gravelly had written a letter favoring the taxation of government bonds and in other ways had shown a dislike for the financial part of the Republican platform—in truth, believed in the righteousness of the "Pendleton plan." Boyd was for paying the bonds in hard money—gold, or its equivalent. Boyd was nominated by the following vote: Kelso, 5; Gravelly, 18; Boyd, 48.

Speeches were made by Judge Fyan and others in endorsement of all the Republican candidates before the people and inviting the voters to come up to their support. Judge Fyan called upon the members of the convention to pledge themselves as a body and to each other individually to stand by the registering officers and see the registration law enforced in its letter and spirit, and to meet half way any armed resistance thereto on the part of "rebels and their friends." (Applause.)

The same day at the senatorial convention, Hon. S. M. Headlee, of this county, was renominated by acclamation.

The Democrats, though with full knowledge that they were in a hopeless minority, not only in the county, but in the district and throughout the State, were plucky and made a fairly good campaign. July 11th, at night, they held a meeting in Springfield ratifying the nomination of Seymour and Blair. A bonfire was lit, which the marshal of the town, a Radical, tried to have put out, but failed very signally. Nearly two weeks later they held a spirited meeting in the court-house, which was addressed by Hon. John S. Phelps and Hon. J. H. Show. [512]

 On the 20th of October, notwithstanding the early elections in that month had demonstrated the certainty of their defeat, they raised a "Seymour and Blair pole" side by side with the Republican pole at Springfield, amid great enthusiasm.

In the summer the Democratic Congressional Convention was held at Springfield, and Capt. C. B. McAfee, an ex-Federal soldier, hitherto mentioned, was nominated for Congress. Capt. McAfee made a thorough canvass of the district, speaking even in Melville, Dade county, where the Republicans had declared no Democrat should be allowed to speak

During the campaign Democratic speeches were made in the county by Gen. C. W. Blair, of Ft. Scott, and the Republicans were addressed by Gov. McClurg, Carl Schurz, Emil Preetorius, and Rev. A. C. George, besides their own home orators. Though the bitterness of the war had not entirely died out, and there were criminations and recriminations by both sides, there was a fair condition of good feeling between the two parties during the campaign. The following was the result of the November election in this county:

ABSTRACT OF THE VOTE AT THE NOVEMBER ELECTION.

 

President

Governor

Congressman

State Sen.

Representatives

Sheriff

Treasurer

Townships

Grant

Seymour

McClurg

Phelps

Boyd

McAfee

Kelso

Headlee

Watson

Rountree

Hubble

Mullings

E.Headlee

Patterson

Owen

Ingram

McAdams

Clay

84

11

83

11

69

11

4

82

11

81

12

0

0

76

12

81

11

Pond Creek

72

16

72

16

68

16

1

69

16

72

16

0

0

72

16

72

16

Center

96

37

95

37

79

37

6

94

36

0

0

80

24

69

41

91

37

Boone

117

90

112

95

107

95

5

113

94

0

0

108

93

102

86

112

94

Wilson

44

63

44

62

28

64

8

43

63

35

71

0

0

23

80

44

61

Cass

107

58

102

64

73

62

27

105

62

0

0

85

61

82

56

101

61

Taylor

98

13

95

16

91

15

0

95

15

95

14

0

0

91

16

94

15

Robberson

167

66

163

69

150

67

8

158

64

0

0

145

75

153

69

164

66

Jackson

104

63

99

66

91

64

2

100

63

0

0

99

65

100

64

102

64

Campbell

414

323

374

357

366

332

13

400

331

385

350

0

0

396

332

401

332

TOTAL

1303

740

1239

793

1122

763

74

1259

755

668

463

517

318

1164

772

1262

757

 

Republicans in italic. The total registration for this election was 2,318; that cast was 2,044. The total vote on other candidates was as follows: Circuit judge, R. W. Fyan, 1,276 ; J. S. Waddill, 707. Circuit attorney, J. M. Patterson, 1,261; Quinn, 755. Probate judge, W. F. Geiger, 927, no opposition. County judges, Benj. Kite, 1,246; R. P. Matthews, 1,249; J. R. Earnest, 652. Supt. common schools, J. R. Milner, 616; F. H. Warren, 295. Surveyor, I. N. Jones, 1,216; Chesley Cannefax, 733. [513]

MISCELLANEOUS INCIDENTS IN 1868.

Newspapers.—March 12th Win. J. Teed again became part proprietor of the Patriot. March 14th, A. F. Ingram issued the first number of a paper called the Weekly Gazette. July 3, Lindley Bros. issued an advertising sheet called the Real Estate Herald. In September O. S. Fahnestock retired from the Leader, having disposed of his interest to D. C. Kennedy. Nov. 28, the proprietors of the Patriot purchased Ingram's Gazette, and the two offices were consolidated.

Celebrations. - Decoration Day was observed at Springfield for the first time, this year. An imposing procession was formed, with Hon. W. F. Geiger as chief Marshal. Speeches were delivered by Colo. S. H. Boyd and W. E. Gilmore. The colored population on August 4th celebrated emancipation in the West Indies by a meeting in a grove north of town. They were addressed by Col. Gilmore, Hon. James Baker, Capt. Budd, and Capt. Colby.

The Railroad.— July 4th ground was broken and work begun on the Atlantic and Pacific railroad, in this county, in presence of several distinguished persons, among, whom was Gov. Thos. C. Fletcher, always a strong friend to the enterprise, and who for some time past had been personally interested in its construction.

Horticultural Society.—August 17th the Greene County Horticultural Society was organized, with C. F. Leavitt as president, and B. F. Lee, as secretary. A fair was held the ensuing fall.

1869—ITEMS.

Five Sunday schools were organized in the county in the month of February, by Rev. W. J. Haydon.

The number of school children in the county in 1869 was 7,640; the amount of school money was $7,706.92; the increase in the number of children over 1868 was 431.

The first fair of the Greene County Horticultural Society was held Sept. 17th and 18th, of this year. The president was F. F. Fine, and the secretary C. F. S. Thomas.

In April there was a special election for circuit judge and circuit attorney. The candidates were W. F. Geiger and R. J. Lindenbower, for judge, and J. M. Patterson and J. M. Grammar, for attorney. In this county the vote stood: Geiger, 598 ; Lindenbower, 501. For attorney, Patterson, 455; Grammar, 238. In November J. H. Show (Democrat) ran between H. J. Curtice and J. A. Mack (Republicans) for judge of the probate and common pleas court, and was elected, the vote standing—Show, 362; Curtice, 348; Mack, 161. For county justice G. M. McElhannon (Republicans received 420 votes and J. R. Earnest 350. [514]

Deaths.—April 17th, Dr. T. J. Bailey, aged 67 (see biography elsewhere). April 8th, Nathaniel Massey. Dec. 11th, Judge John A. Mack, aged 62; born in Pittsylvania county, Va., Jan. 8, 1807 lived in Maury county, Tenn., from 1811 to 1852, when he came to this county; was circuit attorney during the war; a member of the constitutional convention of 1865; probate and common pleas judge of this county from 1863 till his death. Republican in politics.

THE MEMPHIS, SPRINGFIELD AND KANSAS CITY R. R.

This year the most interesting topic of discussion before the people of Greene county was in regard to the building of the Kansas City and Memphis railroad, via Springfield. Having one railroad almost completed to the county, it was of vast importance that another should be secured. The old fogies, to be sure, were opposed to this as to every other project for the public weal, likely to cost themselves a nickel, but the men of enterprise and push, made earnest efforts, not only to secure the successful inauguration of the proposed new railroad, but its speedy completion.

In their zeal the friends of another railroad went to extremes, but they erred on the wrong side and there was no harm done. In September the county court made an order that at the November election the people should vote on the question whether or not the county should take $400,000 stock in railroads, viz.: In the Fort Scott, Springfield & Memphis railroad, $180,000, and in the Kansas City, Springfield & Memphis railroad, $120,000. The sense of the people was against the subscription, the vote standing, for, 368; against, 486; but it is said that if all the disfranchised could have voted the proposition would have been carried, had as the policy of subscribing bonds on the part of a county in aid of any public enterprise is—and was.

EDITORS IN COUNCIL.

October 1st the editors and publishers of Southwest Missouri met in convention at Springfield. In the evening a banquet was given at the Lyon House. A heavy rain kept many invited guests away, and there were but few ladies present. At 10 o'clock about 50 members of the convention and those holding invitations sat down to the table in the dining-room of the hotel.. Hon. John S. Phelps presided and announced the regular toasts of the evening, which were responded to by Col. Wm. E. Gilmore and others. The banquet broke up about 2 a.m. A ball was contemplated and arranged for, but had to be given up, by reason of the storm. The convention itself was held in the Patriot office. Col. James Dumars, of the Bolivar Free Press, presided, and H. H. Judson, of the Granby Independent, was secretary.

STATISTICS.

The assessor's books for the year 1869 show that the value of taxable property for that year was as follows:

Property

Number

Valuation

Acres of real estate

293,716

$2,970,719

Capital Stock of corporation companies

0

124,000

Horses

6,938

369,482

Mules

1,550

119,064

Meat cattle

14,435

182,397

Sheep

24,848

42,057

Hobs

35,623

68,304

All other personal property

0

1,555,727


The number of persons assessed was 3,539.

ORGANIZATION OF THE CONFEDERATE BURIAL ASSOCIATION.1

On the 23d of November, 1869, a meeting was held in the office of Capt. Geo. M. Jones, in Springfield, to take steps for the formation of an association whose purpose was to remove the remains of the dead Confederate soldiers in and about Springfield, to a permanent cemetery near the town. Mr. Benj. U. Massey was chairman and Mr., D. C. Kennedy secretary of the meeting. A committee, consisting of Capt. Jones and Messrs. Massey and Kennedy, was appointed to report names for a permanent organization of such an association at a subsequent meeting.

——————
1 The idea of the formation of this association was first suggested by Mrs. Lula Kennedy, in a communication to the Platte City (Mo.) Landmark.
——————

This meeting convened at the courthouse on the evening of November 27, and was called to order by Benj. U. Massey. Mr. W. J. Haydon made the following report on permanent organization: President, Capt. Geo. M. Jones; vice-presidents, J. T. Morton, Col. R. W. Crawford, and Elder Kirk Baxter; treasurer, Dr. C. K. Dyer; secretary, W. J. Haydon; executive-committee, J. T. Appler, Rev. Wm. Protsman, J. C. Cravens, Geo. M. Jones, and W. J. Haydon; financial committee, T. J. Gates, A. G. Leedy, J. M. Doling, J. M. Smith, D. L. Fulbright, J. Y. Fulbright, B. K. Massey, D. C. Kennedy, P. Frazier , Dr. L. Hansford, Colonel John Price, Col. E. Y. Mitchell, and F. R. Porter. On motion, the following ladies were added to the financial committee, and the president authorized to add other names at pleasure of such persons as were willing to assist: Mrs. J. L. French, Mrs. J. E. Phelps, Mrs. J. S. Phelps, Mrs. W. H. Wilson, Mrs. W. H. Graves, Mrs. A. E. Andrews, Mrs. F. R. Smith, Mrs. W. M. Protsman, Mrs. J. Chesnut, Mrs. W. C. Hornbeak, Mrs. C. K. Dyer, Mrs. M. C. Haydon, Mrs. M. W. Bowen, Mrs. Cecil, Mrs. Saml. Alexander, Mrs. Rush C. Owen, Mrs. Geo. M. Jones, Mrs. J. B. Dexter, Mrs. C. A. Leack, Mrs. A. A. Shutt, Mrs. W. J. McDaniel, Mrs. Chas. Sheppard, Mrs. Henry Sheppard, Mrs. D. C. Kennedy, Mrs. J. R. Waddill, Mrs. Joe Farrier, Mrs. John Wood, Mrs. J. C. Gardner, Mrs. J. T. Appler, Mrs. Joe Weaver, Miss Annie Leedy, Miss Weaver, Miss Vinton, Miss Boxley, Miss Wear, Miss Gates, Miss Matteson, Miss Waddill, Miss Sallie Smith, Miss Virgie Parish, Miss Evans, Miss Fristo, Miss Martin, and Miss Elliott. The following memorial was then read by Mr. Massey, as a suitable heading for subscription lists, and adopted:

In and around the city of Springfield and on the battlefield of Wilson's Creek, in exposed graves, are the remains of a large number of Confederate soldiers, who were killed in the various battles and skirmishes that occurred in this vicinity. In many places their fleshless bones can be seen above the earth—a reproach to the humanity and civilization of our people. In all countries, civilized or barbarous, the remains of those slain in battle are humanely interred; whether Turk or Greek, friend or foe, all are honored with a decent burial. In order to procure a proper graveyard for the re-interment of these dead, this association has been formed, and appeals to the humanity, christianity and generosity of all good people to assist in carrying out this object.

Brief speeches were then made by Messrs. Graves, Mitchell, and Kennedy, after which subscription lists were circulated among the audience, and $304.00 subscribed. A motion was made and adopted, that a festival be given for the, benefit of this object, on Thursday, December 16th, 1869, and the following were appointed as a committee of arrangements: Messrs. Appler, White, and Gates, and Mesdames Protsman, Alexander, Bowren, Lack, and Shutt. [517]

The committee appointed to devise ways and means for the getting, up of a grand entertainment, for the purpose of re-interring, the Confederate dead, in and around the city of Springfield, reported the following working committee: North Springfield— Mrs. Hart Wilson, Mrs. Dr. Robberson, Mrs. Hornbeak, Mrs. J. Leedy, Miss Sallie Gates, Miss Sue Wear. Southeast Springfield—Mrs. Dexter, Mrs. Carson, Mrs. J. French, Mrs. Dr. Cecil. Southwest Springfield—Mrs. Sam. Alexander, Mrs. H. J. Lindenbower, Mrs. Haydon, Mrs. Dr. Cox. Mrs. Lack, Miss V. Parish. Country north—Mrs. Danforth, Thos. Gates. Country southeast—Miss Goza, Miss Vandyke. Country southwest - Mrs. Bowren. Country east— Mrs. Rush C. Owen. Country west— Mrs. J. E. Phelps.

By the efforts of the workers about $2,200 were raised—some in St. Louis and North Missouri—but the larger portion was raised in Springfield and vicinity. Three and a half acres of ground was at once purchased, three miles south of the city,—adjoining the Federal cemetery on the north, and Hazelwood cemetery on the south—which was fenced and decorated in accordance with the financial condition of the association, and into which were interred the remains of 238 Confederate soldiers from Wilson's Creek and 263 from in and around Springield, making a total in all of 501 interments. Of these only a few are known; among them Col. R. H. Weightman, Col. Geo. W. Allen, Cols. Foster, Austin, and Ben Brown, all of whom fell at Wilson's Creek. These graves are marked; the others with a few exceptions are unknown.

The funds—all of which were voluntary contributions were used with a great deal of care and economy by those managing the association and thus a good work accomplished. The association has a constitution and by-laws, and a board of trustees, composed of J. M. Doling, J. C. Cravens, and D. C. Kennedy.

This cemetery is the only distinctive Confederate cemetery in Missouri, and the ex-Confederates, at their reunion in Sedalia, in 1882, adopted it as their special charge and intend to adorn it in such a manner as to make it worthy of the dead heroes and loving citizens who figured in the lost cause. The natural situation is beautiful, and with the funds at the command of the association, it could be beautified so as to look equally as well as the Federal cemetery adjoining. It is to be hoped that this improvement will soon be made. [518]

TRAGEDIES OF THE YEAR 1869—KILLING OF WILLIS WYNN BY WM. BIRT.

July 22, of this year, some young men were bathing in Sac river, in the vicinity of Gray's mill, about nine miles from Springfield. Two of them were named Willis Wynn and Wm. Birt. The former was a son of R. M. Wynn, a justice of the peace of Jackson township. Birt had come into the country from Arkansas a few months previously. Each of the two was about 18 years of age. While the bathers were sporting in the water Wynn "ducked" Birt. This made Birt angry and a quarrel followed after the parties came on the shore. Each drew his knife, but their companions interfered, and they then agreed to fight it out, "fist and skull." It seems that while Wynn laid aside his knife, Birt kept his. Wynn knocked Birt down and jumped upon him. There was a struggle on the ground, which was ended by Birt's stabbing Wynn three times, once in the region of the heart. Wynn died within a few minutes.

Birt was arrested the same evening and the next day brought to Springfield, whereupon examination before the mayor, he was held to bail in the sum of $5,000. At the Augast term of the circuit court he was tried and found guilty of murder in the first degree. But the youth of the defendant and some mitigating circumstances connected with the killing of young Wynn, created a sympathy for Birt, and a pretty general belief that the verdict was too severe, and that a few years' confinement, in the penitentiary would be sufficient for all the purposes of justice, was shared by the judge and he granted a new trial in November, when the jury, with substantially the same testimony, although with somewhat different instructions, found the defendant "not guilty" of any offense, whatever!

MURDER OF JOHN MARSHALL.

About the 26th of November a man named John Marshall, was brutally murdered in a saloon in the eastern part of the county, near the line of the railroad, by two men named James Haggerty and Thomas Carroll. All of the parties were railroaders, and the murder was the result of a drunken quarrel over a small sum of money. Haggarty was arrested at once and confined in jail and Carroll was apprehended a few days later. In June, 1870, Haggerty pleaded guilty to manslaughter in the second decree and was sentenced to four years in the penitentiary. [519]

FATAL ACCIDENT TO ARNOLD HELTON.

On the 10th of November a fatal accident occurred to Mr. Arnold Helton, a citizen of the western part of the county and who was on his way home from Springfield. Mr. Helton had started home on a load of lumber. He had been drinking freely and was considerably under the influence of liquor. Silas Ray, one of his neighbors, was riding with him. They were near Fulbright's spring when Mr. Helton fell from the wagon and was run over by the wheel passing over his breast, crushing him so that he died in about half an hour. Mr. Helton was a man of considerable property and not in the habit of drinking. [520]


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