History of Greene County, Missouri
1883

R. I. Holcombe, Editing Historian


Chapter 32
North Springfield

Part 2
Biographies


HUGH L. BALDWIN. Mr. Baldwin is the son of Theophilus and Lucy Baldwin, and was born in Lawrence county, Indiana, November 20, 1838. He was left an orphan at the age of twelve years, and when he was fifteen he went to Richland county, Illinois, where he worked upon a farm. In 1862 he commenced railroading as a brakesman, upon the Chicago, Alton and St. Louis E. B. In ten months he was promoted to freight conductor, and held that position upon that road for seven years. In 1870 he went upon the Burlington and Cedar Rapids R. R., in the same capacity, but in the same year went to the Central Pacific R. R., and was yardmaster at Oakland until 1872. In 1873 he came to Springfield, Mo., and is now one of the most popular and prosperous grocery merchants of North Springfield. Mr. Baldwin is a Royal Arch Mason, and one of the substantial citizens of the county. He was married in 1858, to Miss Sarah J. Philhower, daughter of William and Lucinda Philhower, of Richland county, Ill. Their union has been blest with five children, three of whom are yet living.

B. F. BARNES. Mr. Barnes was born in Circleville, Ohio, October 7, 1846. In 1864 he began railroading upon the Louisville & Nashville railroad, and worked at it for several months. He then returned to his home at Madison, Indiana, where he was engaged in the mercantile business with his father. In 1878 he went to Oswego, Kansas, where he was again engaged in merchandising for four years. Then he was assistant clerk in the county offices at the court house in Oswego, and next joined a civil engineer corps and worked at the business for several months. He then returned to Oswego and worked in the court-house six months. He then was engaged in the construction of a railroad from Parsons to Cherryvale, Kansas. In 1879 and 1881 he was city assessor of Oswego, and in June, 1881, he went to work for the St. L. & S. F. R. R., as clerk for J. & Wentworth, superintendent of the Kansas division of that road, whose office was then at Neodesha, Kansas. Mr. Barnes remained there a year, and was then transferred to North Springfield, where he is clerk in the office of the superintendent of the Missouri & Kansas division of the same road. Mr. Barnes was married upon New Year's eve, 1876, to Miss L. F. Elliott, of Oswego, Kansas. They have one child, Eva Belle. [850]

BENTLY O. BEARDEN. Mr. Bearden is a native of this county, born December 26th, 1856. His parents are Elias M. and Nancy A. Bearden, old settlers of Greene county, who came here in 1841 and settled on the farm on which they reside at this writing, two and a half miles east of Springfield. Soon after coming to this county, Bently O. engaged in farming till 1880, then came to North Springfield and went to work in the railroad machine shops, where he remained until April 1st, 1882, when he was elected city marshal, which position he is still filling. December 25th, 1881, Mr. Bearden married Miss Elizabeth McGowen, of Ozark county, Missouri. Mr. B. is a member of Springfield lodge No. 2285, of the Knights of Honor, and is au efficient public officer, a worthy citizen, and one who receives and deserves the universal esteem of all who know him.

JAMES BECKERLEG. Mr. Beckerleg was born in Ontario, Canada, June 2, 1858. He commenced firing on the St. Louis and San Francisco railway in 1874, and fired until July 2, 1880, when he was promoted engineer, and has been running an engine upon the road ever since. He was married to Miss Martha Franklin. Their union has been blest with two children, Addie May and James. Mr. Beekerleg is a member of Frisco lodge, Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen.

EDWARD BEER. Edward Beer was born in Kent, England, December 4, 1831. When sixteen years old he commenced working in the Northwestern R. R. machine shops in Yorkshire, England, where he learned to be a machinist and worked seven years, Then fired on a locomotive on the above mentioned railroad, for about three and a half years, then took an engine and ran it on that road for twelve years. He came to America in 1870, and has worked at his trade on various roads ever since, excepting about three years of the time he was engaged in farming near Brookline, Missouri. In October, 1882, he took an engine on the St. Louis and San Francisco railway, which he is running at present. Mr. Beer has been twice married. His first wife was Miss Sarah L. Shutt, whom he married in Harrogate, England. She died in Rock Island, Illinois, in 1870. His second wife was a Miss Fanny S. Dennis, of Rock Island, Illinois. He is a member of Division No. 83 Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers; of which he is chaplain.

HENRY S. D. BERRY, M. D. Dr. Berry is the son of Spartan D. and Jane M. Berry, and was born in Anderson county, South Carolina, September 29th, 1868. His maternal grandfather was an officer in the war of 1812, and a general of militia. His father died in 1855, and he and his mother moved to Texas in 1869. He received most of his education from his mother, spending one term at the university. In 1878 he engaged in the drug business, at Dennison, Texas, and in 1874 entered the Louisville Medical College, from which institution he graduated in 1876. Returning to Dennison he commenced practicing his profession, enjoying a lucrative practice. He was health officer and member of the city council of Dennison, resigning when he left in 1881 he entered the St. Louis Medical College, graduating in 1882. He then located at North Springfield, and thus early ranks among the leading physicians of the city, and does a leading practice. The doctor is a Mason, and a member of the Order of Chosen Friends, being their medical examiner. He was married in 1877, to Miss Lou, daughter of John and Mary Murphy, of Franklin county, Missouri. They have one child, James H. [851]

JOHN D. BOSSERT. John D. Bossert is a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was born January 23rd, 1889. When eleven years old he enlisted in the U. S. navy, and served thirteen years. During that time he visited South America, England, France, Spain, Africa and China. After leaving the navy he returned to Pennsylvania, locating at Oil City, and there, worked at the blacksmith trade. In l874 he emigrated to Franklin, Missouri, and worked at his trade in the railroad machine shops eighteen months, then removed to North Springfield, and went to work in the machine shops of the St. Louis and San Francisco railway, where he is at present working at his trade. Mr. Bossert has been twice married. His first wife was Miss Lydia A. Dilks, whom he married in 1859. She died in 1874. On August 2nd, 1875, he married Miss Martha L. Foley, of St. James, Missouri, by whom he has one child, William James Bossert, born July 26th, 1876.

The subject of our sketch is a member of Springfield Lodge, No. 218, L O. O. F., of which he is N. G. He also belongs to Wentworth Lodge, No. 118, A. O. U. W., of which he is M. W.

JOHN E. CAMPBELL. Mr. Campbell is the son of William H. and L. J. Campbell, and was born in Lawrence county, Arkansas, September 21st, 1852. His parents moved to Newton county, Missouri, in 1871, where they are yet living. At the age of twenty-one John commenced driving the stage between Neosho and Joplin, which he followed about a year and then worked in the commission house of Craudus, Winn & Co., of Neosho for about eight months. He then began working on the Neosho section of the railroad, where he worked until 1876, and then commenced braking upon the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad. In 1882 he was promoted conductor, and now runs a train upon the Arkansas branch, between Winslow and Porter. Mr. Campbell was married January 9th, 1879, to Miss L. Robertson, of Ashland, Oregon. Their union is blest with two sons, Fay and Gay.

FRANK CLARK. This gentleman is the son of Thomas and Mary Clark, and was born in Nottinghamshire, England, March 3, 1836. At the age of seventeen he learned the jeweler's trade, and carried on the business at Mislerton, England, until 1878. He then came to the United States, landing at Galveston, Texas. He spent four years in Texas, working at his trade and traveling in different parts of the State. In 1877 he located at North Springfield, Missouri where he has since carried on the jewelry business. He has a nice stock of goods and is one of the best practical jewelers in the Southwest. Mr. Clark was married in 1865 to Miss Mary Gunthrop, of Nottinghamshire, England. Their union has been blest with three sons and four daughters.

JAMES P. COFFEY. Mr. Coffey was born in Kentucky, March 17, 1860. At the age of sixteen he began braking upon the W. & P. R. R., and broke upon that road nine months. He then went home and lived with his father until 1878 when he went on the L. & N. R. R., where he was brakeman two years. In 1880 he changed to the St. Louis & San Francisco R. R. where he braked until December 18, 4882, when he was promoted conductor and is now running a train upon that road. Mr. Coffey was married January 21, 1881, to Miss Harriet Salsman. Though quite young he is regarded as one of the most reliable conductors upon that celebrated road. [852]

SAMUEL R COOPER. Is a native of Missouri, born in Franklin county, January 24th, 1845. In 1858 he began railroading as brakeman in Virginia, continuing about three years. When the war came on, Mr. Cooper enlisted (in Callaway county, Missouri) in the Confederate service, joining company B. first battalion of Missouri volunteer infantry. He was transferred subsequently to company A, first Missouri cavalry, and his regiment assigned to service in Virginia. November, 1863, he was promoted to second lieutenant, and served until the war closed. Returning to Missouri, he went to "braking " on the Missouri Pacific railroad. In 1869 he came on to the "Frisco " line, and in 1878 was given charge of a train as conductor, and at this writing runs his train regularly from North Springfield. He belongs to the Temple of Honor, and also to the Royal T. of H. Mr. Cooper was married October 3rd, 1872, to Miss Anna Kennedy, and has, at this writing, three children.

JOHN F. CRUTCHER is a son of Dr. A. L. Crutcher, both the doctor and wife being natives of Kentucky. In l862 the family moved to Indiana and lived there till 1868, when they moved to Missouri. They first stopped at Leasburg, but two years latter moved to St. James, remaining there till the spring of 1873, then moving to Springfield, this county. Dr. Crutcher died, leaving a wife, four sons (John F., Leonidas C., William C., and Luke F.) and one daughter (Mollie), wife of S. L. McLane, of the St. L. & S. F. R. R. Dr. Crutcher had been forced to sacrifice his property in Kentucky owing to war troubles. The expense of moving his family a great distance left him on reaching Springfield with very small means. The sons began railroading very young, and worked their way up to positions of conductors on the road, and acquired means sufficient to place themselves in easy circumstances. The subject of this sketch was born November 10, 1858. He commenced "braking " on the railroad in 1872, and four years subsequent accepted the position of baggage master, and in 1879 was promoted to a conductorship on the St. L. & S. F. December 21, 1878, he married Miss Catharine Jones, of Anderson county, Kentucky. They have one child, Edgar L., born October 80, 1880. Mr. Crutcher is senior conductor of Ozark lodge, No. 30, Order of Railway Conductors, and is also a member of Springfield lodge, No. 218, I. O. O. F.

LEONIDAS COLEMAN CRUTCHER is a son of Dr., elsewhere mentioned, and was born April 16, 1855. In 1870 he began "braking" on a train of St. L. and S. F., and worked for a while as brakeman, then baggage master, next yard master, from which he was promoted to conductor. He has at this writing been running a train five years. On November 26,1880, he married Miss Sallie A. McFee, of Springfield. They have one child, a daughter named Gracie, born October 17, 1881. Mr. Crutcher is a member of the Gate of the Temple Lodge, No. 218, and Umpire Encampment, No. 42, I O. O. F. He was a charter member of Ozark Division, No. 80, Order of Railway Conductors, which order he has served officially.

LUKE F. CRUTCHER. The youngest son of Dr. Crutcher, born March 24, 1858. He was also the youngest conductor that ever ran a train on the St. Louis & San Francisco railroad. He began railroading on that line at the age of fourteen, and at the age of seventeen they put him in charge of a freight train which he conducted for over two years. He was then promoted and given a passenger train which he is running at this writing. On the 3rd of June, 1880, he married Mary L., daughter of A. D. Crenshaw, an old citizen of Greene county. They have one son, Luke Allen, born May 24, 1882. Mr. Crutcher is a member of St. John's Commandery, No. 20, Knights Templar. [853]

REV. J. HERVEY DOBBS. Mr. Dobbs wits born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, March 24,1844, and is the son of Bennett and Nancy Dobbs. After having served in the State and National Guards, he enlisted for government service in the civil war, in the Mississippi squadron, being assigned to duty on gunboat Silver Lake, No. 28, where he remained till the war closed. He was mustered out June 26,1865, at Mound City, Illinois, and soon afterwards entered Genesee Wesleyan seminary, of New York State, where be completed his education. He then went into the mercantile business, till 1876, when, by the urgent importunities of his friends he was induced to enter the temperance work as a lecturer, and also lectured on other subjects. Subsequently, he entered on the ministerial work, as a local preacher in the M. E. church, though he still continued his temperance work till the spring of 1878, when he was appointed State deputy and lecturer of the I O. G. T. of Pennsylvania. While holding that position he was appointed secretary of the executive committee of the Pennlsylvania State Temperance Union, and placed in charge of the legislative work in behalf of temperance. In March, 1881, he resigned his position and took a transfer from the Central Pennsylvania conference to the St. Louis conference, and was stationed at North Springfield, Greene county. Mr. Dobbs was married December 28,1868, to Miss Mary Johnston, of Dunkirk, N. Y. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Dobbs, two of whom still survive, named, Mary D. and Nettie M. These children Mr. Dobbs and wife have taken great pains to rear and educate properly, teaching them the religion that gives the greatest value to life. Mr. D. was assigned to a charge in Kansas City early in 1888.

A. B. DODSON. This gentleman is the son of James M. and Mary Dodson, and was born in Maury county, Tennessee, February 11, 1847. His parents are yet living upon the old homestead in Tennessee. He came to Missouri in 1870, and farmed three years in Greene county. He then moved into Springfield and engaged in business. He began firing upon the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad in December, 1880, and has recently been promoted engineer, and is now running an engine upon that road. Mr. Dodson was married in 1870 to Miss F. E. McMeen, of Maury county, Tenn. They have one child, Olivia, born December 16, 1871.

PHILANDER E. DRYDEN. The subject of our sketch is a son of James and Mary Dryden. He is a native of Rockbridge county, Virginia. When twenty-one years old he went to Huntsville, Alabama, and there worked at the carpenter's trade three years, then went to St. Louis, Missouri, and worked for a few months at his trade. In 1874 Mr. Dryden commenced braking on a freight train on the St. Louis and San Francisco railway, and three years thereafter was promoted to freight conductor, which position he holds at present. He is a member of Ozark Division No. 30, Order of Railway Conductors, of which he was one of the charter members.

JOSEPH A. DRYDEN. The subject of this sketch was born in Lawrence county, Missouri, January 13th, 1853. On the 2nd, of June, 1877, he commenced "firing" on the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad, running in that capacity till March, 1882, when he was promoted to the position of engineer, which he still continues to hold. Mr. Dryden is a member of Star Lodge No. 20, K. of P., and also belongs to the Frisco Lodge No. 51, B. of L. F., of which he is master. Besides these, he holds membership in the Locomotive Fireman's Mutual Benefit Association. January 28th, 1880, he married Miss Sivinnia Whitworth, of Franklin county, Missouri. They have one child, a son, named William A., born September 6, 1882.

GUSTAVE ECKSTORM. Mr. Eckstorm was born in St. Louis, Missouri, October 12th, 1856. When he was about fourteen years of age he went upon the Missouri Pacific railroad as a brakeman, and worked at it about a year. In 1879 he came on the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad and braked until 1880, when he was promoted conductor, and is now running a train. Mr. Eckstorm was married December 16th, 1880, to Miss Mary Wahl, of Pacific, Missouri. He is a member of Pacific Lodge No. 122, Ancient Order of United Workingmen. [854]

JOHN EGAN was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, May 8, 1849. In 1869 he began "firing" on the Pennsylvania Central railroad, continuing four years, when he was given charge of in engine and ran it till 1880. He then came to Missouri and took charge of an engine on the St. L. &, S. F. R. R., which engagement he still holds. He was a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, Division 104, of Columbia, Pennsylvania, for six years, from which he took a withdrawal card and joined the Pacific City, Division 83, B. of L. E., and is still a member of the same. January 13, 1872, he married Miss Nettie E. Fairlamb, of Columbia, Pennsylvania. They have had four children--Annie, Maggie and Nellie, who still survive, and Edgar, who died in 1876.

DANIEL H. ELWOOD. Mr. Elwood is a son of Henry and Nancy (Diendorff) Elwood, and was born in Herkimer county, New York, March 12, 1821. He grew to manhood upon the farm, which business he followed until 1858. He then went to Ohio where he was foreman of a force of men upon the Marietta & Cincinnati R. R. for a year. In 1864 he worked upon Illinois Central R. R., and from 1865 to 1866, he was roadmaster of a division and land agent for that road. In 1866 he engaged in the lumber and planing mill business at Decatur, Illinois. In 1870 he went to Michigan, where he engaged extensively in the lumber business. He sold out in 1877 and moved to Butler county, Kansas, and engaged in the hotel business at Augusta. He next bought fed, and shipped hogs until April, 1882, when he came to North Springfield, where he has charge of the St. L. & S. F. R. R. eating house. Mr. Elwood was married in 1844 to Miss Jennie Jones of Herkimer, New York. She died in 1859. She left three children, two of whom are living, viz.: William B., head salesman in a mercantile house at Decatur, Illinois, and Celia A., wife of D. R. Hampashire, editor of the Decatur Republican. Mr. Elwood was married the second time, in 1865, to Mrs. Ellen E. Litton, of Jacksonville, Illinois. Before the war Mr. Elwood's father was colonel of the 192nd New York militia, and Daniel was adjutant of the regiment for four years.

GEORGE SMITH ESCOTT. Mr. Escott is the son of Joseph and Betsy Escott, and was born March 23rd, 1846, in Kent county, Michigan. He was educated in the Grand Rapids high school, and began teaching when he was nineteen years of age. In 1868 he taught a graded school at Big Rapids, Michigan, and in 1870 he came to Springfield, Missouri, and taught a subscription school in North Springfield for seven months, assisted by his wife and sister-in-law Miss Nellie Snow. From there he went to Houston, Texas county, Missouri, where be taught the Houston public school acceptably for five years. He next went to Mountain Grove and taught five years, and from there to West Plains and taught one year. He then accepted the position of principal of the North Springfield public schools, which position he now holds, with three assistant teachers. On the 3rd of July, 1868, he was married to Miss Lettie W., daughter of John and Jerusha Snow, by whom he has had two children, viz.: Nellie and Albert. During his vacations he has written historical sketches of the counties in which he lived, and in 1878 published the Springfield and North Springfield history and directory. Mr. Escott is one of the best educators in this section, and one of the substantial men of the city. [855]

BENJAMIN A. FAY. Mr. Fay is the son of Lorenzo D. and Deborah (Richmond) Fay, and was born in Vermont, Sept. 16, 1832. His ancestors were from England and among the first settlers of Vermont, three of the Fays being soldiers in the Revolutionary war. Benjamin was educated in his native State, and at the age of twenty-one learned the carriage maker's trade, and in 1856 went to Winneshiek county, Iowa, where he worked at his trade. In April, 1861, he enlisted in company A, 1st Iowa cavalry. He did duty in North Missouri in 1861, and in 1862 he was at the battles of Lone Jack, Prairie Grove and Iron Mountain. He was also in the battle at Little Rock, and was under Gen. Steele upon Bank's Red River campaign. He was at the engagements at Camden and Bayou Metre. In 1861 he went back to North Missouri. His company was body guard for Gen. Fish, and during Price's raid was body guard for Gen. Rosencranz. They were next sent to Memphis, and after the war they went to Texas to look after government property. They were discharged in the spring of 1866, Mr. Fay having served five years. He came to Springfield, Missouri, in 1866, and worked at carpentering and building until 1869. He then worked in the Frisco shops until 1877. He now has a hotel and restaurant, and from a capital of one hundred and fifty dollars he has accumulated property to the amount of ton thousand dollars. Mr. Fay was married in 1860 to Miss Kate Norton, of Iowa. They have two children, viz.: Frank and Nellie.

EDWIN L. FAY. Mr. Fay was born at Barnard, Orange county, Vermont, August 5th, 1849. He is the son of Lorenzo D. and Lavinia B. Fay, who are natives of Vermont, and are now living at Palatine, Cook county, Illinois. They emigrated to Iowa in 1862, and settled in Butler county, but removed to their present home in 1864. Edwin L. Fay commenced railroading in September, 1867, on the Chicago and Northwestern, and ran upon that road until 1870. In March, 1871, he ran as a brakesman upon the popular "Frisco" road for four months, and then took charge of the yards at Springfield. He next was an "extra" freight conductor for eight months, and was then promoted to the position of a regular conductor on a freight. In March, 1878, he was given a passenger train, as conductor, which responsible position he still holds. Mr. Fay was married on the 27th of August, 1878, to Miss Dot Kern, of St. James, Missouri. This union has been blest with three children, two of whom--Edith Grace and Ethel Idelle--are living. Mr. Fay is a member of St. John's Commandery No. 20, Knights Templars, of Springfield; A.O.U.W., Wentworth Lodge No. 114, and the Order of Railway Conductors, Ozark Division No. 30, North Springfield. He was one of the charter members, and was a delegate to the national meeting at Buffalo, New York, in October, 1881, and at St. Paul, in October, 1882.

MARION A. FRAME. Mr. Frame was born at Ladoga, Indiana, August 26, 1850. In 1877 he commenced firing upon the St. Louis and San Francisco railway, and December, 1881, was promoted to engineer, and has run an engine on that road ever since. He was married August 22, 1872, to Miss Elvira W. Johnson. Their union has been blest with four children, viz. : Minnie May, Frederick A., Clara B., and Ellen. Mr. Frame is a member of Frisco lodge, B. of L. E. [856]

WILLLIAM T. L. FREEMAN. This gentleman is a son of William T. and Theresa J. (Eldridge) Freeman, and was born at Shreveport, Louisiana, June 12, 1847. His grandfather, John Freeman, was Revolutionary soldier, and one of Washington's scouts. His father died near Stockton, California contributed largely to magazines and other literary publications, but is best known as an authoress, by her book, "Silver Lake; or the Belle of Bayou Louis." After his father's death the family moved to St. Louis, where he was reared and educated. They lived in St. Louis until 1868, and then moved to De Lassus, Mo., and with Col. De Lassus, built the De Lassus hotel. He then returned to St. Louis, where he was engaged in business about three years. He came to North Springfield in August, 1880, and accepted the position of secretary of the master of transportation of the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad Mr. Freeman as married April 28, 1867, to Miss Emma Bourgeat, of Point Coupee, Louisiana, daughter of Dr. Bourgeat, of that place, and grand niece of the Marquis De Lgssus, the last Spanish governor of the Territory of Louisiana, of which Missouri was then a part. Their union was blest with one child, Julius B. De Lassus, born November 7, 1870. Mrs. Free died February 24,1872. Mr. Freeman is president of the North Springfield Literary and Musical Association.

WILLIAM S. GARWOOD. Mr. Garwood was born in Strasburg, Pennsylvania, June 1, 1858. January 23, 1877, he went into an office on the "Frisco" R. R. as messenger boy for the telegraph company for three months, then went to Richland, where he was night operator for eight months. He next spent five months as night operator at Sullivan, after which he returned to North Springfield and was operator for three months in the office of train dispatcher. On August 17, 1879, he was given the office of general baggage agent, which position he holds at this writing. He is an Odd Fellow and belongs to Springfield lodge, No. 218. Mr. Garwood was married October 23, 1880, to Miss Lizzie G. Stone, of Springfield. They have one child, a daughter named Willie, born December 12, 1882.

WILLIAM GEISTER. Mr. Geister was born in Franklin county, Missouri, February 4, 1862. He is a son of Adam and Fredricka Geister, who moved to Springfield, Greene county, Missouri, in 1872, where they lived until 1879, and then moved out upon a farm one mile east of Springfield where they reside at present. In 1875 William went to work in the paint shops of the Frisco railway shops where he worked two years. He then worked in the machine shops eighteen months, and then began firing upon an engine on the St. Louis & San Francisco railway, which position he still holds. He is a member of Frisco lodge, No. 51, Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen, of which he is managing agent.

BENJAMIN GRIST. Mr. Grist was born in Bradford county, Pennsylvania, July 12th, 1833. In 1850 he went to LaSalle county, Illinois, where be was engaged for some years in the nursery business. When he was twenty-two years of age he began railroading. His first work was to pump water with a hand pump on the Illinois Central at Wenona, and then he began braking. In 1855 and 1866 he attended school at Farm Ridge, Ill. He then returned to the Illinois Central and began braking, which he carried on one summer, and was then appointed yard master at Amboy, Ill. He held that position a year, and then returned to Wenona and was elected tax collector for a year. In 1861 he moved Livingston county, Ill., where he farmed two years and then moved to Montgomery county, Ill., and farmed there two years. In 1866 he moved to Jefferson City, Missouri, and began braking upon the Missouri Pacific, and was promoted to conductor in 1866. He ran on that road as conductor until 1869, when he went to the Iron Mountain railroad as conductor, where he remained eight months. He came upon the Frisco road in December, 1869, and ran the first mixed train into North Springfield in May, 1870, and was promoted passenger conductor in April 1871, and is now. Mr. Grist is a member of the Gate of the Temple, Lodge, No. 22, A. F. and A. M., of which he was worshipful master in 1876-7. He is also a member of the Royal Arch Chapter, No. 15, and St. John's Commandery, No. 20. Mr. Grist was married October 6th, 1856, to Amanda Williams, of Tonica, Illinois. They have two children, Maud F. and Susie E. Mr. Grist is president of the school board of North Springfield. [857]

JOSEPH W. HALL. Mr. Hall was born in Southville, Connecticut, January 1st, 1848. In April, 1872, he engaged with a civil engineer corps at Carthage, and assisted in the survey of a route to Halstead, Kansas, on which survey the St. L. & S. F. railway is located. In the following year, he went in the freight office of the railroad at Carthage, Mo., as clerk, and two weeks later was promoted to the position of ticket agent, which place he held till June 24, 1881, when he was transferred to North Springfield, and given charge of the freight and ticket depots. He is now acting in the capacity of freight and ticket agent for that station. On March 30, 1876, Mr. Hall was married to Miss Clara E. Starr, of Carthage, Mo. He is a trustworthy gentleman, and adds one more to the class of citizens that tends to give all towns prestige among strangers.

THOMAS L. HASLER. Mr. Hasler is the son of Eli and Maria Hasler, and was born in Baltimore, July 14th, 1852. His parents came to Missouri in 1858, and are now living upon a farm in Phelps county, Missouri. Thomas L. commenced firing upon an engine on the St. Louis and San Francisco railway in June, 1874, and at the end of four years was promoted to the position of engineer of a locomotive engine, which he now runs upon that road. He is a fine engineer, and enjoys the confidence of all. He was married September 3rd, 1879, to Miss Lucy E. McLean. They have one child, Thomas Allen, born December 5th, 1880. He is a member of Pacific City Division, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, also of the Locomotive Engineers' Life Insurance Association.

ALANSOM M. HASWELL. This gentleman is a grandson of Anthony Haswell, a Revolutionary soldier, who, at the close of that war, started the first paper in Bennington, Vermont, and probably the first in that state. It was called the Vermont Gazette, and Mr.Haswell was its editor and publisher for about thirty-five years. His son, James M. Haswell, D.D., was born in Bennington, Vermont, February 4th, 1810. His father died when he was about seven years of age, and he went to Pennsylvania and learned pharmacy. While in the drug business, he prepared himself for college, and entered Madison University at Hamilton, New York where he graduated in 1835. On the 23rd of August, 1835, he married Miss Jane M. Mason. Soon after his marriage he was appointed by the Baptist church as a missionary to Maulmain, British Burmah. He sailed September 10th, 1835, and arrived there the following January, and remained until his death, on the 25th of September, 1876. His widow and two daughters are yet living in Maulmain. Alansom M. Haswell was born June 29th, 1847, at Maulmain, British Burnish. His father brought him to the United States when he was two years of age, where he remained three years, and then was taken back to Maulmain, and lived with his parents until he was twelve years old. He was then brought back to this country to be educated, receiving his primary education at Boston. He graduated from Hamilton University in 1866. He then engaged in farming two years, and next moved to Springfield, Missouri, where he engaged in surveying and classing railway lands in Southwest Missouri for three years. He then farmed in Greene county until the 8th of June, 1878, when he took charge of the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad land office, at North Springfield, for Dr. E. T. Robberson, the agent. In August, 1879, he went into partnership with E. T. Robberson, and upon Robberson's resignation in 1881, Mr. Haswell and A. H. Sander were appointed joint agents for about one hundred and fifty thousand acres of land belonging to the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad company, which position he still holds, besides doing a general real estate business. March 11th, 1873, he married Miss L. C. Butler, by whom he had five children, three of whom are now living. He and his wife are members of the Congregational church. [858]

FRANCIS A. HEACKER. Mr. Heacker is the son of Joseph and Frederica Heacker, and was born in Prussia, Germany, May 28th, 1843. In 1844 his parents emigrated to the United States, and located at Louisville, Kentucky, where he began learning the cigar-maker's trade, when he was eight years of age and has made it the occupation he has since followed. At the beginning of the civil war he was in St. Louis, where he enlisted in the three months service, at the first call for troops, in company I, 1st Missouri regiment. At the expiration of his term of service he re-enlisted in company K, first Missouri artillery, for three years, and served until August 24,1864. He was at the taking of Camp Jackson, the battles of Wilson's Creek, Fort Henry, Fort Donalson, Shiloh, Corinth, Helena, Little Rock, and upon the Steele campaign. After the war he worked at his trade in different places, and in 1875 engaged in the manufacture of cigars at Springfield. In 1876 he moved his factory to North Springfield, where he is now doing a flourishing business in the wholesale line, employing about fifteen hands. Mr. Heacker was married December 31, 1873, to Miss Martha E. Webb, of Springfield, Missouri. They have two children, Pearle and Francis. Mr. Heacker is justly regarded as one of the substantial men of the county.

WILLIAM H. HEFFERMAN. This gentleman was born in Australia, March 6, 1847, and is the son of Stephen and Margaret Hefferman. His mother is dead and his father now lives in Springfield. William came to America when he was about four years of age. In 1861 he commenced braking upon the Illinois Central railroad, and worked at it about eighteen months. He then went on the C., R. I. & P. R. R., and fired seven years. He then went on the Hannibal & St. Joe road and fired about three months and was promoted to engineer and ran as such about six months. He then went to Minnesota and learned the miller's trade and worked at it four years. In 1871 he came to North Springfield and fired five years, and was then given an engine and has been an engineer upon the Frisco road ever since. Mr. Hefferman was married December 25, 1865, to Miss Catharine Hickey, of Minnesota. Their union has been blest with five children, viz.: Ellen R., John F., Maud, Harry and Lilliard. Mr. Hefferman is a member of Pacific City Division, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.

B. F. HOBART. This gentleman is a native of Yates county, Now York. He came West in 1870 and engaged for some time as a private banker at Oswego, Kansas. July 1, 1882, he moved to Springfield, Mo., and is now the popular vice president of the bank of Springfield.

JOHN HULSE was born in England, September 14th, 1850. When he was one year old his parents brought him to America, remaining one year and then returning to England. In 1866 the subject of this sketch came back to this country, and a few weeks later his parents also came. He lived with them till he was twenty-five years old, then, on the 5th of April, 1875, married Miss Parilee Huff. After his marriage he began farming, and continued till 1879, when he commenced to "fire" on an engine of the Frisco, and is still so engaged. He is the father of two children, named Ethie and Hugh. Mr. Hulse is a member of Frisco Lodge, No. 81, Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen, and is secretary of that lodge.

GEORGE M. HUSTON. Mr. Huston was born in Somerset, Ohio, July 8th, 1849, and is the son of J. E. and Annie Huston. At the age of fourteen he went to Lancaster, Ohio, and entered the shops of the C. & M V. railway where he learned the machinist's trade, working four years. He next went to Columbus, Ohio, and worked in the shops of the P. C. & St. L. railroad, where he remained two years. In the spring of 1872, he come to Missouri, and engaged in the St. Louis and San Francisco shops at North Springfield until 1879, when he commenced firing on a locomotive. He fired a year, and then took an engine, which he has shown himself abundantly able to handle. He is a member of Pacific Division, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, Locomotive Engineers' Mutual Life Association, and the Frisco Locomotive Engineers' Health Association. He was married December 20th, 1880, to Miss Annie Payton, daughter of B. F. and Cordelia Payton, now of Joplin Mo. They have one child, Cordie, born October 16th, 1881. [859]

DR JOHN HYDE. This gentleman is the son of Abijah and Eunice (Green) Hyde, and was born in Trumbull county, Ohio, April 10th, 1836. Here he grow to manhood, was educated at the Western Reserve Ssminary. He taught school from 1855 to 1859, reading medicine in his leisure hours. He completed his medical studies at the Medical Institute, at Baltimore. He practiced for a time in his native county, but in 1868 gave up the practice and began the study of law. He entered the law department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, that year, and graduated in 1864. The same year he commenced the practice of law at Warren, Ohio, and continued until 1868, when he moved to Gainsville, Ozark county, Missouri, where he again took up the practice of medicine. He did a good practice and in 1871 opened a drug store in connection with his profession. In 1875 he added a general stock of merchandise to his store, and he owns the store at present. He gave up medicine then, and in 1871 and 1872 he was county school commissioner of Ozark county. He was prosecuting attorney from 1874 to 1876, and from 1876 to 1880 was county treasurer. All of which offices he filled with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of his constituents. In 1881 he moved to North Springfield, where he is engaged in the fancy dry goods and millinery business. Dr. Hyde was married in 1865 to Miss Amelia E., daughter of Aaron W. and Mary Wood, of Warren, Ohio. They have had four children, only one now living, Nellie E. Dr. Hyde is a member of the Methodist church, and a most worthy citizen.

STEPHEN JACKSON. Mr. Jackson is the son of Edmund and Ann Jackson, and was born in Yorkshire, England, April 17th, 1849. In 1854 his parents came to the United States and located upon Long Island, where his father purchased a third interest in the race course. He went to Kankakee county, Ill., in 1855, where Stephen lived until he was fourteen years of age, and then went to work with the civil engineer corps of the Danville & Great Western R. R., as rodman, and in three years held the position of civil engineer. In 1862 he went to Louisville, Ky., and ran the wrecking train for Gen. Rosencranz to Nashville, until 1863 He then enlisted in company F, 64th Illinois infantry, and was at the battles of Snake Creek Gap, Resaca, Dallas, Big Shanty and Kennesaw Mountain. He was detailed as orderly for Gen. McPherson's staff, and was by the side of that general when he was killed at Atlanta, and himself wounded in the action. He then returned to his regiment and was at the following engagements: Kingston, Savannah, Thunderbolt, Beaufort, Columbia and Bentonville. He then returned home and resumed railroading, working upon several differen roads, the last being conductor upon the construction train on the Iowa division of the Rock Island R. R. from 1870 to 1878. He then engaged in the grain, produce and general merchandise business at Avoca, Iowa, until 1882. He then came to Springfield and laid the track for the People's Street Railway. He is now the proprietor of the North Springfield House, and is one of the best landlords in the Southwest. Mr. Jackson is a member of the I. O. O. F. and A. F. and A. M. He was married March 22, 1869, to Miss Eliza, daughter of Daniel and Eliza Hamer, of Clifton, Ill. They have three children, Arthur B., Bertha S. and Stephen H.

ROBERT JENKIN. Mr. Jenkin was born in Ontario, Canada, January 6th, 1849. His parents died when he was quite young. In 1862 he went to St. Clair, Michigan, and enlisted for the U. S. service, but the officers refused to receive him on account of his youth. He went however with the 8th Michigan cavalry, and stayed through the war. He went to Leavenworth, in 1866, and there learned bricklaying, remaining three years. After working at his trade one year in Texas, he went to Mississippi and engaged in cotton raising two years. In 1872 he came to North Springfield, this county, and followed his trade till 1876. On October 30, 1880 he was married to Miss Mary A. Blankenship, daughter of W. S. Blankenship, by whom he has one child, named Inez Gordon. Mr. Jenkin is one of the leading business men of North Springfield. He owns a brickyard that turns out 750,000 bricks per year, and also operates as a building contractor. He is also book-keeper for the street railway company, looking after their interests generally, and is connected with various other enterprises of the town. He owns a handsome and elegantly furnished brick residence, belonging to which there are six acres of ground. As a citizen of thrift and enterprise, Mr. Jenkin takes front rank, and the style in which he lives bespeaks the social position his family holds. [860]

A. J. KANADA. Mr. Kanada was born in Franklin county, Mo., January 21,1847. He lived upon the farm until the civil war. In 1863 he joined company H, 4th Missouri cavalry, Confederate service, and served until the close of the war. In 1866 he began firing upon the Missouri Pacific railroad, which he continued for a year, and then went to braking. He was promoted to conductor and has been braking and running a train alternately until the last year, since when he has had charge of a regular train. In 1873 he went upon the Iron Mountain R. R. and stayed about a year, and then ran upon the I and St. L. for nine months, and then upon the Salem & Little Rock R. R. for about eight months. He worked for a short time at the yards at Pacific. Mr. Kanada was married June 9, 1876, to Miss Virginia Lavender, a native of Franklin county, Mo. Their union has been blest with five children, three of whom are now living, Charles P., Emma E. and Cora. M.

HERMAN H. KAUFHOLTZ. Mr. Kaufholtz was born in Oldensburg, Germany, February 2, 1832. In 1845 his parents emigrated to the United States and settled at Baltimore, Md., where Herman grew to manhood. In 1853 he went to Galveston, Texas, where he remained a few years and then located at San Antonio, Texas, where he sold groceries until 1870. During the war he was constable at San Antonio. In 1870 he came to North Springfield and engaged in merchandising. He carries a large stock of groceries and does a flourishing business. In 1872 he lost heavily by fire but has since recovered, and is now one of the solid business men of the place. He was a member of the first city council and has filled the office seven years. He was married in 1854 to Miss Elizabeth Banka, of Galveston, Texas. They have five children now living, viz.: Bertha, Henry, Annie W., Lena F. and Ada K.

MICHAEL KEARNEY. Mr. Kearney is a son of Thomas and Ann (Bussing) Kearney. His father was a native of Ireland, and his mother of New York. Michael was born in Providence, Rhode Island, October 8, 1839, and was reared in the State of New York. At the age of sixteen he went to work in the machine shops of the Hudson River Railroad Company, where he worked until the war broke out. He was then employed as a mechanic by the government until the war ceased. He then accepted the position of foreman in the railroad shops at Nashville, Tenn., where he remained two years. Then he filled the same position at Marshall, Texas for the Southern Pacific railroad for over a year. He next went to New Orleans and worked for the New Orleans & Jackson railroad a short time, and in 1870 he came to the St. Louis & San Francisco railroad and was foreman at Pacific City, until the shops were removed to Springfield, and since 1875 has been master mechanic for that road. Mr. Kearney is a self-made man and has fought his way unaided to the lucrative and responsible position he now holds, and enjoys the confidence of the road officials, and all who enjoy his acquaintance. Mr. Kearney was married in 1872 to Miss Mary DeLong, of New Orleans, formerly of the State of New York. [861]

RUFUS H. LACY. Mr. Lacy is the son of John T. and Mary E. Lacy, and was born in Tioga county, New York, March 3rd, 1842. He grew to manhood and was educated in his native county, and upon the breaking out of the civil war, he enlisted August 3rd, 1861, in company, H, 3rd New York regiment, infantry, and served in the army of the Potomac. He was at Fort McHenry in 1862, and at the seige of Vicksburg in 1863. He then veteranized, and re-en- listed in the 50th New York, and served until the end of the war. He was in the battles of the Wilderness, Weldon Railroad, and at Lee's surrender. He then went to Michigan, and returned to New York in 1867 and engaged in farming. In 1877 he came to North Springfield, Missouri and in 1879 embarked in his present business of restaurant and boarding house, where he is now doing a good business. Mr. Lacy is a member of the Temple of Honor, and an active worker in the temperance cause. He was married in 1867 to Miss Mary E. Vangorden, of Tioga county, New York.

FREDERIC W. LAKER. The subject of this sketch was born in Germany, on the 24th day of October, 1844. He is a son of Peter H., who died October 9th, 1873, and Anna M. I., who died August 31st, 1858. When Fred was an infant his parents brought him to America, with whom he lived until November 5th, 1861, then enlisted in company I, 43rd regiment Indiana infantry, and served until June 24th, 1865. After the close of the war, he came to Greene county and engaged in farming until 1873, then commenced firing on an engine on the St. L. and S. F. railway, at which he worked until September 6th, 1878; then was promoted to engineer, and has been running an engine ever since. He is king of Springfield Royal Arch No. 15, and a member of Gate of the Temple No. 425, A. F. and A. M. He is district lecturer for the 30th Masonic district of Missouri, composed of Greene, Webster and Wright counties. He is chief of the North Springfield division of the Oriental Order of the Palm and Shell. He is a member of Pacific City Division No. 83 Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. On the 25th day of December, 1870, Mr. Laker married Miss Madora E. C. Kite. They have a family of five children living.

AUGUST LOHMEYER. This gentleman is the son of Henry and Louisa (Vittenberg) Lohmeyer, and was born in Ahmsen, Kingdom of Lippe Delmold, Germany, March 2, 1846. At the age of fifteen years he learned the cabinet trade. At the breaking out of the Franco-Prussian war he enlisted in the 55th regiment infantry, and served throughout the war. He was at the battles of Varbach, Gravelotte, the seige and battle of Metz, and many smaller engagements. After the war he worked in an organ factory, and in 1872 he came to the United States. He worked at his trade in New York City, until 1876, when he went to Philadelphia, and was foreman in the street car factory of J. S. Brill. In 1877 he, with Wm. Sutton, came to Lebanon, Mo., and carried on contracting and building until 1879. Mr. Lohmeyer then came to North Springfield and worked for the Frisco railroad, as pattern-maker, until the fall of 1882. He then, in partnership with M. F. Sibley, went into the furniture and undertaking business, where they do a fine business, and the firm is one of the best in the city. Mr. Lohmeyer was married in 1870, to Miss Ernestine Klingenberg. Their marriage has been blest with three boys and two girls.

ADDISON LOVE was born in Buffalo, N. Y., September 7, 1857. His parents are Jesse and Margaret Love, who now live in Randolph county, Indiana. At the age of 17, Mr. Love began firing on the western division of the Fort Wayne, Pittsburg and Chicago railroad, and, with the exception of about one year, has been railroading ever since. In Decembor, 1881, be came to North Springfield, and was engaged as fireman on an engine of the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad, where he is still employed. He is an active member of the Frisco lodge, No. 51, B. of L. F., and also of the Locomotive Fireman's Mutual Benefit Association. [862]

JOHN LYDON. Mr. Lydon was born in Warren county, Ohio, August 26, 1853. In 1875 he went upon the St. Louis & San Francisco R. R. as brakeman, and was promoted conductor in 1877. He is a member of Pacific lodge No.122, Ancient Order of United Workmen. Mr. Lydon is one of the reliable and efficient officials of that popular road.

JAMES LYDON. Mr. Lydon was born in Warren, county, Ohio, August 8, 1857. December 12, 1873, he commenced firing upon an engine on the St. Louis & San Francisco R. R. He was promoted engineer August 30, 1879, and has run an engine ever since. He is a member of the Gate of the Temple lodge, No. 422, A. F. and A. M., and also of Wentworth lodge, No. 113. A. O. U. W. and Legion of Select Knights A. O. U. W. Mr. Lydon was married January 21, 1883 to Miss Helen T. Stewart, of North Springfield. Although young in years, he is one of the best engineers upon the road.

WALTER W. MANSFIELD. W. W. Mansfield is a native of Illinois, born in Chemung, McHenry county, on the 18th day of July, 1849. He lived with his parents until June, 1871, then came to Missouri and went to firing on an engine on the St. L. and S. F. railway, where he worked two years, then worked in the railway yard at Vinita, I. T., until June 4th, 1874, then returned to Springfield and married Miss Mirian A. Noyes. They have one child living--Walter Randol, born August 25th, 1878, and one dead--Arthur William, born Nov. 23rd, 1880, died July 16th, 1882. After his marriage he ran a switch engine in the railway yard at North Springfield a few weeks, then went on the road, where he has run an engine ever since. Mr. Mansfield is a member of Gate of the Temple Lodge, No. 422, A. F. and A. M., and also belongs to Pacific City Division, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.

M. F. MARTIN. This gentleman is the son of Parley and Eliza J. (Potter) Martin, and was born in Erie county, N. Y., February 9, 1850. In 1868 his parents moved to Vermillion county, Illinois, where he grew to manhood and was educated. At the age of seventeen he engaged in teaching school, which he followed three years, and then learned the carpenter's trade under his father. He worked at that trade six years, spending one year in Kansas and one in Iowa. In 1878 he came to North Springfield, and worked for J. J. Henkey, lumber merchant. In 1880 he embarked in the lumber business for himself, and is now doing a good business, being regarded as one of the substantial citizens of the city. Mr. Martin was married October 22,1872, to Mrs. Sarah J. Clawson, formerly a Miss Wright, of Vermillion county, Illinois. They have two children, Effie J. and Francis L. Mr. Martin is a member of the I O. O. F.

GEORGE E. McCAULEY. This gentleman is the son of Mathias and Matilda McCauley, and was born in Howard county, Maryland, April 12, 1844. In 1863 he enlisted in company C, 2nd Maryland cavalry. After he returned from the war he went to Baltimore and worked in the machine shops of the Northern Central R. R, where he learned the machinist's trade, working three years. He then worked for the Cumberland & Pennsylvania R. R. at Mount Savage, and in the shops of the Iron Mountain R. R. at St. Louis, and other places. In 1870 he came to Springfield and went to work for the St. Louis & San Francisco R. R., repairing engines in their round-house until 1872, when he was promoted to round-house foreman, or engine dispatcher, and he now has charge of the company's large round-house. Mr. McCauley was married Dec. 18, 1872, to Miss Susan E., daughter of H. S. and Clara Blankenship, of Springfield. Their union has been blest with four children, viz.: William Robert, George, Eugene, Clara Matilda and Edwin Mathias, deceased. Mr. McCauley is an agreeable, genial gentleman, and by his faithful discharge of responsible duty, enjoys the confidence of the railway officials and he fully merits the trust committed to his care. [863]

THOMAS B. McLEAN. Mr. McLean is a native of England, born Dec. 6th, 1848. His parents and their family came to America in 1850, and settled in Paterson, N. J. At the age of fourteen, the subject of this sketch went into the machine shops of the Iron Mountain R. R. at South St. Louis, to learn the machinist trade. He worked in those shops three years, then went to firing on an engine on the I. M. R. R. and fired four years; from there he went to the Texas Pacific and fired one year, then returned to the I. M. R. R., and fired until July, 1871, then was given an engine which he ran on that road six years. In July, 1877, he took an engine on the St. L. & S. F. railway, where he is running at present. Sept. 16th, 1872, he married Miss Annie E. Hewitt, of St. Louis. They have one child, Alice M., born Oct. 24th, 1873. He is a member of Gateway Lodge, No. 110, A. F. and A. M., at Frederick, Mo. He belongs to Pacific City Division, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. He is the president of the Frisco Locomotive Engineer Health Association, and a member of the Locomotive Engineer Mutual Insurance Association.

CYRUS J. McMASTER. This gentleman is the son of Dr. Edwin K. and Eliza J. (Bull) McMaster, and was born in Dade county, Missouri, May 18, 1847. His parents were natives of North Carolina, and were among the pioneer settlers of Dade county. In 1851 his parents moved to Greens county where Cyrus grew to manhood. In l864 he enlisted in the 14th Missouri cavalry and served until the war closed. During 1869-70 be carried on the saddle and harness business at Walnut Grove. In 1871 he came to North Springfield, and engaged in the produce and commission business. In 1880 he entered into partnership with Geo. O. Vick, and they have-since done a thriving business in produce and grain shipments, handling about a quarter of a million dollars worth of grain in l882. They are one of the best firms in the city and deserve the success they enjoy. Mr. McMaster was married November 17, 1868, to Miss Isabel Weir, daughter of James and Fidelia Weir, of this county. Their union has been blest with two children.

HARRY P. MERRITT. Mr. Merritt was born in Detroit, Michigan, June 12th, 1859. In March, 1873, he began learning the machinists trade in the shops of the St. Louis and Son Francisco railway, at North Springfield and served an apprenticeship of three years. He then worked in the shops a year after he learned the trade. He then began firing upon an engine, and on the 8th of October, 1880, he was promoted to engineer, and has been running an engine ever since. He is a member of Pacific City Division, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.

M. R. MILLER. This gentleman was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, February 26TH, 1850. In 1869 he commenced braking upon the A. & G. R. R., and braked about eighteen months, when he was promoted to conductor, and ran a train until November 24th, 1880. He then came to North Springfield, Mo., and on December 12th, 1880, began braking upon the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad, and upon February 2nd, 1881, he was again promoted conductor, and is now running a train. Mr. Miller is a member of Springfield Chapter of Royal Arch Masons.[864]

MATHIAS G. MOIST. Mr. Moist was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, February 8th, 1843. In 1866 he began railroading, and was with the civil engineering corps on the Union and Logansport railroad. Subsequently, he was with the corps on the North Missouri railroad (now Wabash) survey. He came to North Springfield in 1868, and worked with the engineering corps after the St. Louis and San Francisco road was completed. Ho was chief of the corps on the Kansas branch of Frisco. In 1869, he was appointed wood and stock agent of the Frisco, which he holds at this writing. Mr. Moist was married in l871, to Miss Annie L. McCarty. They have three children. He belongs to Hope Council, No. 5, R. T. of T.

JOHN MONAGHAN. Mr. Monaghan was born in Rochester, New York, June 26th, 1845, and is the son of Lawrence and Margaret (Sulvoy) Monaghan. His parents emigrated to Michigan in 1849. At the age of 16 John began farming for himself, and followed the business for four years. He then went to Jackson, Michigan, and there fired upon a stationary engine for a few months, and was then employed as engineer, and ran the engine for five years. In 1869 he went to Lebanon, Mo., and worked in the bridge department of the St. L. & S. F. R. R for six months. He then came to North Springfield and commenced work in the round house at wiping engines. After a few months he began firing upon an engine and in June, 1877 was promoted engineer, and he has been so ever since. By industry and economy he has saved quite a competence, and owns two nice dwellings in North Springfield. In the fall of 1869, he married Mrs. Margaret Riley, of Lebanon, Mo. They have four children, William, Nona, John and Ella. Mr. Monaghan is a member of Wentworth Lodge, No. 113, A. O. U. W., and of Pacific City Division, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, of which he is Guide.

JOSEPH R. MOORE. Mr. Moore is the son of James and Mary Moore, and was born at Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, March 20,1840. His parents came to Missouri in 1858 and settled in Miller county, and remained until 1861, when, on account of the war, they removed to Franklin county. Joseph R. Moore learned the machinist's trade at Susquehanna, Penn., in the celebrated Erie railway shops. He then farmed for three years, and in 1861 enlisted in Captain W. D. Bowen's company, Missouri volunteers. He was wounded in the left leg at the battle of Wilson's Creek, and was therefore discharged. He returned to Susquehanna and as soon as he was able, he again went to work in the Erie shops in the fall of 1861, and continued there until 1867. He then returned to Missouri, and ran an engine on the St. Louis & San Francisco railway. He now runs a passenger engine between Springfield and Pacific. Mr. Moore was married on the 21st of October, 1869, to Miss Del, S. Tallcott, of Belleville, New York. He is chief engineer of Pacific Lodge, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, also a member of Wentworth Lodge, No. 113, A. O. U. W.

JOHN H. MOORE is a native of Giles county, Tennessee, born August 2, 1829. His parents were John and Elizabeth Moore, the latter of whom died in Tennessee in May, 1838. In November, 1840, his father and the rest of the family came and settled in Pulaski (now Webster) county, Missouri, where they lived three years, then moved into Greene county, locating on a farm just east of Springfield. Three years later they moved to Stone county, where the father died, and where John H. afterwards served as county judge. At twenty-two years old, the subject of this sketch began learning the carpenter's trade in Arkansas, at which he worked, off and on, till the fall of 1865. He then went to Cassville, in Barry county, where he engaged in the dry goods business for a year. In 1866 he was elected sheriff, and re-elected in 1868. In 1870 was elected county treasurer, and at the expiration of his term, moved to Verona, Lawrence county, Missouri, and engaged in the hotel business. Mr. Moore came to North Springfield in May, 1874, and has held several city offices since, being at this writing, mayor of the city. During the civil war, Mr. Moore served as a lieutenant in the Home Guards of Stone county, and in 1862 was enrolled in company K, 72nd regiment, E. M. M. and served as captain for about a year. He was then detailed as captain of a company in the 7th provisional regiment, M. S. M. and served till November, 1864. Subsequently, he joined the 15th Missouri cavalry, and was finally mustered out in August, 1865. On September 25, 1853, he married Emeline Melton, of Stone county. They have four children living--William B., John E., Eliza C., and Jeptha O. They have lost five children. Mr. Moore is a member of the Temple of Honor and R. T. of T. He is an upright, trustworthy citizen, and has a strong hold on the good will of North Springfield citizens. [865]

DAVID E. MORROW, D. D. S. Dr. Morrow is the son of James K. and M. E. Morrow, and was born in Wayne county, Ohio, March 25, 1856. In 1865 his parents moved to Cass county, Missouri, where he grow to manhood upon a farm, and was educated at the State Normal School at Warrensburg. He began teaching school at the age of seventeen and taught until he was twenty-two. He had to depend upon himself to get his professional education. In 1878 he commenced the study of dentistry with Dr. M. V. Johnson, of Holden, Missouri, one of the leading dentists of Western Missouri. He remained with him until 1880, and then took the course of dentistry at the St. Louis Dental College. He then located at Harrisonville, Missouri, where he practiced until December, 1882, and then located at North Springfield, where he is doing a fine business and is making a reputation in his profession. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, and is a young man of fine promise.

JOHN W. NELSON was born in Montreal, Canada, March 19,1842. His parents were William and Martha Nelson, the former being still alive and residing in Ray county, Missouri, though the latter died in 1856. He was but five months old when his parents came to Missouri, and located in Ray county,--besides the father--four brothers and two sisters still reside. He began "firing" on the H. & St. Joe R. R. in 1859, continuing till 1861, when he enlisted for the war in company E, 13th Mo. infantry, serving therein till captured by Gen. Price at Lexington. Being paroled, he remained at home till his exchange in January, 1862, then entered the 3rd Mo. cavalry as sergeant, and marched from Chillicothe to Pea Ridge, via Springfield, participating in the battles of both those places and at Prairie Grove. In May 1864, he re-enlisted in the 13th Mo. and served till mustered out at Leavenworth, Kansas. Going then to Rolla, Mo. He began working for the St. L. & S. F. R. R. company, and was brakeman on the first regular freight that ran to Lebanon. In 1870 he began "firing" on the same road, and in 1874 was given charge of an engine, since which time he has served steadily as engineer. Mr. Nelson was married October 15, 1866, to Elizabeth Charles, by whom he has had four children, two of whom are still living. He is a member of the Springfield lodge No. 218, I. O. O. F., the Temple of Honor, and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.

DANTON H. NICHOLS. Mr. Nichols has the reputation of being one of the most popular officials of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway Company. Thrown upon his own resources at the age of seventeen, with a fair education, having attended the Illinois military academy two and a half years previous, he came to Missouri and engaged in braking on a freight train, and has since hold various positions on the St. Louis and San Francisco railway, which he filled satisfactorily for the company, and thereby gained their confidence and respect, which induced them to appoint him superintendent of the A. and P. division of the road in 1875, and in 1881, promoted him to master of transportation, which position he holds at present.. He is the son of Mathias R. and Sylvia S. Nichols, born in Allen county, Ohio, August 14, 1849. On the 8th day of September, 1874, he married Miss Katie Cummings, daughter of Daniel and Mary Cummings of St. Louis. They have three children: Mamie, Sophia, and Danton. Mr. Nichols belongs to St. John's commandery, No. 20, Knights Templar. He is also past master of Wentworth lodge, No. 113, A. O. U. W. Socially, Mr. Nichols is an affable and agreeable companion. His motto, to which he has rigidly adhered in business, is to do that which his sense of right demands, leaving the consequences to take care of themselves. [866]

WALTER A. NOLEMAN. Mr. Noleman was born May 25th, 1848 in Jefferson county, Illinois. In 1868 he commenced firing on an engine on the Illinois Central railroad, and worked at it four years. He then ran a switch engine in the yards at Centralia, Illinois, several months. He then removed to Stone county, Missouri, and engaged in sheep raising for two years. He next went to firing upon the St. L. and S. F. railway, and was promoted engineer upon that celebrated road, and is now running an engine. Mr. Noleman was married to Miss Elizabeth M. Thompson, of Centralia, Illinois. Their union has been blest with one daughter, Sarah Ann. Mr. Noleman is a member of Frisco Lodge, Division No. 5, Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen.

WILLIAM PALMER. Mr. Palmer was born in Boone county, Missouri, May 16th, 1848, and is a son of James W. and Sarah Palmer, who now reside at North Springfield. In 1869 William began firing on an engine upon the I and St. L. railroad, but in a few months went on the O. and M. railroad, and fired four years. He was then promoted engineer, and ran a train several months. Then he went back to the I and St. L. railroad, and ran an engine until 1875, when he came back to North Springfield. July 6th, 1875, he went to work for the St. L. and S. F. railroad, and was soon given an engine, which he ran until November 5th, 1882. He is now running an engine on the K. C. S. and M. railroad. Mr. Palmer was married July 19th, 1875 to Miss Mary A. Foltz. Their union has been blest with two children, Nettie and John.

RODOLPHUS G. PARKER. Mr. Parker is the son of Joseph and Catherine (Adams) Parker, who were natives of Maine. His ancestors upon his mother's side, the Stillsons, were the original settlers of Deer Island, now a noted summer resort upon the shore of Maine. R. G. Parker was born in Hancock county, Maine, January 21, 1830. In 1845 his parents moved to Ottawa county, Ohio, where he grew to manhood, and was educated at the common schools and at Oberlin College. In l853 he graduated at Bryant & Stratton's commercial college, Cleveland, Ohio. His father was a ship carpenter, and R. G. began learning it as soon as large enough to handle tools, and has followed the trade most of the time since. He taught school for a short time when a young man. In 1855 he went to Kankakee, Ill., where he was foreman upon the first store building put up in the place. In 1857 he took up a claim in Dakota county, Nebraska, where he worked at his trade until 1859, when he went to St. Joseph, Mo., and in 1860 went to Pike's Peak freighting. He returned to Ottawa, Ohio in the fall of that year. In 1865 he moved to Odell, Ill., where he remained until 1870 contracting and building, also owning a half interest in a boot and shoe store. In 1870 he came to Springfield, and worked at bridge building for the Frisco road, and has been with them ever since, save two years. He is now shipping clerk in the bridge department. Mr. Parker was married December 27, 1860, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Barzilla and Elizabeth Dean, of Ottawa county, Ohio. She died at Rolla, Mo., in 1872. They had six children, three of whom died in 1872 with diphtheria, within eleven days. Those living are Talba C., Frank B., and Clara J. Mr. Parker married the second time, October 22, 1876, to Mrs. Susan C. Hardin, formerly a Miss McBride, of Tennessee. Her parents were neighbors and friends of Andrew Johnson, who made her father's wedding coat. [867]

LEONARD B. PERKINS. Mr. Perkins was born in Parishville, St. Lawrence county, New York, March 12, 1840 his father bearing the Christian name of Cyrus G., and his mother, Martha A. He remained at home and attended school until he was fourteen years old, then went to Lowell, Massachusetts, and worked in a cotton factory for a year or two. Returning home, he learned the painter's trade, serving an apprenticeship of three years, following that vocation till the commencement of the war. He enlisted for U. S. service in April, 1861, going to Albany, where he was sworn in for three months. He next enlisted in the 6th New York infantry for two years, which period he served out, participating in all battles in which his regiment was engaged. After returning home, he married Miss Emma L. Dervey, on June 4, 1863. Three children have been born to them of this union, one only of whom survives at this writing. After his marriage he lived six months in Washington City, going thence to Alexandria, Virginia, where he remained three years. Subsequent to this he was in Baltimore, and his native county, Iowa, Woodstock, and Muscatine, in which latter place he had charge, of the largest creamery in the world. He next went to Kansas, where he remained a short time, coming to North Springfield, this county, in June, 1880. Here he opened a restaurant, and in the spring of 1882, erected his brick house. He is a member of St. Mark's lodge, No. 63, A. P. and A. M., and also of Independence lodge, No. 77, I O. O. F., Baltimore, Maryland.

ISAAC PRICE. Mr. Price is a son of William and Matilda Price, and was born in Grundy county, Tennessee, September 17,1849. In 1858, his parents moved to Rockport Arkansas. His father dying there, he and his mother moved to St. Louis, Missouri, in 1862. In 1863, when he was but fourteen years of age, he enlisted in company M 2nd Missouri artillery, and served until the end of the war. In the winter of 1865 he was put into the cavalry and sent to the plains, where he fought Indians in many skirmishes. After the war he went to work in the Pacific Flour Mills, St. Louis, and then worked a while for the Missouri Pacific railroad. In 1872 he commenced working for the St. Louis and San Francisco railway, and has now been foreman of the paint shops of that road for eight years. Mr. Price is a member of the A. O. U. W., and is a Select Knight. He is a self-made man, having been left fatherless when he was twelve years of age. He was married in 1872 to Miss Margaret, daughter of Thomas and Mary Mangan, natives of Ireland. Their union has been blest with six children, five of whom are living.

GEORGE PRICE. Mr. Price was born in Grundy county, Tennessee, July 1, 1844. He came to Missouri in 1861, and soon after his arrival he enlisted in the 2nd Missouri artillery and served until the close of the war. In 1866 he commenced upon an engine on the Missouri Pacific railroad, and worked upon that road until 1870. He then came on the St. L. & S. F. R. R. and fired until 1876, when he was promoted to engineer and has been running as such ever since. July 4, 1869 he was married to Miss Mary A. Maugan, of Jefferson county, Missouri. Their union has been blest with three children, viz.: Mary A., Matilda J. and Eunice V. Mr. Price is a member of the following benevolent societies: Springfield Lodge, No. 218, I. O. O. F. Pacific Division No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, and of the Locomotive Engineers Mutual Life Insurance Association.

WILLIAM T. PRIGMORE. This gentleman is a Missourian, born in Jasper county, March 15, 1854. He is a son of Dr. L. Prigmore, who resides at Rolla, Missouri, and his mother is also still living. In 1871 he began "braking" on the St. L & S. F R. R. and has been in the employ of the same road, off and on, ever since. July 29, 1879, he was promoted to the position of freight conductor which he has held ever since. Mr. Prigmore was married June 18, 1877, to Miss Norah S. Robberson, of Dixon, Missouri. He is a Free Mason, and a member of Arlington Lodge, No. 346, A. F. & A. M., at Dixon. [868]

THOMAS E. QUICKSELL was born in Montezuma, New York, August 8, 1834. When fourteen years old he began working at a saw mill, at which he continued four years. He next went on a farm and remained till July, 1862, when he joined company C, of the 74th Indiana volunteer infantry, serving in the civil war till July, 1865. He had been in the battles of Stone River, Munfordsville, Mission Ridge, and several other fights and skirmishes, and was once captured at the battle of Munfordsville. He was exchanged, however, and finally mustered out at Camp Norton, Indianapolis. After the war, he began "firing" on the Pittsburg, Ft. Wayne & Chicago R. R., where he fired till 1871, then was put in charge of an engine, which he ran until 1876. He then ran twenty months on the Michigan Central, after which he came to North Springfield, and in April, 1879, took an engine which he is now running. He has been twice married. First in l859, to Angeline Sult (who died in l861), by whom he has one child. On July 4, 1869, he married Mrs. Mary E. Hill, by which marriage he has four children. Mr. Quicksell is a member of the Odd Follows Order at Ft. Wayne, and also belongs to the A. O. U. W.

HENRY T. RAND. Mr. Rand is a son of John H. and Irene (Trumbull) Rand, and was born at Manchester, New Hampshire, November 4, 1848. He grew to manhood in his native town, and in 1865 entered Dartmouth College, from which he graduated in 1869. The same year he accepted a position as civil engineer upon St. Louis & San Francisco railroad, and remained in the offices at St. Louis a year. He then engaged in merchandising at Pacific City, being post master and city clerk. In 1873 he located at North Springfield where he has since been engaged in the grocery business, doing a business of twenty thousand dollars a year. He is the present secretary of the school board. Mr. Rand was married April 30, 1871, to Miss Sarah O., daughter of William C. Inks, of St. Louis county, Missouri. They have four children, Florence J., Willie M., Harry T., and Walter H. Mr. Rand is a member and trustee of the Congregational church.

THOMAS RATHBONE. This gentleman is the son of John and Sarah Rathbone, and was born in England, July 19, 1827. At the age of thirteen, he was apprenticed for seven years to learn the tinner's trade. After completing his trade he worked at it in his native town until 1852, when he came to the United States and located at Williamsburg, N. Y., where he worked at his trade. In 1858 he moved to Springfield, Mo., where he worked at his trade and farmed until 1875. He then went into the stove, hardware, and tinware business, doing the leading business in the place, carrying a large stock, and is one of the best practical tinners in the Southwest During the war he served in the Home Guards, and was in the fight against Gen. Marmaduke. He and his teams were pressed into service when Fremont retreated to Sedalia, and had many narrow escapes upon his return. He is a member of the Temple of Honor, No. 23, find has filled the various offices connected with it. He was married in 1847, to Miss Sarah Warr, of his native town. Their union has been blest with four sons and one daughter. Mr. Rathbone is one of the best citizens of the county, and enjoys the friendship of a large circle of acquaintances.

RICHARD F. RAWDON. Mr. Rawdon was born in Warren, Ohio, August 29, 1845. At the age of sixteen he commenced railroading, doing his first work at braking upon the Atlantic and Great Western railroad in Ohio, which he followed about six years. In 1869 he came West and braked on the Frisco road for six months, and then went with the engineer corps, and was on the survey from Pierce City to the Arkansas river in the Indian Territory. He then went to St. Louis and braked upon the Missouri Pacific road for six months, and was then promoted conductor, and ran a train five years. When the Missouri, Pacific and Frisco separated, he came on the latter road, and has been running a train ever since. For the last two years has been running a passenger train, and is considered one of the most reliable upon the road. Mr. Rawdon was married to Miss Kate Griffith, of Cincinnati, Ohio. Their union is blest with three children, viz.: George, Alice, and Charles. [869]

BENJAMIN J. ROBERTSON. This gentleman was born in Greenecastle, Indiana, February 13, 1844. At seventeen years of age he joined company G, 63rd Illinois volunteer infantry, and served one year as second sergeant. He was then promoted to quartermaster sergeant. In 1863 he was advanced to rank of first lieutenant and regimental quartermaster, which he held till the close of the war. He served through the siege of Vicksburg, also at Black River, Champion Hill, Chattanooga, the campaign before Atlanta and Sherman's march to the sea. He returned to Illinois after the war, and was employed over two years in the office of the Illinois Central railroad at Tuscola. Next he was engaged in the American express company's office at Mattoon. A year later he began braking on the C. & A. R. R., and continued nine months, when he was made freight conductor, and ran a train five months. The machine shops at Bloomington were his next field of a labor, where he remained three years. In September, 1879, he went to Pierce City and began braking on the Kansas division of the "Frisco" line. He was again given charge of a train in May, 1881, which he has conducted since then. His removal to North Springfield was in 1880, where his family now reside. Mr. Robertson was married March 30th, 1868, to Miss Mattie Blake, of Charleston, Illinois, and has at this writing a family of four children.

J. CHRIS. RULE. John Christopher Rule is the son of Raymundes and S. J. Rule, and was born in Baltimore, Md., November 20th, 1844. In the fall of 1866, Mr. Rule came to Springfield, Mo., and opened a saloon, where he remained until 1872. In May, 1875, he opened a saloon on Commercial street in North Springfield, where he is still doing business. He was married June 9th, 1869, to Miss C. W. Heffernan. Their union has been blest with seven children, six of whom are now living.

VALENTINE SCHULLER. The subject of this sketch was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, February 20, 1852. He began "braking" on the Frisco in 1874, and was advanced to a conductorship on October 4, 1878, and has been running a train ever since. Mr. Schuller belongs to Ozark Division, No. 30, O. R. C. Nov. 26, 1879, he was married to Miss Alla D. Lawson, by whom he has one child, a son, named Verner, born October 15, 1882.

FRANK M. SIBLEY. Mr. Sibley is the son of Moses and Mary C. (Cole),Sibley, and was born at Sutton, Worcester county, Mass., Nov. 5, 1850. He grew to manhood and was educated in his native town. In 1870 he went to Hannibal, Missouri, where he was employed in the motive power department of the Hannibal and St. Joe R. R., which position he hold until 1873. He then went to St. Louis and was clerk in the same department of the St. Louis and San Francisco R. R. until 1876. Then he was transferred to Springfield, Missouri, where he held that position until 1882. Then Mr. Sibley went into the furniture and undertaking business with Mr. Lohmeyer, the firm being Lohmeyer & Sibley. They do a flourishing business at North Springfield. Mr. Sibley was married in 1877, to Miss Jennie M., daughter of Washington and Jennie C. Barnharst. Their union has been blest with two children, Frank C. B. and Nellie C. Mrs. Barnharst is postmistress at North Springfield. [870]

BENJAMIN SMITH. This gentleman is the oldest engineer on the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad, having run the first engine on that line. He was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut February 26, 1827. When he was sixteen years old he went into the machine shops of the Housatonic railroad in his native town, and commenced learning the trade of a machinist. Two years later, after firing for a short time on the same road, he took charge of an engine, which he ran at intervals for three years, then regularly, for six successive years. He then ran as engineer on the Rock Island railroad for two years, going thence to St. Louis, where he took charge of an engine on the Missouri Pacific till 1862. Going to Memphis, he ran on the Memphis and Charleston road nine months, for the government, after which he was transferred to Nashville, Tenn., and given charge of an engine of the hospital train, which he ran on various roads in the South till the war closed, visiting several battlefields, among which were Mission Ridge, and the battle between Nashville and Decatur. After the war he returned to Pacific City, Missouri, and took the engine he had formerly run, and has been in same employ ever since. Mr. Smith was married to Martha Tyman some nine years before the civil war, by whom he has had seven children. His home is in Pacific City, where he has lived for thirty years. He is a member of Pacific division, No. 83, B. of L. E., of which order he was a charter member. Besides this he is in the Locomotive Engineers' Mutual Life Insurance Association, and is also a member of the Frisco L. E. H. Association.

GEORGE B. SMITH is a native of Canada, born in Quebec, May 10, 1846. He came to the United States in 1864, and accepted a position on the Chicago and Northwestern railroad, where he stayed three years, then took a train on the Union Pacific railroad, which he run until 1870, then resigned and took a train on the St Louis and San Francisco railway, where he is at present running a passenger train. On the 8th day of November, 1876, he married Miss Florence Britton, a native of New York. They have one child, Clarence Osman Smith. Mr. Smith is a member of Ozark division, No. 30, Order of Railway Conductors.

JAMES W. SPENCER. Mr. Spencer was born in Crawford county Missouri, May 6th, 1847. At the age of seventeen he began braking upon the Ohio and Mississippi railroad, and followed it for ten month. February 4th, 1865, he enlisted in company D, 154th Illinois volunteers infantry, and was mustered out at Springfield, Ill., Sept. 22nd, 1865. He then returned home and learned the carpenter's trade, and came upon the St. Louis and San Francisco railway May 23rd, 1871, and has ever since been engaged in the bridge and building department of that road. Mr. Spencer was married May 31, 1876, to Miss Julia J. Tutan, of Tallahassee, Florida. Their union has been blest with one child, Mabel Estelle, born April 2, 1877. Mr. Spencer is a member of Springfield Lodge, No. 218, I. O. O. F.

HENRY C. SPRAGUE. Mr. Sprague is a Bostonian, and was born at the "Hubb" November 21, 1835. He is of English descent, his parents being Thomas and Elizabeth A. Sprague. At the age of thirteen, he enlisted as a private soldier in the U. S. service, and became drummer boy in the martial band. He was in the service two years, when he returned home and then attended school for some time. On quitting school he learned the trade of pattern-making and machine building at Mount Vernon, Ohio, continuing there four years. Going thence to Iowa City, he remained eighteen months, then went to Monroe, Wisconsin, where he remained a year. Shortly after this he went on the Illinois Central railroad, and after "firing" awhile, was given on engine which he ran for some five years. In 1867, he made a trip to Jacksonville, Florida, where he put machinery in a mill. From Jacksonville he went to Alton, Illinois, and worked in the machine shops for four years, during which time he was captain of a fire company. On coming to North Springfield, Mr. Sprague began working with the bridge and building department of the Frisco road, and is at this writing foreman of the same. He was married March 10, 1854, to Miss Charlotte B. Truesdell, a native of Canada, born March 12, 1835. Mr. and Mrs. Sprague have four children, named Ada A., Ida I., George Bliss, and Anna C. E. Sprague. George B. was born June 3, 1858, while the family was living in Iowa City. He has been, like his father, connected with the Frisco railroad for several years, and is at this time conductor of a train on that line. Henry C. Sprague is a member of the Gate of the Temple lodge, No. 422, A. F. and A. M., and also of the Springfield Royal Arch Chapter, No. 15. [871]

H. C. SPRINKLE. Mr. Sprinkle is the son of William D. and Leah Sprinkle, and was born in North Carolina, November 4, 1854. When he was about four years of age, his parents moved to Cedar county, Missouri, where they lived two years and then removed to Sullivan, Missouri. Jannary 1, 1871, he began braking upon a train on the St. Louis &San Francisco railroad, and in 1874 was promoted to conductor, and has been running a passenger train for two years. Mr. Sprinkle was married June 13, 1877, to Miss Belle Robberson of Dixon, Missouri. Their union is blest with two children, viz.: Curtis H., born March 10, 1878, and Walter, born November 17, 1882. Mr. Sprinkle is a member of St. Louis Division No. 3, Order of Railway Conductors, Sullivan lodge, No. 69, A. F. and A. M., and Rolla Chapter, No. 32.

DOUGLAS STEVENSON. Mr. Stevenson was born at Branford Canada, January 20, 1855. He went to Buffalo, New York, when he was eleven years of age, where he remained five years. He then learned the tinner's trade at Seaforth, Canada. He came to Missouri in the fall of 1872, and began firing upon an engine, and in the fall of 1877 he was promoted to engineer, and has been running an engine upon the St. Louis and San Francisco railway ever since. He was married in 1876, and has three children, viz.: Nellie, James and Douglas. Mr. Stevenson is a member of the Gate of the Temple Lodge, No. 422, A. F. and A. M., and also of Pacific City Division, No. 83, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.

JOHN W. STEWART. This gentleman is the son of A. D. and Mary C. Stewart, and was born in Grant county, Kentucky, June 8th, 1859. In 1876 he commenced braking upon the St. L. and S. F. railway, and upon the 26th of February, 1880, he was promoted to conductor, and has run a train ever since. Mr. Stewart was married September 11th 1881, to Miss Emma Knight, of North Springfield. Their union has been blest with one child, born January 31st, 1883. Mr. Stewart is a member of Ozark Division, No. 30, Order of Railway Conductors.

JAMES A. STOUGHTON. Mr. Stoughton was born in Charleston, Vermont, May 25, 1837. When he was twenty years of age he went to Western Texas and engaged in the cattle business for eight years. He then came to Springfield in 1867, and has been living in North Springfield since 1870. He was married January 15, 1875 to Miss Lizzie Adams. This union has been blest with three children, viz.: Frank K., Minnie and Benjamin W. Mr. Stoughton is director of the bank, superintendent of the street railway company, of which he is one-third owner, and proprietor of the large brick stable of North Springfield.. He is one of the most energetic, enterprising men of the city, and is at present in charge of the "Frisco" stockyards. [872]

WILLIAM A. THOMS. Few men of the day have been more uniformly successful, or had their business qualifications more generally acknowledged than Mr. William A. Thoms. He is a native of Ypsilanti, Michigan, born December 28th, 1848. At the age of nineteen, he began learning telegraphy, in the office of the Michigan Central railroad, in his native town, in which he spent one year. He then engaged in farming, but only continued about a year and a half, when he concluded that the theory of farming was good, but to make it a success required a great deal of hard labor, and that it was too slow a business for an ambitious young man. Going to Indianapolis, he accepted a position as operator in the office of the C. C. C. and I. railroad, and from then until 1872 was constantly employed in Indiana and Illinois, part of the time as train dispatcher. In February, 1872, he came to North Springfield and accepted the position of train dispatcher on the St L. and S. F. railroad, and five years later was appointed station agent. On the 11th of November, 1879, he was promoted to the position of superintendent of the Kansas division, holding this until 1881, when he was transferred to the Missouri and Arkansas divisions, which he has charge of at this writing. On November 6th, 1877, Mr. Thoms was married to Miss Ella Evans, of Springfield. He is a member of St. John's Commandery No. 20, Knights Templar, and also of the A. O. U. W. Still young, in perfect health and the vigor of manhood, having a large and varied experience in railroading, his future promises to be as useful as his past has been active and successful.

JOHN T. THOMS. Mr. Thoms was born in Ypsilanti, Michigan, February 1st , 1855. February 23rd 1880, he commenced firing on an engine upon the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad, and January 1st, 1888, was promoted to engineer, and is now running an engine. Mr. Thoms is a member of the Good Templars Lodge and Congregational church of North Springfield.

GRANVILLE W. TURNER. This gentleman was born in Edina, Knox county, Missouri, January 3, 1844. He is the son of Granville D. and Maria Turner. In 1861 he enlisted in the Federal army and served about nine months. He next engaged in bridge building on the St. Louis and San Francisco railroad, whose western terminus was at that time at Rolla. He has been a resident of North Springfield for three years. He is now master of bridge builders, and fills the position with credit to himself and safety to the road. He was married on June 30, 1880 in South St. Louis, to Miss Melissa Trower. This union has been blest with one child, viz.: Walter, born September 9, 1881.

JOHN R. WENTWORTH. The subject of this sketch was born August 10, 1847, in Dover, New Hampshire. He received a good practical education in his native town. When he was sixteen he went to Boston, Massachusetts and engaged as a clerk in the large shipping and commission house of Pierce & Bacon, where he worked until 1868, then came to Missouri and joined the civil engineer corps that located the present St. L. & S. F. railway. When the road was completed to Marshfield he was appointed freight and ticket agent at that place where he remained until 1873, then was transferred to the office in North Springfield. On the first day of June, 1881, he was promoted to superintendent of the Kansas division of the St. L. & S. F. railway, which position he holds at present. On the 16th day of October, 1870 he married Miss Ida L. Straw, daughter of Col. J. W. & Lucy Straw, of Marsheld. They have one child, Maud E., born May 27,1873. He is a member of Star lodge, No. 20, K. of P., also belongs to Wentworth lodge, No. 113, A. O. U. W.

JOHN T. WILLIAMS. Mr. Williams was born in Marion, Ohio, March 25, 1845. At sixteen years old he was appointed ticket and freight agent on the Missouri Pacific R. R. at Allenton, Mo., and has been in the employ of same road ever since, the St. L. & S. F. R. R. being then under same management as Mo. Pacific. He remained at Allenton two years, when he was transferred to the general freight office at St. Louis. In 1876 he came to North Springfield and his present engagement is that of book-keeper for the bridge-building, and fuel departments of the road. He is also city clerk of North Springfield, and has held that position ever since the city received its charter. November 5, 1866, he married Miss Elomise Desmoulin of St. Louis. They have three living children--Maud B., Walter J., and an unnamed infant. [873]

J. F. UTTER. Mr. Utter is a son of Joseph G. and Rebecca Utter, and was born in Morrow county, Ohio, April 1st, 1858. He began braking upon the St. Louis & San Francisco railroad upon the 8th of September, 1881, and has been so employed ever since, with the exception of one month in the fall of 1882, when he took a "lay off," and made a pleasure trip West. He went to Deming, N.M., Chihuahua, Old Mexico, and San Francisco. He returned via Central Pacific R. R., stopping off at Reno, Nev., and Ogden, Utah. He then took the Union Pacific to Cheyenne, then to Denver, thence to Halstead. Kansas, and then to North Springfield. He is a member of Lodge No. 113, I O. O. F., at Granby, Mo., and North Star Lodge, I O. G. T.

H. S. WARNER. Mr. Warner is a native of Ohio, and has been railroading about six years, and on the Frisco road for four years. He is at present car accountant. [874]


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