History of Greene County, Missouri
1883

R. I. Holcombe, Editing Historian


Chapter 15
History of the County from 1870 to 1875

Part 2
1871 — Miscellany — Murder of Judge Lindenbower — The Armstrong-Baughman Tragedy — The Crime and Lynching of "Bud" Isbell — The Railroad Bonds. 1872 — Items — Special Election — The Presidential Election — Greeley "Crow" for the Democrats — Official Vote. 1873 — Dedication of the Bailey Monument — Miscellaneous — Lynching of Green Buis at Walnut Grove — The Grange and the Grangers — The Panic. 1874 — The "Tadpole" Campaign.


Early in January a meeting of citizens of the county was held at Springfield for the purpose of organizing an anti-horse-thief society to protect farmers and others from the depredations of horse thieves. Wm. Massey was chosen chairman and C. F. Leavitt acted as secretary. Geo. Lawrence, John Young, and C. F. Leavitt were appointed a committee to draft a plan of organization.

In May, Ash Grove and North Springfield were re-incorporated by the county court! Both towns had improved largely the first year of their official existence, and were still improving.

In the fall of the year there was a long and excessive drouth in the county. No rain fell from about the first of August until October 8th.

John Hursh died in November, and December 16th Hon. John W. Hancock, who, prior to the war, was a well known politician, in this county and Southwest Missouri, died at his home in Paris, Texas. Col. Hancock was long a citizen of Greene county, and is frequently mentioned elsewhere in these pages.

UNDER THE ROSES THE BLUE.

Decoration Day of this year was observed by a procession to the National cemetery, an address by Dr. Thos. U. Flanner, and the decoration of the graves of the soldiers by the young ladies. In the procession there were tableau cars and other interesting features.

UNDER THE LILIES THE GRAY.

June 21st the graves of the Confederate dead near Springfield were decorated very beautifully and very bountifully. There was no procession, however. An oration was delivered by Col. R. H. Musser, of Brunswick. Gens. Marmaduke and Shelby were expected to be present, but they failed to come. In the evening a reception was given at the City Hall. Addresses were delivered by Hon. Thos. C. Reynolds, ex-Lieutenant Governor of the State, and Hon. John S. Phelps, and letters from a number of prominent ex-Confederates, including Jeff. Davis, were read.

MURDER OF JUDGE H. J. LINDENBOWER.

January 24th, 1871, one Wm. Cannefax shot and killed Judge Harrison J. Lindenbower in a saloon near the court-house, in Springfield. The murder was in broad daylight and in the presence of witnesses, from whose statements this account has been derived. The judge was either seated upon or resting one foot on a barrel talking to another gentleman, when Cannefax approached him and asked:

"Well, what are you going to do about that land?" Lindenbower replied, "O, you go and see your lawyer and let him attend to it for you." Immediately Cannefax stepped behind Lindenbower and opened on him with his revolver, shooting three times. At the first fire Lindenbower sprang up and cried out in great agony and ran wildly about the room a few seconds, when he fell and expired. [533-534]

As stated to the writer, Cannefax's enmity towards Lindenbower was occasioned by the following circumstances. During the war Benj. Cannefax, an uncle of William, went South, and abandoned his home in this county. He was somewhat involved and during his absence suit was brought against him by his creditors, judgment rendered against him by default, and his land, a fine farm, south of Springfield, was levied upon and sold. Judge Lindenbower was the purchaser or one of the purchasers. Afterwards William Cannefax came forward and claimed as rightfully his a portion of the land purchased by Lindenbower, alleging that he, Cannefax, had conveyed it to his uncle some time before in order that certain creditors might not seize it, but that the sale had been, and was so understood to be, a sham sale. Cannefax urged Lindenbower to let him have his portion of the land back again, but Lindenbower refused to give up his title unless the matter was properly adjudicated in the courts. This irritated Cannefax, and led to the commission of the crime before described.

Judge Lindenbower was a native of Ohio, and at the time of his death was only about 35 years of age. He had been a resident of Springfield since 1858. He was a lawyer by profession, a Republican in politics, and his public career is mentioned on other pages of this history. He was a shrewd speculator and was in a fair way to amass a competence when he was killed. Cannefax occupied a humble position in the community, and was a small farmer. He was of middle age, and was an old citizen of Greene county, his father, Joseph Cannefax, being one of the first settlers.

Cannefax was arrested, indicted for murder in the first degree, and committed to jail. He secured a chance of venue to Taney county, but the next June he and three other prisoners broke jail at Springfield and made their escape. In July, 1874, he returned, was re-arrested by Sheriff Potter after quite a struggle and arraigned, and his trial coming on at Forsyth, on the advice of his counsel, J. C. Cravens, Esq., he pleaded guilty to the charge of murder in the second degree and was sentenced to the penitentiary for life. [535]

The murder of Judge Lindenbower horrified and greatly incensed the people. He was a man of prominence and high character and there seemed to be no sort of extenuation or palliation for his untimely taking off. His reputation as a sharp trader was well known, and there were those who said that he sometimes drove a hard bargain, but always a fair one, and this seems to have been all that was ever said in his disfavor.

Two days after his death the bar of Greene county met to do honor to the memory of Judge Lindenbower. John S. Phelps presided and J. C. Cravens was secretary. Resolutions were unanimously adopted setting forth that Lindenbower had been "basely murdered in the prime of his manhood and usefulness," and declaring that in life he had been "an able and honorable member of our profession, an affable and courteous gentleman, a trustworthy friend, and an estimable citizen." The following attorneys were selected as pall-bearers: Hons. John S. Phelps, John S. Waddill, J. R. Show, W. F. Geiger, Thos. A. Sherwood, C. F. Leavitt, J. R. Milner, O. R. Travers.

THE ARMSTRONG-BAUGHMAN TRAGEDY.

July 20th Constable Jacob Baughman, of Campbell township, went to the eastern part of the county to arrest a man named John Armstrong, who lived near Strafford. Baughman took with him R. M. Jones and his son Henry, both of whom lived in the neighborhood, and were not on friendly terms with Armstrong. The party arrived at Armstrong's about daybreak. Armstrong had been sick for some days, and was lying on the floor. Baughman punched the prostrate man with his cane and told him to get up and go to Springfield with him. Armstrong replied by ordering the entire party to leave his house.

One of the Jones' presented a pistol, which was caught by a Mrs. Pritchard, a sister-in-law of Armstrong's, residing in the house with him. A confused struggle between all of the parties followed, during which Armstrong and Baughman were shot, both fatally. Armstrong was shot by Henry Jones, who fired a charge of buckshot into his victim's body, killing him instantly. It was not certain at the time who shot Baughman, but there were those who believed R. M. Jones did it accidentally, while be was struggling with Mrs. Pritchard. Baughman died next day. The Jones were arrested and admitted to bail.

THE CRIME AND RANGING OF "BUD" ISBELL.

On the 19th of June in this year (1871), a young negro, aged about 21, named Isbell, commonly called 11 "Bud" Isbell, went to the house of Peter A. Christian, a laborer, who lived near the old fort in Springfield, and asked Mrs. Christian for a drink of water. Mrs. C. was alone and handing the negro a cup, she directed him to the well near by. The negro returned from the well in a few moments, and confronting Mrs. Christian, knowing that she was alone and unprotected, made to her an outrageous proposal. The lady refused, but being a small and frail woman, and no help being near, she was wholly at the brute's mercy, and of course he rendered her none. The tale is best told briefly.

As soon as possible Mrs. Christian gave an alarm, but the negro had fled. A reward was offered for his apprehension, parties went in pursuit, and telegrams were sent to other points. Five days later, or Saturday, June 19th, two men from Newton county, came into Springfield with Isbell, whom they had captured near Newtonia. He was taken into the presence of Mrs. Christian and conclusively identified. He was then brought to the public square, and an excited crowd soon gathered about him. After a noisy and violent discussion for half an hour, the crowd decided to handle the black- skinned and black-hearted ravisher, and he was speedily trotted off to the northwest across "Jordan," and to near the spot where, twelve years before, Mart. Danforth was hung for a similar offense. Arriving at a suitable tree, the negro was placed on a horse. Then one end of a rope was fastened about his neck, and the other tied to the limb of a tree. The horse was then led away, and "Bud" dropped so low that his feet touched the ground, and he had to be lifted up and the rope shortened, before he would swing clear. After hanging a short time some one in the crowd fired a shot into him, and he was soon after a corpse. After he was dead the crowd dispersed. The coroner soon arrived and took charge of the remains. The jury returned a verdict that the deceased had come to his death by being both hung and shot by three men (whom they named), assisted by many others.

There was no effort on the part of the officers of the law to interfere with the lynching. It was stated that the sheriff of the county and the mayor and marshal of the city were on the public square when the crowd was considering what action to take in the premises. At the place of hanging, Maj. R. B. Chappel addressed the crowd, advising the members thereof to make full and careful investigation of the prisoner's guilt before proceeding to extremes, and if it should be determined that he was guilty and ought to be hung, then let him be taken out of town, and so disposed of. But the major's motives were misconstrued, and several revolvers were drawn on him with the adjuration to "dry up." [537]

Isbell seemed little concerned. As stated, he was about 21 years of age and was ignorant and brutal. There was no doubt of his guilt in the particular case mentioned, and he was accused of having perpetrated the same crime on a young colored girl a short time previously.

THE KANSAS CITY AND MEMPHIS R. R. BONDS.

During the year 1871 there was no end of controversy and squabble over the bonds ($400,000 in amount) issued a year before by the county in aid of the Kansas City and Memphis Railroad. The order was rescinded, re-rescinded, certain bonds burned, then reissued, etc., commissioners appointed, and a great deal of legislation and action performed by the county court. The said bonds are still in existence, as is the controversy, and when the one will become extinct and the other will terminate cannot just now be foretold.

1872 - MISCELLANEOUS.

In January Jackson township was divided into two voting precincts. In May Center township was similarly divided, and in June Walnut Grove township was formed out of the northern portion of Boone, and at the same session of the county court a portion of Center was attached to Boone.

The assessor's books this year showed 3,963 names, and 9,146 tracts of land and town lots. The total taxable property was $7,022,309. The consolidated tax delinquent book showed 8,125 tracts and town lots delinquent. In November the number of registered voters in the county was 4,369.

In November and December nearly every horse in the county was afflicted with epizootic, and oxen were largely used, even in Springfield, for draft animals.

Deaths in 1872.—January 6th, Harvey Massey, aged 43.— July 17th, Capt. R. B. Owen.— July 18th, J. C. Culbertson.— September 20th, John W. Danforth.— November 19th, A. O. Fairchild, aged 64.

ELECTIONS IN 1872—SPECIAL ELECTION IN MAY ON TOWNSHIP ORGANIZATION.

In April a petition signed by S. H. Boyd and 100 others was presented to the b court to submit to a vote of the people, for their adoption or rejection, the question of whether or not Greene county should adopt the township organization plan of county government. The petition was granted, and a special election ordered to decide the question on the 21st of May. This election resulted in an overwhelming defeat of the proposition, the vote standing: For township organization, 327; against, 1,350.

THE NOVEMBER ELECTION, 1872.

This being a presidential year, and everybody being allowed to vote that had ever been entitled to the privilege, Greene county was stirred with excitement from border to border. The nomination of Grant and Wilson was acceptable to the great mass of the Republicans, and they were enthusiastic for him. The liberal Republicans at Cincinnati, in May, nominated Horace Greeley and B. Gratz Brown, the latter Missouri's Governor. The Democrats of the Union indorsed these nominations at Baltimore although many urged the "possum policy," so successfully tried by the Democrats in this State in 1870, and counseled that no nominations be made at all.

The canvass in this county was warm and exciting. Both parties held meetings and pole-raisings, and there was all of the pomp and circumstance, the fuss and fustian, and the fifing and drumming common to political campaigns when the vote is rather close and the party lines sharply drawn. As usual, Greene county was represented among the candidates to be voted for. Two of the candidates for Supreme Judge, John P. Ellis and Thos. A. Sherwood, the one a Republican, the other a Democrat, were frorn this county, as were the nominees for Congress, Hon. H. E. Havens, the Republican, and Ron. C. B. McAfee, the Democratic candidate.

Not all of the Democrats could be induced to vote for Horace Greeley. His bitter denunciation of them and their party for years and years could not so soon be forgotten and so easily forgiven as that they could recognize him as a proper Democratic candidate for President. A great many voted for him under protest; a great many hurrahed for him faintly, and a great many tried to, but the "hurrah," like Macbeth's "amen," stuck in the throat, and never came out. Many Democrats would not go to the polls, and some who went would vote for nothing but county officers, while others voted what was called the "straight" Democratic ticket, headed by Charles O'Conor for President, and John Adams, Jr., for Vice President. [539]

The following is an abstract of the vote in this county, by townships, on the more important offices, at the November election, 1872:

NOVEMBER ELECTION, 1872

 

Presidential Electors

Governor

Congress

State Senator

Sheriff

Townships

Grant

Greeley1

O'Connor1

Henderson

Woodson

Havens

McAfee

Patterson

J. L. Rush

A. J. Potter

C. B. Owen

Boone

131

156

1

127

162

124

167

109

180

142

149

Campbell, North Div'n.

524

470

5

520

482

516

484

539

459

454

558

Campbell, South, Div'n.

343

317

8

345

329

338

339

332

336

313

366

Cass

135

79

0

135

88

133

93

131

93

125

99

Center, 1st Dist.

41

91

1

40

95

36

98

39

96

35

102

Clay

89

36

1

86

39

86

41

82

34

81

46

Jackson, 1st Dist.

70

69

0

70

72

70

72

68

71

71

72

Jackson, 2d Dist.

84

63

1

86

64

78

69

82

67

96

61

Pond Creek

113

35

0

111

37

109

37

109

37

110

44

Robberson

196

149

0

199

149

175

159

181

158

178

172

Taylor

136

33

15

134

47

132

47

132

46

136

47

Walnut Grove

79

42

0

77

45

64

52

76

45

77

42

Wilson

77

97

4

76

102

70

111

74

105

54

126

Total

2082

1665

37

2068

1743

1993

1802

2016

1760

1931

1921

The aggregate vote for the other county officers was as follows:

Representative.—S. W. Headlee (Republican), 1996; John Y. Fulbright (Democratic and Liberal), 1,798.
Collector.— James Abbott (Rep.), 1,965 ; L. A. Newton (Dem. and Lib.), 1,779; A. M. Julian, 78.
County Judge.—M. J. Rountree (Rep.), 1,933; J. J. Campbell (Dem. and Lib.), 1,894.
Treasurer.—A. F. Ingram (Rep.), 2,062; Henry Scholton (Dem. and Lib.), 1,753.
Prosecuting Attorney.—J. T. Rice (Rep.), 1,984; J. R. Waddill (Dem. and Lib.), 1,817.
School Superintendent.—O. S. Reed (Rep.), 2,063 ; N. L. Maiden (Dem. and. Lib.), 1,741.
Public Administrator.—S. H. Julian (Rep.), 1,940 , R. Earnest (Dem. and. Lib.), 1,815.
Surveyor.—J. L. McCraw (Rep.), 1,990; H. M. Parish (Dem. and Lib.), 1,845.

In the State Grant's vote was 119,196; Greeley's, 151,434; O'Conor's, 2,429.

For Governor, Silas Woodson (Dem.), received 156,714 to 122,272 for John B. Henderson (Rep.).

Havens' majority over McAfee for Congress in this district, then the 6th, was 362. [540]

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1 Democrats in italics.
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1873—MISCELLANEOUS.

Decoration Day—Dedication of the Bailey Monument.—On the 30th of May, of this year, extraordinary preparations were made and carried out in the proper observance of Decoration Day. The fine monument provided for in the will of Dr. T. J. Bailey, to be built in honor of the Union soldiers killed at the battle of Springfield, January 8, 1863, was to be dedicated and was already in place. There was a long procession from Springfield to the National Cemetery, a tableau car, carriages, containing flowers in great profusion, visitors from abroad in considerable numbers, etc. Arriving at the cemetery addresses were delivered by Judge W. F. Geiger and others, when the veil covering the monument was removed by Miss Belle Robertson. An able dedicatory address was delivered by ex-Gov. Thos. C. Fletcher.

Confederate Decoration Day.—June 12th the graves in the Confederate Cemetery were dedicated with appropriated services. A large concourse of people was present. Col. Colsus Price, of St. Louis, a son of Gen. Sterling Price, was orator of the day.

Sentenced for Life.—At the June term of the circuit court Ed. Tilley was sentenced to life imprisonment in the penitentiary and Ned Bryant given fifteen years in the same institution for stabbing and killing Joseph McGee (colored) at a dance in North Springfield, some time previously.

Robbery.—In the month of June a case of robbery occurred three miles west of Springfield, remarkable for its singular character and its remarkable mode and method. Mr. Wm. R. Robbertson was at work in his field when he was approached by his brother-in-law, one Mitchell, who had been absent from the county for some time, and who now rode up and, presenting a revolver, demanded Mr. R.'s money. Robbertson gave up what money he had, amounting to about $50. Mitchell ordered him to go to the house and get more and when Mr. Rbbbertson said he had no more, Mitchell called him a liar and shot and wounded him pretty severely. Mitchell escaped.

Murder of Davis.—December 7th, of this year, G. W. Davis, of Christian county, was murdered by Sam Orr and Allen Cox. Orr was afterward hung at Mt. Vernon. Cox went to the penitentiary; Jim Orr and R. K. Hart were tried as accessories and acquitted. [542]

LYNCHING AT WALNUT GROVE—GREENBERRY BUIS HUNG BY THE VIGILANTES.

JulY 7, 1873, one Greenberry Buis was hung by the vigilantes near Walnut Grove. It seemed that Buis had married a daughter of Mr. Jas. Brinn, a respectable citizen of this county, with whom he lived for some time. In 1872 they moved to Cass county, where Buis was arrested for stealing horses, and sent to the penitentiary. In the meantime, his wife's father had taken her to his home again, which she had left against his desire to marry the unfortunate man. The Governor pardoned Buis, who returned to the vicinity of Walnut Grove, where he had some relatives. Of course his wife returned to him. Although he had been out of the penitentiary about a month, he and a brother-in-law, Wood by name, were accused of stealing sheep and selling them to the butchers of Springfield and in Polk county. They were arrested and Buis escaped, while Wood was sent to Hermitage jail, in Hickory county.

Buis was arrested in Barry, and was being conveyed to Polk county for trial. He requested the guards to allow him to remain one night with his wife, and they accordingly stopped with her on the fatal night. About 9 o'clock a body of about twenty-five armed men rode up, took the prisoner out and hung him to a tree. The guards know not the men, and were powerless to prevent the terrible deed. The man hung, within a quarter of a mile of his home, until the next evening at 4 o'clock, when the inquest was held and the body cut, down.

THE PATRONS OF HUSBANDRY.

In the year 1873 the first lodges of this order were established in this county. June 23d, Mr. T. R. Allen, of St. Louis county, came to Springfield and organized the first Grange in Southwest Missouri, called Springfield Grange. The following were the first members:

Dr. A. W. McPherson, master; J. W. D. L. F. Mack, lecturer; J. B. Lawson, gate-keeper; J. J. Weaver, treasurer; C. Cannefax, chaplain; Henry Scholten, steward; R. P. Matthews, assistant steward; Miss Bettie Weaver, secretary; Mrs. M. C. L. Cannefax, lady assistant secretary; Mrs. J. A. Lawson, Flora; Miss Lizzie McPherson, Ceres; Miss Ella J. Cannefax, Pomona; S. H. Owens, Joel Philips, J. A. McConnell, B. W. McCormick, W. H. Kershner, L. B. Austin, H. R. Langston, R. B. Porter, Henry Westmorland, Mrs. M. G. Weaver, Mrs. M. J. McCormick, Mrs. L. E. Kershner, Mrs. J. H. Show. [543]

The same evening of the organization of Springfield Grange, Mr. Allen went a few miles west of town and there organized another. After a time, A. W. McPherson was appointed district deputy, and himself organized and set to work several granges in this county until at one time the total number was about twenty.

September 5th, 1878, the Patrons, or Grangers, hold their first picnic at the Newbill farm, two miles west of Springfield. The picnic was given under the auspices of Grand Prairie Grange. Addresses were delivered, and there was an enjoyable time for all that attended. Other picnics were held at different times, while the order flourished in this county. A notable, one was at Weaver's Grove, west of Springfield, June 2d, 1875. Speeches were here made by I. S. Haseltine, J. W. Mack, J. H. Show and J. H. Creighton.

After a time a county council was organized at Springfield, and from time to time delegates were sent to the State Grange. In 1873, A. W. McPherson was the delegate; in 1875, Hon. J. H. Show. At one time, in 1876 or '77, A. W. McPherson was county agent for the grangers of this county and bought a great quantity of seeds, etc., for them, but was forced to give up his position on account of the hard work involved and poor pay received.

November 18, 1875, the district grange held a special meeting in the Odd Fellows' Hall, at Springfield, for the purpose of ascertaining the amount of stock that had been subscribed to a "cooperative store," in response to circulars. Only five granges had responded. Rocky Point grange had taken one share ($100), Kickapoo grange, two shares; Pleasant Springs, two; Wesley Chapel, one share Hunt's, one. Springfield and O'Sullivan granges refused to subscribe. Other granges had not received the circulars in time for action.

Afterwards a "grange store" was conducted on South street, in Springfield, by a firm already in business, but its life was short and its business insufficient. The grangers would buy where they pleased if they could buy cheap, and get credit.

DISTRICT GRANGES.

In December following the organization of the first granges in Greene county a district grange or council was organized at Springfield. The following copy of its proceedings has been kindly furnished by Mrs. N. M. McKibben, the former secretary and well known efficient lady worker in the order:

Springfield, Mo., December 4, 1873
The Patrons of Husbandry met for the purpose of completing an organization under the name of the District Council, composed of Greene and adjoining counties, adopted a constitution, appointed committees, and elected officers.

The following subordinate granges were represented through their delegates:

Grange

No.

Delegate

County

Springfield

380

R. P. Mathews

Greene

Walnut Spring

711

A. J. Vaughn

Greene

Yeakley

712

J. C. Mason

Greene

Wesley Chapel

718

M. D. McCroskey

Christian

Valley Prairie

1112

B. D. Smith

Polk

Grove Grange

572

Wm. G. Wells

Polk

Ash Grove

864

A. M. Appleby

Greene

Kenton

708

H. W. Myers

Christian

Ozark

499

H. H. Mullings

Christian

Morrisville

575

H. McBond

Polk

Mathews

1091

N. B. Turner

Greene

Central

1114

H. S. Carrier

Polk

Tullah Rural

--

John Kemp

--

Cave Spring

914

F. M. Watson

Greene

Woods

1113

T. H. Rathbone

Greene

Taylor Township

714

W. J. Bosson

Greene

Walnut Grove

869

E. Wilson

Greene

Three Mound

--

O. D. Gunn

Greene

Grand Prairie

927

J. Y. Fulbright

Grenee

Kickapoo

827

W. B. Anderson

Greene

Ozark

707

T. T. Gideon

Christian

Pearson Creek

913

A. E. Duff

Greene

Pleasant Divide

909

H. A. Neaves and wife

Greene

Pickerel

900

C. W. Garoutte

Greene

Brookline

826

T. M. Gibson

Greene

COMMITTEES.

Executive Committee.— Jno. Y. Fulbright, W. B. Anderson, T. A. Reed, D. M. Cowan, Jno. Carson.
Finance Committee.—J. W. D. L. F. Mack, L. T. Watson, J. H. Show.
Printing.—Chesley Cannefax, Henry Scholten, Jno. Evans.
Officers of Council. —Master M. J. Rountree; overseer, H. G. Mullings; steward, T. H. Rathbone; assistant steward, J. B. Lawson; secretary, R. P. Mathews; treasurer, A. M. Appleby; gate keepers T. M. Watson.

January 7, 1875, the District Council adopted a revised constitution, which did not change its object, but because its center of operation was at Springfield it changed its name to Springfield District Grange. The District Council, at the time of its organization, was composed of over sixty subordinate granges, from the counties of Greene, Christian, Polk, Taney, and Cass [?]. But as the object of the Patrons of Husbandry became more generally disseminated, each of these counties, except Christian, had its own county organization of the Patrons of Husbandry, and such granges of Springfield District Grange as were located in these counties, withdrew, and attached themselves to their own county organization, so that the granges composing Springfield District Grange were confined principally to Greene county.

January 5, 1883, Springfield District Grange adopted a revised constitution which did not change the object of the district council co-operation, but considering it more appropriate, it changed its name to Greene County District Grange.

EFFECT OF THE PANIC OF 1873.

The panic of 1873 had a more damaging effect upon Greene county than on many other communities in Missouri. "Hard times" set in in the fall and continued until late in the following year. Money was scarce, the rates of interest exorbitant and usurious, while property of all sorts and kinds depreciated very seriously. Lands in the county were indeed "dirt cheap" and lots and houses in Springfield sold for one-half of their former value. North Springfield was badly injured. Many persons disposed of their property at a sacrifice and left the county.

CREATION OF BROOKLINE TOWNSHIP.

In this year Brookline township was formed. The order of the county court defining its boundaries, made January 23, was as follows:—"Brookline Township—Commencing at the northeast corner of section 1, tp. 28, range 23; thence south to the southeast corner of section 25; thence west to the southeast corner of section 30; thence north to the northwest corner of section 6; thence east to the north-east corner of section 1, the place of beginning—all in township 28, range 23." [545]

1874—ELECTIONS—THE TADPOLE CAMPAIGN.

During the political canvass of 1874 the opposition to the Democratic party in Missouri took on the name of People's party," or "Reform party," but was termed by the Democrats "the Tadpole party," because some of its members, the Democracy said, were old Democrats gradually changing to Republicans, as a tadpole changes to a frog. The "People's party" at its State convention, composed chiefly of Republicans, and held in Jefferson City, Sept. 3d, nominated a full State ticket, headed by Hon. William Gentry, of Pettis county, for Governor, and Hon. S. W. Headlee, of this county, for Lieutenant governor.

The Democratic convention, held August 26, nominated Chas. H. Hardin, of Audrain, for Governor,2 and Col. Norman J. Colman, of St. Louis, for Lieutenant Governor. The November election in this county resulted as follows:

For Governor.— Gentry, 1860; Hardin,3 604.
For Congressman.— C. W. Thrasher (of Greene), 1,705; Chas. H. Morgan, 1,722.
For Representative.— (Only one chosen) L. A. Rountree, 1,297; L. H. Murray, 1,778; H. Fletcher, 394.
For Circuit Judge.— W. F. Geiger, 1,564; J. C. Cravens, 1,513; J. W. D. L. F. Mack, 304.
For Sheriff.— A. J. Potter, 1,671 ; C. B. Owen, 1,825.
For County Clerk. — G. A. C. Wooley, 1,025; A. Demuth, 810; J. D. Van Bibber, 1,593.
For Constitutional Convention. —Yes, 842; No, 1,983.

In January the Legislature had submitted to the people of Missouri the question of whether or not a constitutional convention should be called, the question to be decided at the November election. In the State the proposition was carried by only 283 majority, the vote standing: for a convention, 111,299; against, 111,016. [546]

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2 By one-sixth of a vote over the number of votes necessary to a choice (159), and by three votes over his competitor, Gen. F. M. Cockrill, now U. S. Senator,— the vote standing, Hardin, 159 1-6; Cockrill, 156 5-6.
3 Democrats in italics.


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