History of Greene County, Missouri
1883

R. I. Holcombe, Editing Historian


Chapter 15
History of the County from 1870 to 1875

Part 1
1870 — Miscellaneous Tragedies — The Kansas City and Memphis Railroad Subscription — Completion of the South Pacific Railroad to Springfield — Celebration of the Event — The Political Campaign of 1870 — The Conventions and the Canvass — The "Possum" Policy — The Liberals — Universal Amnesty and Impartial Suffrage — Defeat of the Radicals at the November Election and Enfranchisement of all the "Rebels" — Killing of "Ev" Hollingsworth — Items.


1870—MISCELLANEOUS.

Homicide.—On New Year's Day an affray occurred in the "Humboldt Saloon in Springfield, which resulted in the death of one Owen Monday at the hands of Michael Connery. Both men had been drinking, and the affray resulted from a former quarrel. Connery stabbed Monday four times about the head and neck. Not long thereafter Connery pleaded guilty to manslaughter and was given five years in the penitentiary. Monday lived four or five days, and before his death bequeathed about $500 to the Catholics of Springfield to be expended in the purchase of cemetery grounds, and a small sum was given to go towards erecting a residence for the priest. During the war Monday was in charge of the telegraph line between Springfield and Rolla. Connery (or Conway) was a saddler and in the employ of McAdams & Co.

Robbery.—About the 20th of February a soldier's widow living in Taylor township was robbed of her pension money amounting to $350, by two villains who piled brush at her door and threatened to burn down her house unless she gave them the money, which she had hidden in an old house near by. They had revolvers and were disguised by having their faces blackened. They also threatened to murder the lady if she did not give them her money.

Suicide.— On the 21st of September John R. Kelso, jr., a boy 14 years of age and a son of Hon. John R. Kelso, ex-M. C., committed suicide by shooting himself with a pistol, and his body was found in a ravine close by his father's house, not far from Springfield. It seemed from the statements of the family, that the boy had killed himself because his sister had discovered that he was using tobacco, a habit which his father had forbidden him to practice, and which he had promised to abandon.

A Colored Jury.—The first colored jury ever sworn and impaneled in Greene county was convened before Esq. Beiderlinden, of Springfield, in June 1870. The case was that of Mary Button vs. John Jones, and was a controversy for the possession of a house.

A Horrible Deed.—About the 1st of June it was reported that one R. G. Andrews committed a nameless crime, his victim being a Mrs. Dummer, 60 years of age, who lived in old Fort No. 1, near Springfield. He was said to have met Mrs. Dummer on her way to the depot and accomplished his purpose by threats of murder.

Deaths.— June 15th, Benjamin Shockley, aged 73. —Sept. 12th, in Springfield, Mrs. C. W. Baker, wife of Judge James Baker.

THE KANSAS CITY AND MEMPHIS RAILROAD.

There was great interest taken in this county this year, in regard to the proposed building of a railroad from Kansas City to Memphis, Tenn., via Springfield. The people were almost universally in favor of the project, and numerous meetings in its aid were held. On the last day of May numerously signed petitions were presented to the county court, asking that body to subscribe $400,000 stock in the Kansas City and Memphis Railroad, on certain conditions set forth in the petitions, one of which conditions was to submit the question to a vote of the tax-payers. At that time everybody seemed in favor of the subscription, and nobody against it. After deliberating on the matter for two days, the court, in full session, Judges Benj. Kite, G. M. McElhannon and R. P. Matthews being present, made the subscription on the conditions set forth. It is this subscription that is still in litigation between the county and the bondholders. [521]

In October, the court modified and changed its order of subscription. Among other things, L. H. Murray was appointed to act as the county's agent in the matter of transferring the bonds to the Hannibal and St. Jo. Railroad Company—really the other party in interest, but represented by the "K. C. and M. R. R.," a corporation within a corporation, "a wheel within a wheel." S. G. Appleby and M. K. Smith were appointed assistant commissioners to act with Murray, a majority of the three to constitute a quorum, and to be under the especial instructions of the court. The following is a copy of the order of the court, making the subscription:

Ordered by the court in full session, That the county of Greene, in the State of Missouri, take and does hereby subscribe four thousand shares of the denomination of one hundred dollars each, amounting in the aggregate to four hundred thousand dollars, to the capital stock of the Kansas City and Memphis Railroad Company; provided, however, that said stock is taken and subscribed upon the following express conditions, viz.

First. The said stock, amounting to the sum of four hundred thousand dollars, shall be paid in the coupon bonds of the county of Greene, maturing in twenty years after the date thereof, bearing interest, payable semi-annually, at the rate of seven per cent per annum, both principal and interest payable at the Bank of Commerce in the city of New York; said bonds to be signed by the presiding justice of this court, and attested by the clerk, under the seal of the court, and the coupons attached to be attested or signed by the clerk.

Second. None of said bonds shall be signed, issued or delivered until the road-bed of said railroad shall be completed,—that is to say, the grading, bridging, and masonry thereon,—to the northern line of Greene county. And when the county court shall he fully satisfied and officially informed of the completion of the road-bed, as aforesaid, to the county line aforesaid, the presiding justice of this court shall sign, issue and deliver to said company, through its legally organized bonds as aforesaid, amounting to one hundred thousand dollars. And when said company shall complete the road-bed of said road to the city of Springfield, as aforesaid, then said company shall secure the further sum of one hundred thousand dollars, in said bonds. And when said company shall complete their road-bed as aforesaid southwardly from Springfield to the county line, in the direction of Memphis, then the said company shall receive the further sum of one hundred thousand dollars, of said bonds, to be issued and delivered as aforesaid. When said company shall have their cars running to the city of Springfield, then said company shall receive the balance of said bonds, amounting to one hundred thousand dollars, issued and delivered as aforesaid. [522]

Third. It is further expressly stipulated that the depot of said road shall be located and established within one-half mile of the court-house or public square of Springfield; provided that the city or citizens of Springfield shall secure and place at the disposal of said company sufficient and suitable grounds for the purpose of a depot and depot yards, for said company.

The bonds herein provided for shall be delivered by the duly authorized commissioners or agent, to be hereafter appointed by this court, and simultaneously with the delivery of said bonds, or any portion thereof, by said company, there shall be issued and delivered to said company, to the commissioner aforesaid, a corresponding amount of the paid up stock of said company to Greene county.

It is said that the original draft of the order was written by Hon. T. A. Sherwood, now one of the judges of the Supreme Court.

COMPLETION OF THE PACIFIC RAILROAD TO SPRINGFIELD.

For some time the work of constructing the Southwest branch of the old Atlantic and Pacific Railroad through Greene county had been in progress, and the locomotive drawing the construction train had been slowly creeping forward. At last, on the 21st of April, the iron horse reached a point where now North Springfield is halted, as if to gather his wind, and snorted violently and in triumph that the journey which he had been twenty years in making was at last finished, and the long hoped for Pacific road (at this writing called the St. Louis and San Francisco) had its terminus at Springfield.

This was the same road for which a tax of $20,000 had been levied and paid by this county in 1856, but at the commencement of the war the road was only completed as far as Rolla, and as the original company were unable to fulfil their contract and complete the road, it fell into the hands of the State authorities, from whom, in 1866, it was purchased by John C. Fremont for $1,300,000.

But this sale to Gen. Fremont did not result in the completion of the road to Springfield. The first installment of $325,000 was promptly paid, and the road was completed as far as Little Piney; but when the second payment fell due, Fremont was unable to meet it, and the road again reverted back to the State. [523]

During all these years, staging and hauling goods in wagons from Rolla, were among the inconveniences from which the county suffered. The overland stage route to California had been continued through up to 1861, but after the war was never re-established. There was, however, a continuous line of stages to Fort Smith, Arkansas, and the telegraph line to that place was still continued. Up to the close of the war the telegraph was controlled by Federal authority, but in 1867, as before stated, it was purchased by a private company of citizens of Springfield.

Soon after Fremont's failure and the relinquishment of his claim to the railroad, New York and Boston capitalists began to be interested in the building of a number of roads in the South and West, and, in 1868, a company of Eastern men purchased this line and soon completed it through this State, to Vinita, in the Indian Territory.

During the war when Col. S. H. Boyd was in Congress, he visited President Lincoln and Secretary Stanton, and got their consent that the Federal government should complete the road from Rolla to Springfield, as a "war measure," to be used chiefly in the transportation of troops and supplies until the war should end. When it was expected that the citizens would gladly take it off the hands of the government. The project was defeated, however, by Gen. Curtis who represented to the authorities at Washington that the cost of constructing, maintaining, and garrisoning the road would largely exceed the benefits likely to be derived therefrom by the government and these representations were perhaps true, although it might have served a good purpose at the time of the Price raid in transporting troops to the Southwestern part of the State to head off the Confederates when they retreated.

GRAND OPENING OF THE PACIFIC RAILROAD.

Soon after the completion of the railroad to Springfield, it was arranged to have a grand opening of the same. An excursion was gotten up, many notables invited, the day fixed, and early on Tuesday morning, May 3, 1870, citizens from the town and country began to gather at the depot to witness the arrival of the excursion train from St. Louis, and participate in the opening ceremonies. Among them were many who had never seen a locomotive or a railroad car. They had lived long lives on the verge of civilization, and were now for the first time to be overtaken by the locomotive, and catch a glimpse of its wonderful proportions. Of course, the hour for the arrival of the train was waited for with intense interest. All were interested in beholding the novel sight of a train of passenger cars approaching Springfield, and when the long train came in sight, there was great cheering from the assembled multitudes, mingled with the loud bellowings of the huge guns which gave the grand salute. The cars were beautiful ones, and the locomotives were tastefully decorated with numerous small flags, flowers and wreaths of evergreen. The sight was a grand one, and will long be remembered by all who witnessed it. [524]

By some mistake on the part of the railroad authorities to notify the citizens when the train would arrive, no carriages were in waiting to convey the guests over to "Old Town," and the party, numbering about 400, among whom were a number of ladies, had to trudge the entire distance on foot. The journey was a hot and dusty one, but at length all reached the public square, where at about two o'clock the crowd assembled around a stand erected in front of the court- house to listen to the reception speeches and responses. Upon the stand were the Governor, Lieut. Governor, Secretary of State, Speaker of the House of Representatives, and many other distinguished citizens of the State, besides the president and managing director of the road.

On motion of Hon. S. H. Boyd, Governor McClurg was elected to preside, and D. C. Kennedy and H. E. Havens, chosen secretaries. On motion the following gentlemen were appointed vice presidents: Hon. R. T. VanHorn, Hon. T. C. Fletcher, Hon. J. S. Phelps, Lieut. Gov. Stanard, Hon. S. W. Headlee, Hon. L. A. Rountree, Hon. D. S. Jewett, Hon. John Hogan, Hon. L. R. Shyrock and B. W. Jameson.

Prayer was offered by Rev. A. Greenman. Hon. John S. Phelps was introduced by the chairman, and delivered a welcoming speech. Francis B. Hayes, president of the road, was introduced, and responded to the address of Mr. Phelps.

Ex-Governor Thos. C. Fletcher was next introduced, and addressed the meeting at considerable length in eloquent and appropriate remarks.

A rain storm coming up, the meeting adjourned to the City Hall, where addresses were made by Chauncey I. Filley, of St. Louis, John C. Orrick, Speaker of the House of Representatives, Governor McClurg, Hon. R. T. Van Horn of Kansas City, L. B. Shryock, Hon. D. T. Jewett, Hon. E. O. Stanard, and Hon. John Hogan, of St. Louis; and J. Milton Turner, of Jefferson City, all of whom spoke of the great importance and superiority of this route to the Pacific, and congratulated the people of the Southwest upon the opening of the road to Springfield. [525]

After speeches by Hon. S. H. Boyd, Mr. Pope and Senator Headlee the meeting adjourned. Many of the visitors returned by the 6 o'clock train, but a large number remained over and attended a ball in the evening at the City Hall.

By the 19th of May trains were running between St. Louis and Springfield on regular time, and every day about one hundred cars, including those containing railroad supplies, were received and handled at the latter point. Many a man and woman, too, of mature years, saw at Springfield this year, for the first time, a locomotive and train of cars. Many a trip of some miles was made purposely to see "the steam kyars."

THE POLITICAL CANVASS AND ELECTION OF 1870.

No more important or exciting political contest ever came off in Greene county, not even in Presidential years, than that in the year 1870. The contest was between the regular Republicans or "Radicals " on the one side and the Liberal Republicans and Democrats on the other, and extended throughout the State.

The questions of universal amnesty and enfranchisement, of the repeal of the Missouri ironclad oath for voters, jurymen, ministers, lawyers, teachers, etc., were rapidly sowing the seeds of discord and disintegration in the Republican party in the State, dividing it into two "wings" as they were called, Radical and Liberal; the former maintaining the extreme and the latter the more magnanimous policy in regard to those who by word or deed, or both, had had complicity, with the rebellion.

THE RADICAL CONGRESSIONAL CONVENTION IN SPRINGFIELD.

July 25th the Republican Congressional Convention for this district (then the 4th) met at Springfield. Col. Dale, of Neosho, presided. The candidates before the convention were H. E. Havens, of Greene, and S. W. Sennett, of Jasper. Hon. S. H. Boyd was voted for in the convention, but had withdrawn his name as a candidate. Mr. Havens was nominated by a large majority.

Speeches were made by Col. J. J. Gravelly and others. Gravelly's speech was very "Liberal," so much so that some of the delegates termed it a good Democratic speech, and Capt. White, of Barry, called out to the Colonel: "How much do the Democrats pay you for speaking for them?" The convention was Radical to the core, and the following were among the resolutions adopted: [526]

7. The obligation of the nation to its brave defenders during the late war for national existence, is of the most sacred and binding character, and we favor a liberal payment of bounties and pensions to disabled soldiers, and to the widows and orphans of the gallant dead.

8. That respecting the unity and harmony of the Radical party throughout the State, we pledge ourselves to act in accord with the action and platform of the coming Radical State Convention.

12. The question of enfranchising rebels, as presented by the proposed suffrage amendment to our State constitution, should not be considered a test of fidelity to the Radical party, and we recognize the right of any citizen to act upon it according to the dictates of his own judgment.

THE REPUBLICAN COUNTY CONVENTION OF 1870.

For some time the breach between the two factions of the Republican party in this county had been widening, and when the county convention convened on August 22d, to select delegates to the State convention, there was, to borrow a slang expression, "music in them air." Both factions were represented in the convention, although the Radicals were largely in the majority. The wily Democrats kept aloof, knowing that their hopes of success depended entirely on the distraction, disruption and division of the Republicans, and a union with the Liberal wing, which favored the enfranchising of so many men who would vote the Democratic ticket if allowed to vote at all.

The convention was called to order by "Alphabet" Mack, and Maj. L. P. Downing presided. Matters went smoothly enough until the committee appointed to select delegates to the State convention reported. Mr. Rice, on behalf of a majority of the committee, reported the following for delegates:

Pond Creek township, Hugh Boyd; Clay, B. H. Kershner; Taylor, F. E. Watterson; Jackson, A. J. Potter; Cass, N. H. McGill; Boone, J. Longcrier; Center, R. D. Nicholson; Robberson, S. W. Headlee; Campbell, J. P. Ellis, W. F. Geiger, J. H. Rector (colored) and Edgar Pitts (colored)—all Radicals. [527]

Thereupon Gen. Mullings, representing the minority of the committee composed of himself, W. L. Mack, and J. J. Campbell, presented a report recommending the insertion in the room of any of the six names presented by the majority of the following names: H. G. Mullings, S. N. Ingram, W. L. Mack, E. A. Andrews, H. J. Lindenbower, and M. H. Williams.

Immediately the "music" struck up. Mullings advocated a division of the delegation, and said if this were not done he would not be bound by the action of the convention. Mr. Creighton led the fight for the radicals. He declared that the delegation was already divided, as five of those whose names were reported were known to be in favor of the suffrage amendments to be submitted at the ensuing election, and he believed that the majority should rule, and not be dictated to by the factious minority. A noisy discussion followed, and at last on motion, the townships were called on the adoption of the amendment, and the vote stood as follows: ayes 7; noes 21. Mr. Rountree then moved the adoption of the majority report. The vote was taken by townships, and stood as follows: ayes 21; noes 7.

Mullings then attempted to have a resolution passed giving certain instructions to the delegates. On this resolution he spoke at some length, being frequently interrupted. To this resolution at last Creighton offered an amendment pending the consideration of which the convention adjourned amid great confusion and excitement.

Knowing that the trouble would be increased tenfold by an attempt to nominate county officers in a convention, the Republican party managers left the selection to a primary election, which was held September 17th and resulted in the choice of the following ticket:

For representative 1st district, F. E. Watterson; for representative 2d district, R. D. O. Nicholson; clerk of the circuit court, R. A. C. Mack; clerk of the county court, Al. Demuth; clerk of the probate and common pleas court, J. W. McCullah ; recorder, Chas. Lisenby; sheriff, A. J. Potter; treasurer, A. F. Ingram; county court justice, N. B. Turner; assessor, S. R. Waddill; school superintendent, C. W. Crawford; coroner, R. P. Burns; surveyor, I. N. Jones. [528]

The Liberals bestirred themselves. On the 22d of September they had a grand jubilee at Springfield, at which B. Gratz Brown, was the principal speaker, followed by Col. W. E. Gilmore. At the Republican State Convention at Jefferson, August 31st, there had been an open disruption of the party. Headed by Carl Schurz, 250 of the delegates withdrew from the regular convention, formed another, and nominated a full State ticket headed by B. Gratz Brown for Governor and Col. Wm. E. Gilmore, of this county, for Lieutenant Governor. Owing to the shortness of time he had lived in the State, Gilmore was disqualified for the place, and Col. J. J. Gravelly was substituted.

The Liberal Republican Congressional convention for this district was held in Springfield, Sept. 23. Col. Wm. E. Gilmore was nominated for Congress, and thus, as in 1868, both candidates for Congress were from Greene county. The resolutions adopted by the convention were these:

Be it resolved by the Liberal Republican party of the 4th Congressional District in convention assembled:

1st. That we heartily indorse the platform of principles adopted by the Liberal Republican party of the State which nominated B. Gratz Brown, of Missouri, and pledge our mutual support to such platform of principles and the candidates nominated by said convention.

2d. That we are earnestly in favor of a reduction of the present tariff rates on sugar, coffee, tea, salt, iron, and all other articles of common consumption among the people.

The third resolution favored the equalization of bounties bill, to pay to each soldier $8.33 for every month he served in the Union army during the war.

The Liberals held their county convention September 26th. Maj. R. J. McElhany presided and W. R. Gorton was secretary. The following county ticket was nominated: Representative of the 2d district, H. G. Mullings; representative of the 1st district, J. H. Langston; clerk of the circuit court, S. N. Ingram; county clerk, B. F. Partridge; sheriff, James Long; recorder, A. Vangeuder; county justice, George W. Brittain; treasurer, Jared E. Smith; school superintendent, J. J. Bunch; surveyor, I. N. Jones.

The Democrats—the wily Democrats—made no regular nominations, but suggested names to be voted for to fill three or four offices, and although the Liberals had nominated a full ticket, except for probate clerk, it was understood that the candidates for sheriff, circuit clerk, and county judge were not to be voted for, a trade having been consummate with the Democrats by the terms of which they (the Democrats) were to support the Liberal ticket entire, State, Congressional and county, except in the case of the four offices named and to fill these the Liberals—or a large majority of them—agreed to vote for E. D. Ott for probate clerk, M. J. Hubble for circuit clerk, C. B. Owen for sheriff, and Ralph Walker for county judge. Both Democrats and Liberals seemed to think half a loaf better than no bread. [529]

The Democrats worked their "possum policy" very adroitly. Leading Democrats made no speeches, but greatly assisted the Liberals. Judge R. W. Fyan, Col. J. J. Gravelly, Col. Gilmore and others stamped the county, and November 3, Carl Schurz spoke in Springfield. Hons. H. E. Havens and J. W. Sennett represented the regular Republicans, and were assisted by the local talent. October 27th Senator Chas. D. Drake spoke at Springfield in aid of the regular Republican ticket, headed by J. W. McClurg for Governor.

The Legislature the previous winter had submitted certain amendments to the people, three of which had for their object the repealing of the provisions of the "Drake Constitution" establishing the "oath of loyalty" for jurors and voters, and abolishing certain disqualifications on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude or on account of former acts of disloyalty. For these amendments all of the Liberals and Democrats and a majority of the regular Republicans of this county were expected to vote. But many Republicans were still opposed to allowing "rebels" and "rebel sympathizers" to vote, hold office, or sit on juries, as the vote in this county will show.

The Liberals headed their tickets with the motto, "Love is Stronger than Hate." and the burthen of their speeches was opposition to "the principles of eternal hate." They made reference to the fact that while President Grant had an ex-Confederate officer, Col. A. T. Akerman, in his Cabinet, out in Missouri a poor ignorant, perhaps deluded, rebel could not even vote.

As the November election, 1870, forms an important epoch in the history of Missouri, marking the period at which the Republicans, for eight years the dominant party, surrendered their power, which they have not since been able to regain, the vote of Greene county is herewith given by townships, on the three notable constitutional amendments and for the principal officers: [530]

 

Governor

Constitutional Amendments

Congress

Representatives

 

 

Second

Fourth

Fifth

 

1st Dist.

2d Dist.

Townships

McClurg, R.

Brown, L.

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

NO

Havens, R.

Gilmore, L.

Watterson, R.

Langston, L.

Nicholson, R.

Mullings, L.

Cass

64

68

90

23

93

23

91

20

55

70

0

0

55

65

Clay

31

37

43

17

41

17

56

14

23

40

26

40

0

0

Center

73

58

79

36

78

34

78

36

58

62

0

0

58

58

Jackson

84

55

82

3

68

19

34

41

79

55

0

0

80

43

Robberson

65

134

138

28

138

38

115

57

58

128

0

0

52

118

Taylor

56

33

87

49

38

49

37

50

55

34

50

26

0

0

Pond Creek

64

16

17

57

18

58

18

58

62

17

63

17

0

0

Wilson

27

92

99

10

99

9

99

9

25

89

23

95

0

0

Boone, 1st Dist.

70

43

49

44

49

47

48

46

63

47

0

0

47

52

Boone, 2d Dist.

47

70

75

32

76

35

72

33

46

69

0

0

47

69

Campbell, North Div'n.

241

350

460

19

423

109

438

60

218

376

239

355

0

0

Campbell, South Div'n.

210

254

358

19

355

77

349

37

172

271

177

274

0

0

Total

1042

1210

1577

337

1456

514

1424

463

914

1261

578

807

339

405

  

 

Clerk Circ't C't.1

Clerk Co. Court

Sheriff2

Treasurer

Co. Judge3

School Supt.

Townships

Mack, R.

Hubble, L.

Demuth, R.

Partridge, L.

Potter, R.

Owen, L.

Ingram, R.

Smith, L.

Turner, R.

Walker, L.

Crawford, R.

Bunch, L.

Cass

53

73

59

73

63

69

58

74

55

73

58

74

Clay

29

31

24

39

28

41

25

42

28

37

27

40

Center

70

56

68

58

67

61

70

60

62

55

73

57

Jackson

82

50

80

52

88

51

80

54

80

45

80

55

Robberson

66

120

60

122

70

117

61

137

57

136

58

133

Taylor

53

27

54

33

59

27

56

32

58

21

56

33

Pond Creek

65

10

62

16

61

13

64

16

51

0

64

16

Wilson

28

93

30

85

13

108

25

97

23

90

24

97

Boone, 1st Dist.

54

43

76

37

69

23

68

51

65

44

65

48

Boone, 2d Dist.

47

68

55

62

45

69

46

68

19

88

51

62

Campbell, North Div.

312

213

213

280

226

227

248

352

211

311

256

341

Campbell South Div.

229

197

254

194

199

210

206

249

183

230

233

223

Total

1088

999

1135

1051

988

1016

1007

1219

891

1133

1045

1179

——————
1 S. N. Ingram received 167 votes for circuit clerk.
2 James Long received 271 votes for sheriff.
3. G. W. Brittain received 200 votes for county justice.
———————

The result of the election was the choice of for representatives, J. W. Langston and Hosea Mullings, Liberals; R. A. C. L. Mack, Radical, clerk of the circuit court; Al. Demuth, Radical, clerk of the county court; Eli D. Ott, Democratic Liberal, clerk of the probate and common pleas court; Chas. B. Owen, Democratic Liberal, sheriff; Jared E. Smith, Liberal, treasurer; Ralph Walker, Democratic Liberal, county court justice; J. T. Walker, Liberal, county assessor; J. Jay Bunch, Liberal, superintendent of schools. [531]

The 2d constitutional amendment abolished the "oath of loyalty" for jurors; the 4th abolished the "oath of loyalty" for voters; the 5th removed certain disqualifications on account of "race, color, or previous condition of servitude," and on account of "former acts of disloyalty."

In the State the amendments carried by overwhelming majorities. Brown was elected over McClurg by a majority of 41,038. In this congressional district, Havens, regular Republican, defeated Gilmore by a large majority.

MURDER OF A. HOLLINGSWORTH BY O. B. REED.

On the 22d of April, 1870, A. Hollingsworth, an old citizen of this county, 74 years of age, and formerly marshal of Springfield, and county jailer—well known as "Uncle Ev.,''—was killed a few miles south of Springfield by another old man named O. B. Reed, of Christian county. It seemed that Reed had been to town with a load of lumber, and became intoxicated. He then started home, having a bottle of whisky in his pocket. He was next seen lying in the road a few miles from town by some one who passed on to Mr. Hollingsworth's house, a short distance and informed him that a drunken man was lying in a helpless condition and ought to be taken care of. Mr. Hollingsworth repaired to the spot, where he found Reed entirely helpless, having apparently fallen from the wagon, and his team tangled in the brush and his wagon broken. Mr, Hollingsworth took a coffee pot from the wagon and filled it with water, at the branch near by, and proceeded to bathe the head and wrists of Reed. He was thus engaged when Mr. W. H. Patterson, who witnessed the remainder of the affair, rode up on horseback. The effect of the cold water revived Reed so that he rose on his elbow, and began to abuse Hollingsworth, asking him if he wanted to fight, etc. Mr. Hollingsworth paid little attention to him and proceeded to pour the water on Reed's head, when the latter sprang to his feet, drew a knife and attempted to stab Hollingsworth, the latter retreating slowly for a distance of about thirty yards, closely pursued by Reed, who finally caught Hollingsworth with his left hand and struck him five times with the knife. When Mr. Patterson discovered that Reed was using a knife, he immediately jumped from his horse, caught him and tried to take the knife from him. Failing in this, he jerked him down, placed his foot upon his wrist and, with a stone, broke the blade of the knife. Patterson then assisted Hollinsworth to get upon his horse. Reed, in the mean time, attempted another assault, when Patterson threw him in a branch where he left him. [532]

Dr. Barrett was sent for to attend Hollingsworth and at first it was hoped his life might be saved. He, however, died the second day afterward. He was aged about 74, unusually stout and vigorous. The two were strangers to each other and no cause of quarrel existed between them. Reed was an old gray-headed man, feeble in appearance, with every indication of being inoffensive and harmless. He said he had no recollection of anything that passed after he left town until in the night when he awoke and found himself in a strange room under guard.

On preliminary examination before Justice Hubbard, Reed was committed to jail to await the action of the grand jury. He was afterwards tried and sentenced to three years' imprisonment in the penitentiary, but was soon pardoned by the Governor.

ITEMS.

In February, 1870, an abstract of the taxable property of the county, taken from the assessor's books, showed a total valuation of $6,241,648.

On the 21st of April the colored people celebrated the ratification of the 15th amendment by a grand mass meeting, procession, etc., in Springfield. J. H. Rector was president of the day. Addresses were delivered by Rector, Rev. Reed, and J. Milton Turner, colored, and by W. D. Hubbard, Col. Gilmore and Col. Mack, white. A few days later, however, Rector was expelled from the city omnibus by reason of his color.

May 14th the first man was killed by the cars at North Springfield. His name was said to be Patrick Dorland, and many thought his death a case of suicide.

The town of Ash Grove was incorporated February 2d, of this year, and North Springfield was incorporated July 12th.


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