History of Greene County, Missouri
1883

R. I. Holcombe, Editing Historian


Chapter 21
Center Township

Part 2
Biographies of Old Settlers and Prominent Citizens
of Center Township.


BIOGRAPHIES.

JAMES M. BAKER. Baker is the son of Hamilton and Nancy (Haynie) Baker who were natives of Tennessee. James was born in McMinn county, Tenn., Nov. 2d, 1851. In 1854 his parents moved to Greene county, Mo., where he grew to manhood, and received but a limited education. He has since lived in the county and owns a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres of land, besides property in Bois D'Arc. In 1881 he, in partnership with Mr. E. E. Hendrix engaged in merchandising at Bois D'Are, to which place he moved his family in 1882. He was married January 8th, 1870, to Miss Catherine, daughter of Jame E. and Sallie (Leeper) Harralson of this county. By this union they have three children, viz.: William, Ardello and Walter E. Mr. Baker is one of the safe, reliable men of the county and enjoys the confidence of all.

WILLIAM M. BENNETT. This gentleman is the son of Parminter M. and Sarah (Kelay) Bennett, and was born in Cocke county, Tennessee, October 13th, 1840. His parents were natives of South Carolina, but emigrated to Tennessee in an early day, and came to Greene county, Missouri, in 1844. His mother died in 1876 and his father died in 1880. William grew to manhood in this county, and on the 26th of July, 1862, enlisted in company A, 8th Missouri Cavalry, U. S. A., and served until the war closed. He was at the battles of Prairie Grove, Little Rock, Ashley Station, and numerous scouting and skirmishing expeditions. After the War he returned home and has since been engaged in farming, He owns a farm of ninety-five acres in Center township. He was married October 29th 1865, to Miss Martha A., daughter of James W., and Susan C. (Bird) McSpadden of this county. Mrs. Bennett's father was a native of Tennessee, and her mother of Georgia. Her father was a soldier in the Mexican war, and in the civil war, was upon the Confederate side, and died from the effect of a wound received at Iuka, Mississippi. Mr. and Mrs. Bennett have had a family of seven children, six living, viz.: Susan L., Henry W., Sarah C., Aurelia C., Mary O. and William I. Mr. Bennett and wife have been members of the Methodist church for sixteen years, and he has been class-leader for four years.

NATHANIEL BETSON. This gentleman is the son of Robert and Mary (Mount) Betson, and was born in Clinton county, Ohio, December 20, 1821, His father was a native of New Jersey and his mother of Pennsylvania, in which State they were married. Nathaniel was the second of a family of eleven children, and when he was about three years of age his parents moved back to Greene county, Pa., where they remained until 1833, when they returned to Clinton county, Ohio. In the fall of 1840 the Betsons moved to Missouri, and located in Greene county, in the northern part of Pond Creek township. Nathaniel lived with his father until he was twenty-five years of age and then he was married to Miss Nancy C., daughter of James and Jane (Stockton) Hughes. She was born in Rhea county, Tennessee, November 14, 1829. When she was four years of age her parents moved to Alabama, and in 1844 they moved to Greene county, Missouri. Her father was a soldier in the Mexican War and also in the union army in the civil war. He died from wounds received at the battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas. He served his country in two great wars, and at last met a soldier's death. Mr. Betson has always followed farming, and is one of the most successful and substantial farmers in Greene county. He owns a finely improved farm of five hundred and forty acres. He had four sons in the Union army, one of whom died in the service. Mr. and Mrs. Betson were blest with nine children, eight of whom are living, viz: Malina, Isaac, Abner B., James M., George W., Nathaniel L. H., Sarah L. G. and C. David. [648]

WILLIAM WALLACE BLACKMAN. Mr. Blackman is the son of Stephen and Matilda J. (Campbell) Blackman, and was born in Maury county, Tennessee, December 28th, 1881, and came with his parents to Greene county, Missouri, in 1836. His parents were natives of Tennessee, and his grandfather upon his mother's side was a soldier in the war of 1812, and died in the army at New Orleans. His father entered the land now used as a race track near Springfield. He died March 18th, 1870 and his wife died December 18th, 1870. William grow to manhood in this county, and in 1852 he went to California with a drove of cattle. He remained there two years, working and trading. He returned home in 1854 via Lake Nicaragua, landing at New Orleans, having saved twenty-five hundred dollars. In 1857 he took a drove of cattle across to California upon his own account, and returned the same year, coming via Isthmus of Panama and landing at New York with seven thousand dollars. He then began farming and stock dealing in this county, and at the beginning of the civil war was worth twenty-five thousand dollars. June 17th, 1861 he enlisted in Captain Campbell's company of cavalry, Confederate service, and served until the war closed. At Wilson's Creek he was a guide for General Rains on that memorable battlefield. After the battle at Pea Ridge he was transferred east of the Mississippi to Corinth, and in 1862 Major Campbell was sent with seventy-five men into this section to recruit a regiment. They succeeded and Mr. Blackman was with that regiment at the battles of Little Rock, Pine Bluff, Poison Spring, Jenkin's Ferry and Pilot Knob. He was desperately wounded in September, 1864, being shot in the head at the ear, and the bullet is still in his head in the back part near the base of the brain. He also carries a ball in his leg which broke the bone, and has never been extracted. It was eleven days before he could get his wounds dressed, as the surgeons thought it would hasten his death. But they finally dressed them and he began to mend at once. When the Confederates left, he was taken prisoner by the Federals and sent to the Alton penitentiary, and afterward was exchanged at Richmond, Virginia, and sent to Mobile, and then to Jackson, Mississippi. When the war closed he went to Texas, where he remained until 1869 and then returned to Greene county. He found his affairs in a bad plight and himself about twenty-five hundred dollars in debt. He set about to retrieve his fallen fortunes in which he has succeeded well. He has a large farm well stocked and an elegant residence. He was married October 29th, 1866, to Miss Julia, daughter of Madison and Margaret S. (Davidson) Fanning of Titus county, Texas. They are blest with three children. Mr. Blackman is a member of the Christian church.

PETER BLACKWELL. Mr. Blackwell is the son of Sylvester and Martha (Gregg) Blackwell, and was born in Polk county, Tennessee, January 20th, 1839. In 1846 his parents moved to McMinn county. His father was a justice of the peace and colonel of the militia. Peter came to Greene county, Missouri, in 1855, and in 1857 he went to Kansas where he lived until 1866. He served during a portion of the war with the Kansas State troops, and since 1865 he resided in this county engaged in farming. He has been a member of the A. F. and A. M. since 1865, and for twelve years has been a member of the M. E. Church South. Mr. Blackwell owns a good farm of one hundred and forty-two acres. He was married in 1860 to Miss Frances J., daughter of Edmund and Mary (Frazier) Hart, of Allen county, Kansas, formerly of Illinois. By this union there are four children living, viz.: Julia A., Laura E., Edmund S. and Mary L. Mrs. Blackwell died November 27,1879. Mr. Blackwell was married the second time, October 28th, 1880, to Mrs. Mary Grubbs, daughter of Galon and Rebecca (Tatum) Johnson, of Greene county, Missouri. Their union has been blest with one son, Walter M. Mrs. Blackwell had two children by her former husband, Lewis A. and Annie May. Mr. Grubbs died in 1877. [649]

SYLVESTER BLACKWELL. This gentleman is the son of Peter and Lydia (Padget) Blackwell, and was born in Rutherford county, North Carolina, November 14, 1810. Both his grandfathers were Revolutionary soldiers. One of them, Blackwell, was at the battle of Cowpens. Sylvester Blackwell was born within four miles of the battle ground. In 1823 his parents moved to McMinn county, Tennessee, where be grew to manhood. He was a farmer and blacksmith, and was quite a prominent citizen there, having held the office of justice of the peace four years, and being colonel of a regiment of State militia. In 1855 he moved to Greene county, Missouri, and in 1868 moved to the farm where he now resides. He has been twice married, the first time to Miss Martha, daughter of Joel and Eunice Grigg, of McMinn county, Tennessee. They had by that union fourteen children. Mrs. Blackwell died August 27, 1876, and he was married the second time to Mrs. Boyd, widow of the late Col. Marcus Boyd. She was a Miss Price, daughter of Crabtree and L. Price, natives of Virginia, who came to Greene county in 1886. Mr. Blackwell had one son in the Federal and one in the Confederate army. He has been a member of the M. E. Church South, since he was nineteen years of age, and is regarded as one of the most upright citizens of the county.

JOHN A. BLANCHARD. This gentleman is the son of Henry H. and Mary W. (Patton) Blanchard, and was born in Logan county, Kentucky, December 7, 1886. In 18I9 his parents moved to Greene county, Missouri, and settled upon Leeper Prairie, where John grew to manhood. When he was twenty years of age he began teaching school and followed that in connection with farming until 1874. In 1861 he enlisted in Capt. Campbell's company of Missouri-State Guards as orderly sergeant, and was at the battles of Dug Spring and Wilson's Creek. At the expiration of his term of enlistment he was taken with typhoid fever, which disabled him for further service at the time. In February, 1862, he and his father started South in the rear of Price's army. They were overtaken upon the 12th of that month by Federal troops, who took his father out of the wagon and killed him. He was sick in the wagon at the time. He returned home with his father's body, and in 1868 moved to Boone county, Missouri, where he remained until 1865. He then returned to this county, where he has remained ever since. He has been justice of the peace, and was county recorder, from 1874 to 1878. Mr. Blanchard is a Mason, and a deacon and clerk of the Baptist church, of which he has been a member for twenty-seven years. In 1865 he only had a wagon and team, and he now owns a finely improved farm of one hundred and eighty acres. He was married September 17, 1863, to Miss Cordelia D., daughter of Lewis F. and Sarah (Robinson) Tatum, of this county.

FRANK C. BOBBITT is a son of John and Amanda Bobbitt, and was born in Grayson county, Virginia, August 25, 1856. His father was a blacksmith by trade, and Frank worked with him, learning that trade in his father's shop, and has followed that vocation all his life. From 1876 to 1879, he worked at his calling in Ohio and Kentucky, and in the latter year came to Greene county, Missouri, working at his trade in Ash Grove and for the railroad company. He located in Bois D'Are in 1882, where he does a flourishing business in his line. Mr. Bobbitt was married in 1879 (March 2d) to Miss Lizzie Alexander, of Lincoln county, Kentucky. They have two children, one boy and one girl, named Rosa B., and John. Mr. B. is a man wall thought of by the people of the community, and is a reliable and trustworthy citizen. [650]

JOHN J. BROWN, M. D. Dr. Brown is a son of John and Ellen (nee Henderson) Brown, both of his parents being natives of Virginia. He was born in Rockcastle county, Kentucky, February 6, 1817, and grew up in his native county, receiving his education in St. Mary's College and the University of Kentucky. Early in life be began the study of medicine. In 1866 and 1867 he attended the medical college at Cincinnati, Ohio, and on leaving there began the practice at Mt. Vernon, near where he was born. In 1876, he entered the medical department of the State University, returning to Mt. Vernon and resuming his old practice after he took his degree of M. D. in 1876. He was appointed the same year by Gov. McCrary to serve as official examiner for the fifteenth district, to pass upon applicants who desired to practice medicine before graduating from a chartered college of medicine. For eight years Dr. Brown filled the office of county school commissioner in his native county. He was married December 16, 1867, to Miss Mollie E. Snodgrass, a native of the same county as himself. They have seven children, all living at this writing. In the fall of 1882, Dr. Brown came to Green county, locating at Bois D'Are. So well-informed and experienced a physician will, doubtless, win for himself that full share of the professional practice which his ability and general fitness so fully merit.

ROLLA CARTER. Mr. Carter is the son of Caleb: and Nancy (Ferguson) Carter, and was born in Monroe county, Tennessee, in 1830. His father was a native of Virginia, and his mother of Tennessee. His grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812. In 1883 his parents moved to Greene county, Missouri, and were among the early pioneers of this country. His father was a blacksmith by trade and had his shop where Rolla now lives. There being no shop near him, he did the work for a space of country extending twenty-five or thirty miles from home. During the war Rolla served in Captain Redferan's company of militia about a year. Mr. Carter was married in 1850 to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Stephen and Sarah Darrell, of this county. Her parents were from Indiana, and were among the first settlers of the county. Mr. and Mrs. Carter were blessed with thirteen children, nine of whom are still living. Mr. Carter is one of the most substantial citizens of Center township, owning over five hundred acres of land.

THOMAS J. DUNCAN. Mr. Duncan is the son of James and Elizabeth (Yeakle) Duncan, and was born in Greene county, Tennessee, March 23, 1848. His parents were natives of that county, and his grandfathers upon both sides were soldiers in the war of 1812. In 1868, before he was fifteen years of age, he enlisted in company E, 4th Tennessee regiment infantry, and at the battle of McMinnville, Tenn., was taken prisoner by General Wheeler. He was paroled and in the spring of 1864 was exchanged and served through the war. He was at the battles of Knoxville and Warm Springs. He learned the blacksmith trade after the war and worked at it in Tennessee until 1876, when he came to Greene county, Missouri, and located at Bois D'Arc, where he has since carried on his trade, and is doing a flourishing business. He owns a nice property in town, and is one of the charter members of Bois D'Arc Lodge, I. O. O. F. Mr. Duncan was married February 9, 1871, to Miss Mattie J., daughter of William and Mary (Lowdermilk) Chapman, of Greene county, Tennessee. Their union has been blest with four children, viz.: Annie B., John H., Bessie A., and Freddie W. Mr Duncan is a good, substantial citizen and respected by all. [651]

 WILLIAM J. FRAZIER. This gentleman is the son of Hon. Franklin T. and Maria J. (Crawford) Frazier, and was born in Henry county, Tennessee, September 22, 1838. His parents moved to Greene county, Missouri, in 1847, where William grew to manhood upon the farm. In 1861 he enlisted in Captain Campbell's company of Missouri State Guards, and was at the battle of Dug Spring and Wilson's Creek, and was slightly wounded at the former engagement. He served out his term of enlistment, and, as his health failed, he did not enter the regular Confederate service, but went with his father to Texas, and stayed until 1865, when they came back to this State, and in 1866 they returned to Greene county. Since the war Mr.Frazier has been engaged in farming, and is a prosperous, substantial citizen. He has been both justice of the peace and constable. He is a Mason, and has been a member of the Baptist church six years. He was married July 27, 1863, to Miss Martha, daughter of Greenberry and Prudence (Tatuni) Robinson, of this county. Their union has been blest with two children, George T., and William F.

JAMES K. GRAY. Mr. Gray is the son of John and Sallie (Whinrey) Gray, and was born in Greene county, Tennessee, December 12, 1827. His parents were natives of that State, and his maternal grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812. James K. grew to manhood upon the farm in his native State, and has always followed farming. He moved to Greene county, Missouri, in 1850, and in 1858 he came to the place where he now resides. During the war he served for some time in Captain Redferan's company of militia. He owns a well improved farm of one hundred and sixty acres. Mr. Gray was married March 17, 1853, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of James and Jane Johnson, of this county. By this union they had three children, one of whom, Sarah J., is still living. Mrs. Gray died November 16, 1858, and upon the 11th of August, 1859, he was married the second time to Miss Nancy J., daughter of Edward and Elizabeth West, also of this county. Her parents were among the pioneers of this county, and were natives of Tennessee. Her grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812. Their marriage has been blessed with seven children, John E., Julia A., deceased, Elizabeth, James H., Noel, George W., and Louisa C. Mr. Gray has been a member of the Baptist church twenty-five years.

JAMES HARRALSON. The subject of this sketch is the son of William and. Catharine (Wills) Harralson, his father being one of the pioneers of Greene county, coming as early as 1837, when there were but five other families in what is now Center township. The father, William, was a native of North Carolina, born June 22, 1784. He moved to Tennessee in an early day, and soon afterwards served through the war of 1812. He died December 16, 1882, aged ninety-eight years. James Harralson's grandfather served through the revolution of 1776 and James has a relic—a candle-stick—that his ancestor captured when Charleston was taken. James, with whom this sketch has particularly to deal, was born in Monroe county, Tenn., December 16, 1828. He came with his parents to Greene county in 1837, and they settled on the land where he resides at this writing. He attended the first school taught in that part of the county, remaining in Greene till 1856, when he moved to Laclede county, Mo., and there resided till 1863. He then returned to Greene county, and has ever since resided here, chiefly engaged in farming. He lost his personal property by the war, but retained his land. At this writing he owns 600 acres of land, and has given 400 acres to his children. Mr. Harralson was married August 9, 1849, to Miss Sarah Leeper, of the pioneer family of that name, in Greene county. She died June 9, 1876, and he was again married March 31, 1878, to Mrs. E. S. Hughes, a daughter of William and Susan McClure, who came to Greene in 1837, from Tennessee. By his first marriage Mr. H. had six children, five of whom are living. Mr. H. ranks as one of the best citizens and most substantial farmers of the county. [652]

ELI E. HENDRIX. His parents were Nicholas and Sarah Ann (White) Hendrix, both natives of Tennessee. He was born in Greene county, Tennessee, March 9, 1858. He came with his father's family to Kentucky in 1856, but they all moved back in 1860, remaining till 1872, when Eli came to Greene county, Mo., where he has since resided. Farming was his principal calling till early in 1881, when he began merchandising in Bois D'Are. Mr. Hendrix married December 24, 1876, his wife being Miss Nancy, daughter of Merideth and Eliza Jane Redfearn, old settlers of Greene county. Mr. and Mrs. H. have had three children,—Sarah Ann, William, and Maude J. Mr. Hendrix, besides his residence in Bois D'Arc, owns a farm of 103 acres, and other property, most of which he has accumulated by his own energy and industry.

JESSE L. HOYAL. Mr. Hoyal's parents were David and Margaret J. Hoyal, both natives of Tennessee. Jesse was born in Roane county, Tenn., June 24, 1846. In 1858 his parents moved to Lawrence county, Mo., where they continued till 1863 when they removed to Randolph county. There they remained but a short time, removing next to Cooper county, Mo., where they remained till the civil war closed. The family then moved back to Lawrence county, where the elder (David R. Royal) was soon afterwards killed, shot by some unknown assassin as Mr. H. was on his way to the barn. Jesse then spent a year on the plains, and, in 1868, located in Greene county, and engaged in farming and mule trading, buying mules and driving to the Southern markets. He also bought and shipped wheat, and that latter still continues to be his business in part,—has shipping over 150 carloads per year. He owns a fine farm of 200 acres, and also owns property in Springfield, all of which he has accumulated by his own effort. Mr. Hoyal was married June 4, 1868, to Laura daughter of A. and Susannah Leeper, of Greene county. They have had five children, three of whom still survive. Mr. H. is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and also belongs to the Methodist church. He is a citizen in whose trustworthiness all who know him have confidence.

MELVIN S. HOYAL. Mr. Hoyal is the son of David R. and Margaret E. Royal, and was born in Roane county, Tennessee, October 29, 1844. In 1860 his parents moved to Lawrence county, Missouri, and in 1868 Melvin enlisted in the Confederate army and served until the end of the war. He spent the years 1865 and 1866 in Colorado, Montana, and Dakoto. He then came to this county and engaged in farming until 1879, when he went to Bois D'Arc and embarked in the mercantile business, under the firm name of Bymaster & Hoyal. In the spring of 1882 he became one of the firm of Hoyal, Redfearn & Johnson, the leading house of the place. Mr. Hoyal was married in 1866 to Miss Harriet E., daughter of Josiah F. and Lucy R. Redfearn, of Greene county. Their union has been blest with five children, four of whom are still living; Addie C., Leonidas S., Olive and Lucy. Mrs. Hoyals' parents were natives of Tennessee, and among the pioneers of Greene county.

WILLIAM D. JOHNSON. Mr. Johnson is a son of Barton and Susannah (nee Horne) Johnson, both natives of Tennessee. The family moved to Greene county, this State, in 1839, where William D. was born, April 19th, 1850. He was reared on the farm and educated in the common schools, and for some time followed the vocation of farming himself. In 1882, however, he engaged in the mercantile business at Bois D'Are, as a member of the firm of Hoyal, Redferan & Johnson, one of the liveliest business houses in the county. Mr. Johnson was married September 12th, 1870, to Miss Eliza, daughter of Jefferson and Hannah Grantham, of Greene county. They have had six children, five of whom survive at this writing, named: Estella V., James C., William F., Maggie M., and Pearla. Mr. Johnson is a live young business man, and has the entire confidence of his neighbors and patrons. [653]

BENJAMIN R. JOHNSON was born in Greene county, Tennessee, September 1, 1824. His parents were Benjamin and Mary Johnson, the former a native of South Carolina, and the latter of Virginia. Benjamin, jr.'s, father was a great hunter, and achieved quite a reputation for sports of the chase in Tennessee. He came with his family to Greene county Missouri, in 1841, and settled where the subject of this sketch still resides, in Center township, where he lived till his decease in 1867. His wife, the mother of Benjamin M, also died in this county the following year. Benjamin was then seventeen years old when he came with his parents to this county, which has been his home ever since, with the exception of a short time spent in Dade county. In 1862, he enlisted on the Union side for the civil war in Capt. Redfearn's company, 44th State Militia, and was in active service for two years, doing duty all over Southwest Missouri, and participating in a number of fights and skirmishes. He held the rank of sergeant. Mr. Johnson was married October 6, 1846, to Miss Celia D., daughter of L. and Millie Morris, natives of Tennessee. Mrs. J.'s mother had died when she was an infant and a Mr. Douglas adopted and reared her. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are the parents of twelve children, of whom there are living at this writing: James W., Susan J., Martha C., Catherine H., Benjamin, Alexander S., Joseph E., and Emma P. Mr. Johnson owns a fine farm of 250 acres, besides the liberal gifts made to his married children. He has been a consistent member, for over forty years, of the Methodist church in which he has filled many official positions. He is regarded as one of the most substantial farmers of that part of Greene county.

ROBERT T. JOHNS. This gentleman is the son of William and Martha (Robinson) Johns, natives of Tennessee, who came to Greene county, Missouri, in 1844. Robert was born in Robertson county, Tennessee, March 4, 1838. He grew to manhood here in this county, receiving such education as the schools of the county afforded. At the age of seventeen, he commenced to work at milling. His father built a mill in 1855, near where the Johns Bros.'s mill now stands. He has since followed milling and farming, building his mill in 1872. Mr. Johns was married December 23, 1860, to Miss Sarah E. Wallace, daughter of Prior and Martha D. (Neil) Wallace, of this county. Her parents were natives of Tennessee. Their union has been blest, with five children, all living, viz.: Montzell, Mary O., Belle E., Ida L., and Stella J. Mr. Johns has been a liberal patron of the religious denomination to which he belongs, the M. E. Church South, giving about one-fourth the cost of the church building named in his honor in his neighborhood. He has been an active member of the Methodist church for eighteen years, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He owns over three hundred acres of land, besides his milling property. No man in the county enjoys the confidence of his neighbors to a greater extent than Robert T. Johns.

MOSES A. KIRKHAM. Mr. Kirkham is the son of Moses A. and Elizabeth (Warren) Kirkham, and was born in Davis county, Iowa, June 27, 1861. His father was a native of Ohio, and his mother of Kentucky. His grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812, and his father was an Indian agent. His father moved to Kansas in 1857, and was the nearest neighbor of John Brown, and also took an active part with Brown in the Kansas troubles. When Moses was about fifteen years of age, he started out for himself and learned the plasterer's and bricklayer's trade. Since then he has worked at his trade in Kansas, Iowa, Texas, and Missouri. During the year 1876 be mined for lead at Galena, Kansas. In 1881, he moved to Springfield, and in 1882, he went to Bois D'Arc, where he now resides and works at his trade, and is proprietor of the Bois D'Arc hotel. He was married November 20, 1870, to Miss Lucinda, daughter of Squire and Lucinda (Hawkins) Owens, of Franklin county, Kansas. Their union has been blest, with four children, three of whom are now living, viz., Geneva, Tyrena, and Pearl. [654]

JENNINGS W. LAMBETH. Mr. Lambeth is a son of Josiah and Rebecca Lambeth, and was born in Guilford county, North Carolina, May 8th 1842. He was left an orphan when but three years old, and was reared by his grandmother, and received his education at the Monticello Academy, of his native State. At the age of twenty, in the spring of 1862, he enlisted for the Confederate service in the Second N. C. Cavalry, but was transferred the following fall to Gen. Lee's command, and served under Stewart and Hampden till the close of the war. He participated in the battles of Newberne, Culpepper, Fredricksburg, and all other important movements of that active army. He was once seriously wounded, and disabled for ten months, and was subsequently captured, just before the surrender. Returning home after the war, he went to Henderson, Texas, and engaged in merchandising. In 1868, he went to Montgomery county, and there married Miss Julia Bymaster. Removing thence to Lebanon, Mo., he was engaged as engineer in locating the "Frisco" R.R. to Springfield.

In 1870 he moved to Christian county, Mo., and engaged in farming and stock raising till 1882, when he sold out and came to Bois D'Arc, this county, and began merchandising with John Bymaster. Mr. Lambeth is the father of four children, two of whom—Virgil C. and Fannie O.—are still living at this writing. He is a consistent member of the Christian church.

AARON NUTT. Mr. Nutt is the son of Moses and Catherine (Haley) Nutt, and was born in Burlington county, New Jersey, Feb. 22nd, 1810. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812. His parents moved to Pennsylvania, and in 1822 they moved to Clermont county, Ohio. When Aaron was about fourteen years of age his father was killed by the falling of a tree while chopping in the woods. Aaron was then bound out and learned the blacksmith's trade. In 1881 he worked at his trade at Cincinnati, and for about two years followed steam-boating. In 1836 he went to Fort Smith, Arkansas, and worked at his trade. In 1838 he went to the Choctaw Nation, where he followed his trade until 1852, and was said to be the best blacksmith in the nation. In 1852 he came to Springfield, Mo., and went to work for Maupin & Perkins. He was soon made foreman and held the position two years, and then carried on a shop for himself. In 1857 he moved out upon the farm where he now resides, and is one of Greene's most substantial citizens. He was one of the charter members of the first Odd Fellow's Society in this county. Mr. Nutt was married Jan. 11th 1863, to Miss O. Blackman, daughter of Stephen and Matilda (Campbell) Blackman. Their union has been blest with eight children, five of whom are now living, viz.: Stephen R., Kate, Lizzie, Lucy and Moses. His first wife died in 1871, an in 1876 he was again married, to Miss Nannie Hammonds.

JOHN W. McDANIEL. Mr. McDaniel is the son of William and Sarah A. (Blades) McDaniel, and was born in Greene county, Mo., March 21, 1889. His parents were natives of Tennessee, and his grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812. His father was one of the pioneers of Greene county, and when he settled in Pond Creek township, there was but one other family, that of David Reynolds, in that part of the county. John W. grew to manhood upon the farm and has always followed that occupation, being very successful and owning two well improved farms, and a half interest in a tract of mining land. In 1861 he enlisted in Phelp's regiment and served out his time of six months, and at the organization of Capt. Redferan's company of militia, in 1862, he was appointed first lieutenant, and was afterward promoted captain, serving with that rank until the end of the war, doing efficient service for the government in Southwest Missouri, in scouting, etc. He is a member of the Methodist church, and is one of Center's best citizens. He was married July 3, 1866, to Miss Sarah Virginia C., daughter of Silas and Jane Bay, of this county, formerly of Tennessee. Their union has been blest with eight children, five of whom are living, Hannah A., Amanda E. Jesse O., Dora A. and Mary B. [655]

JAMES T. McKIBBEN. Mr. McKibben was born in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, in Decomber, 1824. His father, Joseph McKibbon, moved with his wife and child in 1824, settling in Richland county, Ohio, where he cleared "a new farm in a newly and sparsely settled district. With willing hands the new comers" (other families besides his own being so styled by first comers)—made fences, built houses, opened shops, and organized schools and churches. In this now and active community, Mr. McKibben grew up, receiving his education in the home circle, on the farm and in the public school. There were eight other children in the family, all girls and all younger than J. T. His help was needed, on the farm, and he cheerfully gave it till he went to attend school at Oberlin, in 1847. From an article written by Mr. E. M. Leonard, it appears that Mr. McKibben spent two years at Oberlin the first time, then taught two years, and then, in 1851, made a fourteen months' tour in the West. Returning to his father's farm, he, assisted him till the spring of 1864, when he returned to Oberlin, took the course and graduated from the commercial college, in the meantime studying law. In the fall he went back to assist his father, but returned to Oberlin the following spring, and continued his study of law. In the fall of 1865, he married Nancy M., daughter of Stephen and Lydia Potter, of Cortland county, N. Y. They remained in New York till 1863, when they came to his father's, in Ohio, and spent the winter with him on the farm, the last that he (the father) spent on the farm. His father has since died in Ohio. In 1864 Mr. McKibben took a flock of sheep to Iowa for another man, and in 1865 took out a flock, part of which were his own. He wintered in Iowa, and in 1866 came to Missouri, stopping at Osceola till the fall of 1867, when he drove his sheep to Greene county and lot them out "on shares" to S. F. Gibson. He then improved a farm on a tract of railroad land on Grand Prairie, on which he still continues to reside. He joined the Presbyterian church in Springfield, and also the Patrons of Husbandry and Brothers of Freedom. He has held the most important offices in his subordidate grange and also in the county grange. His health failing in early life caused him to become a "vegetarian" and diets himself accordingly on the hygenic system. He neither drinks, uses tobacco, nor takes medicine. Mr. McKibben has no use for Pharisaical religion, but believes in the religion of right doing vs. wrong doing, because it is right—believes in a religion of action, not merely of profession. In politics he is independent, and opposed on principle to monopolies in general and government favors to pet corporations. In appearance Mr. McKibben is a man of medium build, height and weigh, of the blonde type, and is some older looking now than the portrait we publish would indicate. The following is quoted from a delineation given by Prof. Sanford in 1849:

"J. T. McKibben has a predominance of the mental motive temperament, with the vital moderately indicated. His constitution is naturally strong with more than ordinary powers of endurance. He has a fondness for the grand, the sublime and the ideal in nature and art. He has a taste for the exquisite and the embellished, and is fond of painting, drawing and the fine arts. He is original, and with application, might almost excel as an inventor and mechanic. He is disposed to examine, search out, and investigate. Is fond of order, system and refinement, and compares and analyzes to advantage. He is benevolent, humane, kind in disposition, and wishes to benefit those around him." [656]

 

MRS. NANCY M. MCKIBBEN. This lady was born at Solon, Cortland county, New York, in the year 1820. Her ancestors were Quakers, who came from Europe at an early day, and were probably in the Penn colony. Her parents, Stephen and Lydia Potter, were natives of Washington county, New York, where they were born in 1776, and were afterwards married. They removed as early as 1800 to Cortland county, and, were among the pioneers of that section. Here they made a home and lived in this new country till they had reared to majority five sons and six daughters. The Potters dropped the Quaker religion and became Baptists, being charter members of the first church organized in that region, and their latch string always hung out to the itinerant preacher, the only kind then known thereabouts. Educational advantages were limited. Schools were of one primitive kind, and as people then raised, spun, wove, and made-up their own clothing material, the time of both boys and girls was demanded largely at home to the necessary neglect of the schools. Notwithstanding these disadvantages, seven of the Potter family became school teachers; the oldest son finally becoming eminent as a Baptist minister. Still another son became an eminent physician and medical author. The subject of this sketch was the tenth child, and began teaching at the age of seventeen, and taught her first school in her native town. For this labor she received the astounding sum of seventy cents per week, and "boarded round!" On becoming more experienced, her salary was actually raised to one dollar per week.! As late as 1845, she taught in her native town for the last named price per week. Her higher education was acquired at the academies of Courtland and Courtlandville (two different institutions in the same county), and teaching in the intervals of her attendance. She gave up the principalship of the Union Schools at McGrawville to care for her aged father in his decline, who died in February, 1849. After next teaching a select school, she secured a position in Elmira Female Academy, where she taught and studied two terms. In the summer of 1850, she opened a female seminary in Penn Yan, but abandoned that enterprise to care for her aged and infirm mother till her death in 1851. In the spring of 1851 she began teaching as the principal of Syracuse Female Seminary, continuing till the winter of 1852-3. She entered Oberlin College, Ohio, the following fall, in which institution she remained till the fall of 1856, studying Greek and Latin, while herself teaching the higher English branches. In November of that year she married Mr. J. T. McKibben, a former student of Oberlin. Mrs. McKibben continued teaching in Oberlin till 1864, when she accompanied her husband on his tour to Iowa and Missouri, finally locating with him in Greene county. [See Biog. of J. T. McKibben.] Here her time and attention were taken up in the discharge of duties incident to the opening of new farm, in which she took great interest. Still attached to her former vocation, in 1878, 1880 and 1882, she again taught in the intervals of her other duties. On account, however, of a partial deafness, she was forced to abandon teaching, and has since given close attention to her household duties. Though still she visits schools and writes and canvasses for educational journals in her spare time. Mrs. McKibben is a member of the Calvary Presbyterian church of Springfield, and is a member of the order of Patrons of Husbandry. In early life—at the age of fifteen—she had connected herself with the Baptist church. She took great interest in Sabbath schools and missionary enterprises, organizing such schools, societies and benevolent institutions, and was often selected to write essays on anniversary occasions of missionary societies. Since joining the P. of H. she has held important offices in the subordinate and county grange. She was elected secretary of Springfield district grange in 1878, and has held that position for five consecutive terms. In 1880 she was chosen lecturer by the last named grange, and also deputy of Greene county, and was recommissioned for the same in 1881. In 1879-80, she was delegate to the State Grange, at each session of which she delivered an address. She has delivered many addresses at grange meetings, picnics, Farmers' alliance meetings, etc., always with a view of benefiting her race. Want of space forbids the extended mention, together with quotations from many favorable press comments, that Mrs. McKibben has received and so justly deserves. She has studied well the laws of correct living, and has put her hygienic theories into beneficiary practice. This has made her a woman of great physical endurance and mental activity and it is a remarkable fact—that during a life of forty-five years as student and teacher, she never lost a day on account of sickness! The winter of her sixtieth year, this remarkable woman taught a school two and a half miles from home, to which she walked back and forth every school day for four months, aggregating a distance of 400 miles, at the same time doing her own housework, including laundry! Taken all and all, this lady is one of the most decided characters in Greene county; and her many labors of love in the "cause of human elevation," will be remembered here and hereafter. [657]

AMOS G. MOUNT. This gentleman is the son of Amos and Charlotta (Woodsmall) Mount, and was born in Oldham county, Ky., May 17, 1841. He was educated in the common schools of his vicinity, and grew to manhood upon the farm. In October, 1861, he enlisted in company B, 6th Kentucky regiment, infantry, U. S. A., and participated in the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesborough, and Woodbury, Tenn. January, 1868, he was severely wounded in the right arm, breaking the bone and disabling him for active service for some time. After his wound healed be returned to his regiment and served until his three years' term of service had expired, and was discharged at Nashville in October, 1864. He then returned to Kentucky, and in 1865 he came to Scotland county, Missouri, and in 1868 he came to Greene county where he has since resided and followed farming, owning two farms of 100 acres each. He has been a Mason since 1865, and a member of the Baptist church since 1858. In 1869 Mr. Mount was married to Miss Ellen Hacker, of this county. She died December 26, 1870, and November 8, 1872, he was married the second time to Mrs. Kate Frazier, nee Tatum, daughter of Lewis F. and Sarah (Robinson) Tatum, of this county. She was born in 1846 and has never eaten a Christmas dinner outside of her father's house. She was first married to Samuel Frazier, who died ten months thereafter. Mr. and Mrs. Mount are blessed with three children, Frank C., Sallie C., and Amos L.

PLEASANT T. PROPHET. The subject of this sketch is a son of Arnton and Jemima (Brigham) Prophet, and was born in McMinn county, Tennessee, August 31, 1835, where be continued to reside till 1852, when he moved with his parents to Greene county, Missouri, and settled at the head of Clear creek. Here he engaged in farming till 1881, when he sold his farm and embarked in the mercantile business at Bois D'Arc, of which place he is one of the leading business men as well as a highly respected citizen. He joined the M. E. Church South, at twelve years of age, and has constantly adhered to the faith since then, filling creditably the several functions of steward, secretary, class-leader, and trustee of the church. He was one of the original members in the organization of the church on Clear creek. He was married in 1858, to Miss Nancy Barrett, of Greene county. She died in 1862, having had two children, one—Sarah J.—still survives her. Mr. Prophet was a second time married in 1868, to Miss Blackwell, daughter of Sylvester and Martha Blackwell, of this county. Seven children have been born to this union, all of whom are still living, and are an honor to their parents.

JESSE O. RFDFEARN. Mr. Redfearn is the son of Josiah and Lucy K. Bennett) Redfearn, old settlers of Greene county, the former a native of Tennessee, and the latter of North Carolina. Jesse was born in this county, April, 10, 1856, and was reared on the farm and educated in the common schools. Like his father, he, too, became a farmer, and continued in that vocation till 1882, when, moving to Bois D'Arc, he engaged in the mercantile business with Messrs. Hoyal and Johnson, the firm style being Hoyal, Redfearn & Johnson. Mr. Redfearn was married December 21, 1877, to Miss Catherine H., daughter of Benjamin B. and Celia B. Johnson, of Greene county. Mr. and Mrs. R. have had three children, named respectively, Bertha C., Carrie J., and William E. Mr. Redfearn has amassed what he possesses by his own industry and thrift, and owns, besides other property, a well-improved farm of sixty-five acres.

JOSIAH F. REDFEARN. Mr. Redfearn is the son of Townley and Sarah (Mason) Redfearn, and was born in Robertson county Tenn., July 23, 1880. His parents were natives of North Carolina, but were reared in Tennessee. They emigrated to Greene county, Missouri, in 1887. His father died in 1838, leaving his mother with a family of six children. His mother died in 1880, being eighty-three years of age. His grandfather, Jesse Mason, preached the first sermon in the western part of the county, at the house of Josiah's father. Josiah received his education in the county, going to the first school taught in the township. He has always followed farming, and served as school director several terms. He saw six months' active service in the militia in his brother's company. He owns 160 acres of good land, the result of his industry and perseverance. Mr. Redfearn was married February 3, 1848 to Miss Lucy K., daughter of Perminter and Sarah (Kelsey) Bennett. They were natives of South Carolina, but moved to Greene county, Mo., in 1840. Mr. and Mrs. Redfearn have had ten children, seven of whom are now living. Mr. Redfearn is one of the best citizens of Center township. [658]

DAVID M. RITTER. Mr. Ritter is the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Miller) Ritter, and was born in St. Joseph county, Indiana, February 10, 1843. His grandfather was a soldier of the Revolution, and was one of the men who threw the tea overboard in Boston Harbor. David grew to manhood upon the farm, and in July, 1862, he enlisted in the 21st Indiana battery, and was at the battles of Rome, Gainesboro, Carthage, Hoover's Gap, Cattle Gap, Chickamauga, Nashville and Columbia, besides many smaller engagements. He held the rank of corporal, and was mustered out June 26, 1865. He came to Greene county, Missouri, in 1866 and located upon Leeper prairie, where he lived two years, and then came to the farm upon which he now lives, containing two hundred and seventy acres, well watered and stocked. It has fourteen hundred bearing apple trees, one thousand of which were of big own planting. Mr. Ritter was married May 30, 1872, to Miss Josephine, daughter of Joseph and Lucinda Martin, of Greene county. Her father was a soldier in the Mexican war. Mr. and Mrs. Ritter have three children, Howard J., Clara L. and Ethel.

JOHN B. ROBINSON. This gentleman is the son of Charles and Sarah (Barham) Robinson, and was born in Stokes county, North Carolina, March 2, 1810. His parents were natives of that State, and his grandfather was a soldier in the Revolution. The parents of John B. moved to Lyon county, Kentucky, the same year he was born. It was here he grow to manhood upon the farm and received his education. For some time after he was grown he drove the stage between Russellville and Bowling Green, Kentucky. In 1837 he came to Polk county, Missouri, and engaged in farming. In 1844 he moved to this county and settled upon the place where he now resides. He is one of the pioneers of the county and has seen many changes come to the people and the face of the country. He owns a fine farm of four hundred acres, and has accumulated it all since coming to the county. Mr. Robinson was married in 1840 to Miss Louisa E., daughter of Geo. H. and Susan (Gee) Irwin, of Polk county, Missouri. Her parents were natives of North Carolina, and her father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was at the battle of New Orleans. They have had seven children, five of whom are now living, Geo. W., James F., Sarah S., Mary L. and.Martha J. They are all married and living in Greene county. Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have been members of the Baptist church for over forty years. He is regarded as one of the best citizens of the county.

EDWIN D. ROBINSON, M. D. The professional gentleman whose name heads this sketch is a native of this state, and was born in Chillicothe November 2d, 1854. His parents were Edwin and Eliza (nee Cravens) Robinson. He grew up in the town of his birth, and there, acquired his elementary education. Subsequently, he attended Central college at Fayette, Missouri, and in 1875, commenced the study of medicine under Dr. Ross of Springfield. He entered the Missouri medical college of St. Louis, in 1877, graduating with the degree of M. D. in 1879. Soon after be located for practice at Bois D'Arc, this county. In 1881, he entered Bellevue hospital medical college of New York, graduating from there in March, 1882. After practicing three months in the hospital department he returned to Bois D'Arc, where he is enjoying a fine practice and taking a leading rank among the M. D.s of the Southwest. [659]

LEONARD M. SIMS, M. D. The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is a native of Polk county, this State, born January 16, 1856, and a son of B. D. and Blize A. Sims, the father being a native of North Carolina, and the mother of Virginia. They came to Missouri. in 1832, and the year succeeding the birth of Dr. Leonard M., moved to this (Greene) county where they remained till 1870. The family then removed to Benton county, Arkansas, where the doctor grew up and completed his general education, attending Pea Ridge high school three years and the State Industrial University for one year. During the years 1877-8-9, he taught school and read medicine, his preceptor being Dr. Clarl,, of Bentonville, Arkansas. In 1880 he entered the Missouri medical college at St. Louis, graduating with the degree of M. D. in 1882. He then located for the practice at Bois D'Arc, in November of same year, where he is building up a fine practice. Few young physicians enjoy the confidence of the people to a greater extent than Dr. Sims. He is a hard student, and keeps a well "read up" in his profession. He was married September 10, 1882, to Miss Mattie Bond of Greene county. Both Dr. Sims and wife are members of the Methodist church.

JAMES SQUIBB. This gentleman is the son of Caleb and Susan (Johnson) Squibb, and was born in Washington county, Tennessee, December 15th, 1818. His grandfather upon his father's side came from Ireland, and upon his mother's side from England. Mr. Squibb's father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and both of his parents were natives of Tennessee. James grew to manhood in Washington and Greene counties, Tennessee, and was educated in the subscription schools of that section. He followed farming in Greene county Tennessee, until 1851, when he moved to Greene county, Missouri, where he has since lived, and is one of the most substantial, honorable citizens of the county. He has been a member of the Methodist church since he was seventeen years of age, and his wife has also been a member, of that church for over forty-five years. He has filled the office of justice of the peace for fourteen years, school director for thirty years, and township clerk for five years. He hits always been a strong Union man, and lost heavily during the war, Price's men stripping him of all but his land. He owns a fine farm of two hundred and thirty acres of land, and has given eight of his children one thousand dollars each. He was married February 14th, 1837, to Miss Rachel, daughter of Joseph and Naney (Bacon) Shields, of Washington county, Tennessee. Their union has been blest with eleven children, nine sons and two daughters.

GEORGE STONES. Mr. Stones is the son of George and Sarah (Walbank) Stones, and was born at Blackburn, Lancastershire, England, May 28th, 1836. At the age of fourteen he was apprenticed for seven years to learn the trade of a bricklayer. He worked at his trade in England until 1874 when he came to the United States and settled in Greene county, Missouri. Since coming here he has been engaged at his trade and in farming. He helped to build Drury College and some of the best residences in the county being an excellent workman. Mr. Stones was married July 28th, 1861, to Miss Mary A., daughter of Jaynes and Mary (Arnold) Lawson, of his native county in England. Their union has been blest with eleven children, seven of whom are living, viz.: Richard, Fielding, Mary, James, Sarah E., George and Hannah.

ANDREW C. SWINNEY is a brother of R. H. Swinney (see sketch) and was born in Rockcastle county, Kentucky, February 19th, 1843. He was reared in East Tennessee, and received his education partly there and partly in his native state. He began learning the mercantile business as a clerk in 1866, and the succeeding year went into business for himself in partnership with a man by whose dishonesty, Mr. Swinney lost heavily. In 1873, he moved to Greene county, engaging in farming, in which vocation he has by thrift and economy again placed himself in good circumstances. In 1882, he purchased a half interest in his younger brother's drug store, but still continues to operate his farm. He was married November 14th, 1863, and has seven children, four of whom,—Benjamin A., Vinton, and a pair of infant twins, still survive at this writing. Mr. Swinney has been a member of the Chriatian church since he was fifteen years old, and is a worthy and exemplary citizen. [660]

R. H. SWINNEY was born in Rockcastle county, Kentucky, August 1, 1850. His parents Robert and Lydia Swinney, were both natives of Kentucky, and his paternal grandfather served as a soldier in the Revolution of 1776, dying at the age of one hundred years. B. H. Swinney was educated at Gilmore Seminary and the University of Kentucky, and subsequently engaged in teaching and farming. In 1877, he came to Ash Grove, in Greene county, and served as principal of the school there till 1880; then after teaching two terms at Bois D'Arc, he engaged in the drug business, and still successfully follows that vocation. At fourteen years old, he joined the Christian church, and soon became leader of the choir. At twenty-five he was made an elder in the church. March 19, 1874, he married Miss Susan, daughter of Thomas G. and Elizabeth Lawrence, with whom be had been intimate in early childhood, she being a native of same county, and her parents also being Kentuckians. They have had three children, two of whom still survive. Mr. Swinney is noble grand of the I. O. O. F. lodge at Bois D'Arc, and his wife, like himself, is a member of the Christian church.

LEWIS F. TATUM. Mr. Tatum is the son of Rev. William and Phoebe (Barham) Tatum. His father was a native of North Carolina, and died in Greene county, Mo., in 1856. His maternal grandfather, James Barham, was a native of Virginia and a soldier of the Revolution. He, too, died in this county, aged 103 years. Lewis F. was born in Logan county, Ky, Nov. 4, 1812, where he grew up and resided till his removal to this county in 1836. He settled on the Leeper prairie fourteen miles from Springfield, there being no house at that time between his and that town. In 1812, he moved to the farm where he now resides, and has steadily followed the vocation of farming. Though he was. three hundred dollars in debt when he first came to the county, he is now out of debt, and owns a good farm of 160 acres in Center township all made by his own industry and economy. At the outbreak of the war, he joined Capt. Campbell's company of Confederate State Guards, and although fifty years of age, he served out his term of enlistment, and was in the battle of Dry Springs and Wilson's Creek, and at the latter had his horse killed under him. Mr. Tatum was married December 22, 1855, to Miss Sarah Robinson, daughter of Littleberry Robinson, of Logan county Kentucky. Her grandfather, like his, was also a Revolutionary soldier. Mr. and Mrs. Tatum had eight children, four of whom—Cornelia, B., Phoebe C., Jemima B., and Henry T.—still survive. They had two sons in the Confederate army—Columbus, who was killed at Glasgow, and John who died in Arkansas. Mr. Tatum is remarkably active for a man of his age. He has been a Freemason for 16 years, and was a charter member of Bois D'Arc lodge. He also belongs to the Baptist church, and is a worthy and honorable citizen, respected by his neighbors and loved and honored by his family. [661]

S. SPENCER TRACY. Mr. Tracy is the son of Seymour and Ellen (Kelland) Tracy, and was born in Yates county, New York, July 25, 1844. His father was born in 1804, and from 1839 to 1879 did an extensive milling and grain business at Penn Yan, New York, with a mill of four hundred barrels capacity per day. Spencer grew to manhood and was educated in his native county. He began learning the machinist's trade at the age of sixteen, and in 1862 he went to Springfield, Massachusetts, and worked in the United States armory. In 1864, he took a course in Burman's commercial college, graduating in 1865. He was then appointed government inspector, to inspect cavalry equipments at Newark, Now Jersey, which position he held until the war closed. In 1866 he went to Kansas City, Missouri, and that fall went to Galva, Illinois, where he clerked in a store for two years and then went to Van Buren, Arkansas, staying there four years, and in 1873, he moved to Greene county, Missouri, where he has since resided. He owns a farm of two hundred acres, and is one of the rising young farmers of the county. Mr. Tracy was married November 3, 1873, to Miss Jennie, daughter of Ellis O. and Parthens (Bryant) Powell, of this county. By their marriage they have five children, viz.: Maud, Ellen, Seymour, Clara and Freddie. Mr. Tracy has been a member of the A. F. and A. M. society since he was twenty-one years of age.

HON. WILLIAM H. WADE. This gentleman is the son of Isaac S. and Eleanor (Lamb) Wade, and was born in Clarke county, Ohio, November 3, 1835. His father was a native of Virginia, and was for thirty years a justice of the peace. His mother was born in Ohio, and her father was a captain in the war of 1812. William H. grew to manhood in his native county, where he was educated, finishing his education at Antioch college. He followed farming and teaching until the civil war began, and went out at the first call of troops as 1st lieutenant of a company in the 16th Ohio regiment. He was mustered out as lieut. colonel in April, 1866, having served five years and nine days. He was at the battles of Corinth, Murfroesboro, Chickamauga and all the battles in the department of the Cumberland. On May, 1866, be moved to Saline, county, Missouri, where he lived until 1874. He then came to Greene county, and in 1880 he was elected to the Legislature, and re-elected in 1882. He was one of the ablest members of that body. Mr. Wade was married in 1867 to Miss Mary, daughter of William and Lydia (Price) Knott, of Clark county, Ohio. Their union has been blest with six children, four of whom are living.

GRANVILLE H. WATTS. This gentleman is the son of Joseph and Patsey Watts, and was born in Halifax county, Virginia, July 6th, 1818. His parents were native Virginians, and his father was a soldier n the farm, and at the in the war of 1812. He grow to manhood in his native county. Upon age of twenty-five he learned the saddler's trade, which he has followed in connection with farming until the present. In 1867 he went to Lincoln county, Kentucky, where he carried on the saddlery business at Crab Orchard until 1879. He then came to this county, settling at Ash Grove, but in 1880 removed to Greenfield, and in 1881 came back to Greene and located permanently at Bois D'Arc, where he and his nephew carried on the saddle and harness business very successfully. Mr. Watts has reared two of his nephews, though never married. He has been a consistent member of the Methodist church for forty years, and is regarded by all as an upright, Christian gentleman.

HENRY WATTS. Henry Watts is the son of Milton and Lucinda (Brown) Watts, who were natives of Virginia, and his grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812. Henry was born in Scott county, Virginia, March 7th, 1845, and when twelve years of age he went with his uncle, Granville R. Watts, to Lincoln county, Kentucky, where he was reared, working on the farm and at the saddler's trade with his uncle. He lived in that county until 1879, when he came to Ash Grove, Greene county, Missouri, where he engaged in the harness and saddlery business. In 1880 he went to Greenfield, and in 1881 located at Bois D'Arc, where they are now doing a flourishing business. He also owns one hundred and twenty acres of land, the result of his industry and energy. Mr. Watts is a member of the I. O. O. F. and is one of the most substantial citizens of Bois D'Arc. [662]

 JAMES T. WEST. Mr. West is the son of Edward and Elizabeth (Gilmore) West, and was born in Greene county, Missouri, March 7th, 1841. His parents were natives of Tennessee, and were among the earliest settlers of Center township, in Greene county. James grew to manhood here, where he was educated. In 1862, when he was but eighteen years of age, he enlisted in company H, 8d Missouri cavalry, C. S. A., and served until the close of the war. He was under Gen. Marmaduke for over two years. He was in the battles of Little Rock and Cape Girardeau, and in Price's raid. He was wounded at Jenkin's Ferry, Ark., in 1864, and surrendered at Shreveport, La., in 1865. He then went to Pettis county where he lived until 1868, when he returned to Greene, and has since been engaged in farming. He owns one hundred and ninety acres of good land, and is one of Greene's most respected and useful citizens. He belongs to the I. O. O. F., and is a trustee in the Baptist church. He was married Sept. 1st, 1870, to Miss Margaret E., daughter of Andrew and Susan (Redferan) Leeper of this county. Their union has been blest with four children, three of whom are now living, viz.: Albert E., Hugh G. and Stella C.

EDWARD WEST. This gentleman is the son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Thompson) West, and was born in Grainger county, Tenn., Nov. 18, 1807. His parents were natives of Virginia, and his father was a captain of a company raised for the war of 1812, but was not called into active service. Edward West grew to manhood in his native county, where he lived until 1839, when he moved to Greene county, Missouri, and settled upon the place where he now resides. He was married March 10th, 1882, to Elizabeth, daughter of Hugh and Sarah (Gallion) Gilmore, of Grainger county, Tenn. She died in 1878, and Mr. West was married the second time to Mrs. Nancy Nelherton, nee Morris, of Lawrence county, Mo., upon the 18th of February, 1879. He reared a family of five sons and four daughters. Mr. West came to Greene county when game was abundant and neighbors lived far apart. He has seen many changes come over the face of the country and to the people, and went through all the trials of pioneer life. He has been a consistent member of the Baptist church for over fifty years. He has always given liberally to the church, and his hand is ever ready to assist any deserving enterprise. He owned a farm of over six hundred acres of land, but has given it all, except eighty acres, to his children. Mr. West is yet active for a man of his age, and reads without spectacles.

JOHN D. L. WILEY. Mr. Wiley is the son of Elijah and Ann B. (Waddill) Wiley, and was born in Cocke county, Tennessee, November 1, 1832. His parents were natives of that State, and his father was a soldier in the war of 1812. Both of his grandfathers were soldiers in the Revolutionary war. John came to Greene county, Missouri, with his parents in 1837, where he grew to manhood and has since resided. His parents moved to Texas in 1858, where his mother died in 1863, and his father in 1868. In July 1862, John D. L. Wiley enlisted in company A, 8th Missouri cavalry, U. S. A. He was in the battles of Prairie Grove, Little Rock, and Ashley Station, and numerous skirmishes in Missouri, Arkansas, and Kansas. In the spring of 1865 he lost his health and was discharged on account of disability in June of that year. He then returned home and has been engaged in farming. He owns a farm of one hundred and twenty acres of land, made by his own industry and energy. Mr. Wiley was married, September 20, 1854, to Miss Rufina J., daughter of James and Jane (Stockton) Hughes, of this county, formerly of Alabama. Her father was a soldier of the Mexican war, and was in the Union service during the rebellion, as was four of his sons. He was wounded at the battle of Pea Ridge, and died from its effects within a few days. Mr. and Mrs. Wiley have had nine children eight of whom are living, viz.: Nettie J., Jesse M., Martha M., Nancy B., George S., Lillie E., Lucy M., and Charles E. Mr. Wiley has been a member of the Methodist church for thirty years, and is one of the best citizens in the county. [663]

GEORGE J. WILEY. Mr. Wiley is the son of Elijah and Ann (Waddill) Wiley, and was born in Cocke county, Tennessee, July 27, 1829. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812, as was his grandfather upon his mother's side. His mother was a sister of Judge Waddill. His parents moved to Greene county, Missouri, in 1837, and built the house in which the first school was taught in Center township. He moved to Texas in 1858, where he died in 1868, and his wife died in 1863. He was a strong Union man, but had two sons in the Federal army, and two in the Confederate army. George J. has lived in this county since coming here with his father in 1887. In 1862 he enlisted in the 8th Missouri cavalry, U. S. A. He served under Gens. Herron and Davidson in Southwest Missouri and Arkansas. He was at the battle of Little Rock, and upon many skirmishing and scouting expeditions. He was promoted to sergeant and served until the war closed. He then returned to Greene county, where he has since been engaged in farming. He has a good farm of two hundred acres and is well fixed to enjoy life. He was married September 24, 1848, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of James and Jane (Stockton) Hughes. Her father was a soldier in the Mexican war, and in the Federal service during the civil war. He was wounded at the battle of Pea Ridge and died from the effects of the wound. The married life of Mr. and Mrs. Wiley has been blest with twelve children, nine of whom are still living, viz.: John H., James F., Lenora A., Rachel J., George L., Margaret C., Mary B., Nancy and William. Mr. Wiley has been a member of the Methodist church for twenty years.

JACOB WOODWARD. Mr. Woodward is the son of Edward and Mary Woodward, and was born in Robertson county, Tennessee, September 18, 1820. His parents soon after moved to Callaway county, Kentucky, where he grew to manhood. He learned the shoemaker's trade when he was fourteen years of age, which, in connection with farming, has been his calling ever since. In 1848 he moved to Ash Grove, Greene county, Missouri, where be bought out a distillery and carried on the business for some time. In 1859 he moved to the farm where he now lives, where he has since followed farming and shoemaking. He served in the militia from 1863 to the close of the war. He owns a farm of one hundred and sixty acres and has made all he has by his own industry and perseverance. Mr. Woodward was married in 1846 to Miss Susan E., daughter of Charles N. and Sarah G. Robinson, of Greene county, Missouri, formerly from North Carolina. Their union has been blest with seven children, all of whom are living, viz.: Sarah A. P., William H. James R., Ransom B. J., Charles R. E., John A. S., and Mary R. [664]


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