History of Greene County, Missouri
1883

R. I. Holcombe, Editing Historian


Chapter 33
Campbell Township
Position and Description--Early Settlers and Settlements
Miscellaneous Historical Items--The "Firsts"--Early Mills--Other Items--A Mysterious Murder--A Tragedy of the Civil War--Washington Forest Church--Union Congregational Church--Antioch Church and Cemetery--Hazel Dell Sunday School--Biographies of Old Settlers and Prominent Citizens of Campbell Township


POSITION AND DESCRIPTION.

Campbell township is composed of all of congressional township 29, included in ranges 21 and 22. It comprises the most valuable portion of Greene, and is the best naturally and artificially. It was one of the first portions of the county settled and always took the lead in the matter of substantial improvement.

EARLY SETTLEMENTS.

Campbell township embraces the settlements of the Campbells, the Rountrees, the Fulbrights, and other pioneers in the neighborhood of Springfield. William Fulbright, who came to the county in the year 1829, and settled where Fort No. 2 now is, west of Springfield, had previously been through what is now Greene county in 1819, but at that time settled in Crawford county. He returned to Tennessee in 1822, and lived in that State till 1829, and then came back to Missouri and settled in the immediate vicinity of Springfield, as we have stated. Kindred Rose came to the county in 1831, settled on section 28, of township 29, range 22, and has been living there from that date to the present. Alexander McKenzie, from Pulaski county, Kentucky, came 1829 or 1830, and located three miles South of Springfield. Having disposed of his place to William Townsend about 1833, he moved out to Spring river. [874]

Joseph Rountree settled on section 28 - 29 - 22, in 1831. John P. Campbell and Madison Campbell, Joseph Miller, and others settled about Springfield as is fully detailed elsewhere.

John Robertson arrived from Tennessee in the fall of 1835, and settled immediately west of Springfield on the farm afterwards owned and occupied by Judge William B. Farmer. Judge Farmer reached Springfield in July, 1840, and after an active business life in Springfield moved to his farm in 1852. Martin Ingram was one of the old settlers of east Campbell township. Coming to Springfield in 1834 he lived one year in the town, and in 1835 moved to a farm in section two. He did a large amount of mechanical work in the days of the early history of the county, and built several mills. Judge Morton settled in the same part of the township in 1836, and the succeeding year brought on his family from Marshall county, Tennessee. William Purselly settled in 1838 on section 25, of township 29, range 21. Marcus Boyd, in 1840, came from Maury county, Tennessee, and settled two miles and a half east of Springfield. Samuel M. McCorkle, father of N. A. McCorkle, settled on the Ferguson place southeast of Springfield in 1839. He was from Tennessee.

Other early settlers and settlements in Campbell township are noted in other parts of this history notably, the first chapter and in the History of Springfield.

Joseph Weaver came from Lincoln county, Tennessee (originally from Georgia), and settled on section 27 in the spring of 1830. The same spring Finis W. Shannon came from Williamson county, Tennessee, and settled on section 21. Peter Epperson settled on section 27 in 1830. The same year Isaac Wood located on section 8, township 29, range 21. Jesse Blackwell came to section 26 from Washington county (originally from Virginia), in 1831. [875]

MISCELLANEOUS HISTORICAL ITEMS--THE "FIRSTS".

The first marriage in Campbell township, is said to have been the first marriage of white persons in Southwest Missouri. It was that of Junius M. Rountree and Martha J. Miller, and the marriage occurred August 7, 1831, at the house of the bride's father, Joseph H. Miller, in section 22, township 29, range 22. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Richard Kizee, a Baptist minister. The groom was a son of old Joseph Rountree, and the bride a daughter of old Joe Miller. The parties had been acquainted in Tennessee, the Rountree and Miller families being from the same neighborhood.

Lawson Fulbright married Elizabeth Roper, a daughter of David Roper, who lived in the north part of the township, some time in 1831, and a claim is made that this was the first in the township, but it is not probable that it antedated Rountree's marriage.

The first white person that died was a son of Finis Shannon, who died on section 21, range 22, in the fall of 1830 (or 1831).

Probably the first physician was Dr. Edward Rodgers, of Tennessee, who came in 1831, and, after several years residence here, went to Texas and died there. Dr. Cornelius D. Terrell, who married old Jim Wilson's widow, and was the second county clerk, was another very early physician.

Rev. James H. Slavens, the well-known pioneer Methodist, it is believed was the first minister and held the first religious services at John P. Campbell's. Rev. Alderson was another primitive Methodist minister, and labored for the good of souls in this part of the vineyard.

The first school-house was built on the southeast quarter of section 22, range 22, in 1833. It was of logs, and built by the donated labor and material furnished by the settlers. It had a puncheon floor, a clapboard roof, and square holes in the sides for windows. Old Joseph Rountree taught the first school here, in the fall of 1833. He had about twenty pupils, and for his services his patrons paid him one dollar per scholar per mouth. [876]

EARLY MILLS.

Disputing the distinction claimed for old Jerry Pearson's mill, in the eastern part of the county, it is claimed that the first mill erected within the present borders of Greene county was built by Wm. Fulbright, in section 3, township 29, range 22, on the Fulbright farm, now (1882) occupied by his grandson, W. D. Fulbright. It was a "tub mill," and ground for customers living fifty miles away. Fulbright afterwards built another mill or rather, a millwright named Randolph did for him but it would not work, and was no good. Afterward, in 1844, his son, John L. Fulbright, put mill machinery in the same building, that turned two run of buhrs, until 1859, when he tore down the old mill, put up a new one, and added a carding machine, but had only one run of buhrs. The mill is still running, and is on the head waters of Sac. The building is 44 by 18 feet in size, and is a two-story frame.

Of Fulbright's old mill, old Wm. Jenkins used to say that when the water was low the mill-wheel would mutter out, "F-u-1-br-i-g-h-t a-n-d L-a-s-l-e-y, F-u-1-b-r-i-g-h-t a-n-d L-a-s-l-e-y, over and over, signifying that it would grind only for Fulbright and his neighbor Lasley; but when the water was high, the wheel would-rattle away merrily, "everybody - everybody -everybody !"

Chesley and Benjamin Cannefax built a mill on Walnut creek in 1832, but it never attained much importance or notoriety.

In 1832 or 1833, Augustine Friend built a corn-cracker mill at what is now known as Jones' spring, on section 27, range 21, or four miles east of Springfield. This mill was pretty well patronized.

OTHER ITEMS.

At the time of the first, settlement of this township in 1881, the nearest post-office was at Little Piney, in Crawford county, distant one hundred miles. The nearest mills of any real value were at Massey Iron Works, in Phelps county, 125 miles away.

The lumber of which the old bank in Springfield was built was principally sawed by hand. Abner Dabbs, a carpenter, sawed even the joists with a whip saw.

Wilson's creek, named for James Wilson, the old "squaw man" that lived at the mouth of the stream has a singular feature. On the farm of Russell Baker, in section 31, range 22, it sinks under ground and becomes a subterranean stream for a considerable distance.

A MYSTERIOUS MURDER.

About ten years since the dead body of a man was found in the western part of this township, in the timber. A dog belonging to a colored man brought to his master's residence a portion of a human leg. This ghastly circumstance led to an investigation, when the remaining portions of the body were discovered. From all the indications the body had been hauled in a wagon to where it was found and then dumped. Portions of the red paint of the wagon were found on the brush over which it had passed. The skull was crushed in, and it was clear case of murder but what the circumstances were has never been learned. [877]

A TRAGEDY OF THE CIVIL WAR.

Among the many tragedies of the civil war the following may be mentioned in connection with the history of this township. In September, 1862, a young man 21 years of age, named George N. Johnston, a son of John B. Johnston, left this township, with two or three companions, for the Confederate army in Arkansas. Across the line in Christian county they were captured by some Union Home Guards or Federal militia and young Johnston and another man named Hughes were killed. Another of the party named Ream, was captured, brought to Springfield, put to work on the fortifications for a time and afterwards discharged.

CHURCHES.

WASHINGTON FOREST BAPTIST CHURCH.

This church meets once a month at school house No. 5, section 28, township 29. It was organized on the 18th of August, 1877. The original members were G. F. Trustee, J. H. Bird, G. W. Greene, J. M. Cannefax, E. Woodard, J. M. Sanford, Nancy Cannefax, Jane Bird and Amy Bird. The pastors have been Rev. D. T. Baucum, R. K. Maiden and W. M. Julian is the present pastor. The present membership is 15.

UNION CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.

This church has as yet no place of worship of its own, but meets in Hazel Dell school house, situated on section 20, township 29, range 22. It was organized September 5th, 1882. The original members were J. E. Winfield, Mrs. Martha J. Winfield, Walter S. Winfield, Minerva J. Winfield, Samuel J. Gott, Mrs. Nancy E. Gott and Mrs. Nancy Campbell. Rev. J. R. Flint is the present pastor. The present membership is 7. Owing to its brief existence the congregation has but little history of interest, but it has plenty of room to grow, and who can say what it may become? [878]

ANTIOCH (CHRISTIAN) CHURCH.

Was organized in 1854 on section 5, township 29, range 22. Names of the original members were John Wood, Elizabeth Wood, James G. Wood, John M. Wood, William White, Margaret White, E. White, Weloy Roper, Minerva Roper, John Robinson, Susan Robinson and E. White. The first church was erected in 1859, a brick building, costing $200. It was dedicated in the autumn of 1859 by Elder Charles Carlton. The number of present members is 114. The pastors that served the church were Elder Joel Hardin, Charles Carlton, J. T. Roberts and Kirk Baxter (present pastor).

The cemetery in connection with this church is an important one. The site of church and cemetery comprises 20 acres. The first interments in the cemetery were made in 1860, when the bodies of Mrs. William White, Margaret Fry and a child of Elisha White were reburied here, having first been given sepulture on the White farm, some years before. The bodies named and that of Russell Roper, a boy; twelve years old, were buried here in the fall of 1860. The present cemetery comprises about four acres.

HAZEL DELL SUNDAY SCHOOL.

At the Hazel Dell school house, in section 3, range 22, a flourishing Sunday school has been in existence for five years. The average attendance is from 40 to 50, and the school is run winter and summer. J. H. Patton is the present superintendent.

BIOGRAPHIES.

LEMUEL B. AUSTIN. This gentleman is the son of Green and Nancy (Freeman) Austin, and was born in this county November 14, 1836. His father was born January 1st, 1805, and came to this county in 1834. His mother was born in September, 1808, and died in August, 1876. Lemuel was educated in the common schools of the county, and has been engaged in farming since boyhood. He lives four miles east of Springfield, and owns six hundred and seventy-nine acres of land, a good portion of which is under cultivation and well improved. Mr. Austin is extensively engaged in stock raising. He was married February 1st, 1863, to Miss Louisa J., daughter of George W. and Mary Mitchel. They are blest with a family of six children, viz.: Charles G., born December 6th, 1863; Mary E., born March 17th, 1865; Annie L, born July 22nd, 1869; Nannie V., born December 26th, 1871; Albert M., born September 4th, 1876; Blanche, born July 3rd, 1881. Mr. Austin is a member of the A. F. and A. M.

W. S. BACON. Mr. Bacon is a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Jeffries) Bacon, and was born in Franklin county, Kentucky, March 10th, 1835. He came to Missouri in 1854, and settled in Cooper county, near Boonville. Here he commenced fruit growing, and has since made it his chief occupation. In September, 1880, he came to Greene county and purchased his present home, three and one-half miles west of Springfield, where he has a pleasant and comfortable home, and is extensively engaged in fruit culture, especially berries. During the summer of 1882 he sold three hundred bushels of blackberries alone. Mr. Bacon was married April 1st, 1861, to Miss Susan Connor, of Cooper county. Their union has been blest with four children, viz.: Mary E., Robert, Sallie and Mattie. [879]

JAMES BAIR. Mr. Bair is the son of Jesse B. and Elizabeth (Bonfield) Bair, and was born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, Dec. 18th, 1845. His father was born in Adams county, Penn. Nov. 11, 1814, and settled in Ohio in 1886. His mother was born in Canton, Ohio, Dec. 20th, 1819. James was educated in the common schools of Stark county, and completed his education at Mt. Union College, Mount Union, Ohio. He then taught school during the year 1868, in Stark county, Ohio, and the following year came to Greene county, Missouri and has since made teaching his vocation, having taught in Campbell, Taylor, Franklin and Brookline townships. Mr. Bair was married August 11th,1870, to Miss Virginia, daughter of William Jeffries, and old and highly respected citizen of this county. Their union has been blest with four children, viz.: Annie L., born April 20, 1871; William M., born May 4th 1873; Victoria, born Sept. 8th, 1874, and died March 5, 1875; Charles A., born May 2nd, 1878. Mr. Bair was appointed justice of the peace in January, 1879, and still holds the office by appointment. He enlisted in company F, 80th Ohio infantry volunteers, upon the 21st of December, 1861, and served as sergeant major, and was first lieutenant at the close of the war. He was at the battle of Farmington, Miss., siege of Corinth, Iuka, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hill, siege of Vicksburg and Mission Ridge. He was on the Atlanta campaign and in many skirmishes. He was mustered out in August, 1865, without having received a wound or being taken prisoner. All of his company except fifteen were killed or wounded at the battle of Corinth.

REV. KIRK BAXTER. Mr. Baxter is a native of the city of New York, born February 26, 1829. His parents were Henry and Mary Baxter, who moved to the city of Baltimore and lived there three years. They next moved to Washington City and then to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where Kirk grew to manhood. He entered college at Bethany, Virginia, in 1848, and graduated from that celebrated institution in 1851. He then went to Wilkinson county, Mississippi, and taught school two years. He then began preaching and labored in that sacred calling until 1867, when he came to Springfield, Missouri, and took charge of the Christian church from 1867 to 1871. Three years of this time he taught a high school. He next preached in the counties of Southwest Missouri as in evangelist, but made Springfield his home. In March, 1875 he moved to Huntsville, Randolph county, Missouri, and preached there a year, and then went to Dallas, Texas, preaching for his church in that city four years. He then returned to this county and took charge of the church at Antioch, where he still holds the pastorate of that congregation. He owns the farm upon which he lives and his a pleasant home. He was married June 12, 1856, to Miss A. F. Jackson, of Clinton, Louisiana. Their union has been blest with nine children, viz.: Charles W., Mary A., Willie H. (deceased), Fannie, Cornelia, Rosa J., George H., Kirk E. and Walter Wood. In 1878, while traveling in Texas with the noted evangelist, Knowles Shaw, the train was wrecked and Shaw killed instantly.

CHARLES BENNETT. Mr. Bennett was born in Chemung county, New York, July 31st, 1847. His parents were Charles and Louisa (Canfield) Bennett. His father was born May 11th, 1807, and his mother was born May 18th, 1810. When our subject was about two years of age his parents removed to Kendall county, Illinois, where they lived until 1870, and then removed to Greene county, Missouri. Chas. Bennett, sr., lived here until May, 1882, and then returned to his county where he died July 26, 1882. Charles Bennett was educated in the common schools, and has followed farming as an occupation. He owns a fine farm of four hundred and thirty-two acres in Campbell township, well improved and in a high state of cultivation. He was married October 20th, 1881, to Miss Sarah Smith, who is a native of Kendall county, Illinois, born August 13th, 1860. Their union has been blest with one child, Charles, jr., born September 11, 1882. Mr. Bennett is a member of the Masonic fraternity, with membership at Raven Lodge, No. 303, Oswego, Illinois. He has been very successful in farming and stock raising, and is one of the substantial citizens of Greene county. In politics he is a Republican. [880]

ALLEN J. BIGGS. Mr. Biggs was born in Robertson county, Tennessee, February 14th, 1820, and is a son of David and Frances Biggs, both of whom were natives of Virginia. Allen J. lived in Robertson county until he was seventeen years of age, and then went to Callaway county, Kentucky, and lived there until 1843. He then emigrated to Missouri, and took up a claim in Greene county near his present home. He now owns one hundred and seventy acres of land, besides giving his children three hundred acres. During the war he dealt in mules, buying and selling to the government. Mr. Biggs has been married twice, the first time, February 1st, 1840, to Martha Legan, of Callaway county, Kentucky. She died in January, 1842. He was married the second time to Nancy M., daughter of John and Keziah Robertson, upon the 3rd of October, 1848. This union has been blest with five children, viz.: Napoleona (now Mrs. J. R. Debaun), Adolphus, John R., W. W., and Kizzie, now Mrs. Wilson Fulbright. W. W. was married June 20th, 1882, to Maggie D. Waltz.

ANDREW J. BODENHAMER. This gentleman is the son of Jacob and Nettie (Goss) Bodenhamer, and was born in that part of Greene county that is now Webster county, Missouri, September 13th, 1839. His parents were from Tennessee, and came to Missouri about the year 1833. Andrew came with his parents to Campbell township, this county, when he was about three years of age and was educated in the common schools. When quite young he began farming, which occupation he has always followed. In 1862 he enlisted in company A, 8th Missouri cavalry, U. S. A., under Col. Geiger. He was at the battles of Chalk Bluff, Prairie Grove, Little Rock, Brownsville and many minor engagements. He was taken prisoner at Prairie Grove, but paroled in a few days. He was mustered out in July, 1865, and returned to his farm, where he has one hundred and sixty acres of land. He was married September 5th, 1860, to Elizabeth Wharton, who was born in Dallas county, Missouri, February 1st, 1848. Their union was blest with six children. Mr. and Mrs. Bodenhamer are members of the M E. Church South, and in politics Mr. Bodenhamer is a Greenbacker. He is one of Greene's substantial farmers, and a gentleman in whom all have confidence.

DR. JOSEPH BROWN. This gentleman is the son of John D. and Jane (Bray) Brown, and was born in Randolph county, North Carolina, December 8th, 1828. His father was a native of North Carolina, born October 4th, 1804, and died in December, 1864. His mother was also a native of North Carolina, born February 29th, 1808, and is still living in Christian county, Missouri. Joseph came to Greene county, Missouri, with his parents in 1845, and was educated in the common schools of the county, and at Ebenezer. In the winter of 1858-9 he attended the McDowell Medical College at St. Louis. He then returned to this county, and began the practice in Taylor township, where he lived four years, and at Springfield the same length of time. In 1867 he located where he now lives, four miles east of Springfield, and enjoys a large and lucrative practice, besides having a farm of two hundred and seventy-five acres. Dr. Brown was married July 7th, 1857, to Martha A. McFarland, of this county born January 30th, 1838. She was the daughter of William and Martha A. (Roberts) McFarland. Dr. Brown and wife have been blest with a family of six children, three boys and three girls. They have lost two children. The doctor is a member of the A. F. and A. M., and is a Democrat in politics. [881]

E. M. CAMPBELL. Mr. Campbell is the son of J. T. and Mary A. Campbell, and was born in Greene county, Missouri, May 29,1853. His parents came to this country in 1831, and he was educated in the High School of Springfield, at the Washington University, St. Louis, in 1862-8; at the College of the Christian Brothers in 1863-4, and in 1873-4 attended the Christian University at Canton, Mo. Mr. Campbell was married June 24, 1879, to Miss Sallie M., daughter of William and Margaret White. They have one son, Albert J. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell are members of the Christian church. Mr. Campbell is a farmer and stock raiser, and owns two hundred and fifteen acres of Greene's best lands.

JASPER N. CLARK. Mr. Clark is the son of Dr. John M. and Parmelia S. (Nelson) Clark, and was born in Polk county, Missouri, March 2, 1842. His father was a native of Tennessee, and came to Polk county, in 1840, and practiced his profession until his death in 1847. His mother was also a Tennesseean, and is now living in Springfield. Jasper went with his parents to Taney county, Missouri, when he was very small, where they lived about two years, and then moved to Christian county and remained there five years. They next located in Greene county, and this has been His home ever since. He was educated in Christian and Greene counties, and finished at Carton's College. In August, 1862, he was mustered into company E, 8th Missouri volunteers, under Capt. Bodenhamer. He was at the battles of Prairie Grove and Little Rock, besides minor engagements. He was mustered out in May, 1865, as Sergeant Clark. At the close of the war he went to farming, and in March, 1870, be purchased the place where he now resides. He owns one hundred and eighty acres of land, mostly in cultivation. He raises fruit stock, ete., and is a very successful farmer. Mr. Clark was married September 11, 1866, to Miss Francis E. Snyder, who was born in Westmorland county, Pennsylvania, July 6, 1846. Her parents were John and Hannah Snyder, who came to Clark county, Missouri, in 1845. Mr. and Mrs. Clark have six children, Lula M., Charles C., Mollie H. P., Myrtle G., Bertha P., and Laura H. Mr. Clark and wife are members of the M. E. Church South. He received the Greenback nomination for sheriff in 1882, but was beaten by the Republican candidate.

JOHN RUSSELL COX. Mr. Cox is the son of John and Louisa Cox, and was born in Daviess county, Mo., January 17, 1853. His father was born in Bartholomew county, Ind., and his mother was a native of this State, and died when John was quite a boy. He was then taken by his grandfather, Nathan Cox, and reared and educated in Greene county. His chief occupation has been farming. Mr. Cox was married January 16, 1876, to Miss Mary E. Pierce. She was born in Franklin county, Arkansas, November 11, 1857. They have one child, Louisa C., born February 18, 1879. In 1882 Mr. Cox and Mr. M. N. Wertz perfected a wheat cultivator and ground pulverizer, and have applied for a patent upon the same. Mr. Cox is one of the safe, reliable young men of the county.

WILLIAM P. DABBS. This gentleman was born May 28,1829, in Virginia, and is the son of Abner, and Mary Dabbs. His parents moved to North Carolina in 1838, and remained there until 1844. They then came to Greene county, Missouri, where Wm. P. grow to manhood, in the city of Springfield. In the fall of 1861 he enlisted in the State Guards, and in February, 1862, he joined Capt Dick Campbell's company, under Gen. Price. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Champion Hill, Miss., upon the 17th of May, 1863, and held at Camp Morton, Fort Delaware and Point Lookout until March, 1864, when he was released. He then went to Clark county, Ohio, where he met his family, who had been ordered out of the county in the spring of that year. He lived in Ohio until September, 1881, when he returned to Greene County, Missouri, and bought the farm of one hundred and seventy-five acres, where he now resides. Mr. Dabbs was married October 3, 1858, to Miss Hannah M., daughter of John B. Johnston, R former citizen of Springfield. Their union has been blest with ten children, eight of whom are now living, viz.: Mary C., John W., Hannah E., Clara L., Ellen V., Edward A., Thomas E, and an infant daughter. [882]

JOHN W. DANFORTH. Mr. Danforth was the son of Josiah and Sarah Roane Danforth, and was born in Roane county, Tennessee, Sept. 19, 1800. His father was a native of Massachusetts, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. His mother was a native of Charlottesville, Va. When John W. was about nine years of age, he went to Augusta, Ga., where he received a fine education, and became an expert accountant. After coming to this county he settled in Springfield and was engaged in mercantile business under the firm name of Danforth Bros. for a number of years. In 1845 he went to Taney county, Mo., and founded the town of Forsyth, and became postmaster and county clerk. In 1856 he returned to Greene county and located three miles northeast of Springfield. During the war he was clerk in Capt. Owen's office at Springfield. He was married Dec. 19, 1838, to Priscilla, daughter of Col. William Price, of Washington county, Va. He was a colonel in the war of 1812, and died in his native county, Sept. 20, 1837. Mrs. Danforth's mother was Miss Elizabeth Cecil, born in Tazewell county, Virginia, and died Nov. 20, 1841. Mrs. Danforth was born in Washington county, Virginia, Oct. 5, 1820. Mr. Danforth was a Royal Arch Mason, and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. Mrs. Danforth is a consistent member of that church.

THOMAS E. EDMUNDSON. Mr. Edmundson is the son of Thomas and Sarah (Roberts) Edmundson, and was born in Greene county, Missouri, January 16, 1851. His parents were natives of Tennessee, and came to this county in 1844. Thomas E. was educated in this county and at Baxter's Institute, where he completed his education in 1869. He has made farming his occupation, and owns one hundred and sixty acres of land in this township, all of which is in cultivation, well improved. He was married December 19, 1876, to Miss Mary, daughter of William and Eliza (Snow) Freeman. Mrs. Edmundson was born December 4,1856. They have three children, viz.: Samuel, born October 29, 1877, Mabel, born February 13, 1879, and Olivia, born October 25, 1881. Mrs. Edmundson is a member of the Presbyterian church. Politically Mr. Edmundson is a Democrat, and one of the staunch men of the county.

DR. JAMES EVANS. Dr. Evans was born in Wayne county, Indiana, June 6, 1829. He never attended school until he was seventeen years of age, but studied some at home without a teacher. When he began school he bent his whole energy to his work. He soon began teaching and studying medicine at the same time, giving eighteen out of twenty-four hours to his books. He graduated from Rush medical college at Chicago in 1855, and practiced his profession in Lebanon, Indiana, twenty-three years, and keeping a drug store in connection with his practice. He made seven additions to the town of Lebanon during his residence there. In 1871 he came to Missouri and settled in Springfield and engaged in the drug business three years, and since has been dealing in real estate. In 1880 he purchased the farm where he now resides, at Nichols' Junction. It was known as the Robinson farm, and the dwelling is the finest brick farm house in the county. Dr. Evans now owns seven hundred acres of land in this county, besides property in Indiana, He is now rearing some thorough bred short-horned cattle, and makes a specialty of rearing stock of a high grade. He was married May 3, 1855, to Miss Louisa A. Thompson, of Boone county, Indiana. Their union has been blest with four children, viz.: Alpha D., J. B. Breckenridge, E. Ella and Freddie. Dr. Evans is a member of both the Odd Fellows and Masonic societies. [883]

BENJAMIN F. FIELDER. Mr. Fielder is the son of John L. and Mary (Denton) Fielder, and was born in Maury county, Tennessee, February 7, 1825. His parents were early settlers of Tennessee, and his father was at the battle of New Orleans. Benjamin was reared and educated in Maury and Hickman counties, Tennessee, and at about the age of twenty-one he began manufacturing cotton gins at Columbia, Tennessee, and subsequently learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed exclusively, with the exception of two years in which he was an overseer. He came to Greene county, Missouri, in November, 1855, and settled in Washington township, where he lived until the beginning of the civil war. He enlisted in the militia and was taken prisoner upon the 8th of January, 1863, but paroled in a few days. At the close of the war he settled where he now resides, three and one-half miles southwest of Springfield, where he has one hundred and fifteen acres, all under cultivation, Mr. Fielder was married October 7, 1855, to Mary Estes. They had four children, viz.: Mary A., Margaret R., William T. and Andrew J. His first wife died in April, 1863, and February 6, 1876, Mr. Fielder was married to Mary S. Barnes. Their union has been blest with three children, Emma M., Cordie B. and Benjamin F. Mr. and Mrs. Fielder are members of the M. E. church South, and in politics he is a Democrat.

JUDGE FELIX F. FINE. Judge Fine is the son of Melsor and Margaret (Sappington) Fine, and was born in St. Louis county, Missouri, Feb. 23, 1833. His father was born Aug. 14, 1801, and died Nov. 19, 1843. His mother was born Aug. 8, 1813, and died Oct. 11, 1882. Felix F. was educated in the common schools of St. Louis, and at the St. Louis University. He was engaged in farming and in the nursery business until he came to Greene county in November, 1867, and located three miles west of Springfield on the Carthage road. Here he carried on the nursery business extensively, and farmed until his removal to where he now lives, about four miles east of Springfield. He owns a fine farm of one-hundred and sixty acres, well improved. In the fall of 1882 he was elected upon the Democratic ticket as one of the county judges of Greene county, which office he now holds, enjoying the full confidence of his constituency, and guarding well the county's interest. He was married Feb. 16, 1858, to Miss Martha L. Gesferd, a native of St. Francois county, Mo. Their union has been blest with two children, only one of whom is now living. The judge and his wife are members of the Catholic church.

JOHN W. FORSHEE. This gentleman is the son of Jesse and Mary Forshee, and was born in Monroe county, Tennessee, Feb. 15, 1840. At the age of seventeen, he came to Greene county, Mo., and worked at well drilling until the war began. In the spring of 1861 he joined the Light Guard company of Springfield, and in September joined Col. Phelps' regiment, and served in that until it was discharged. He then joined the 8th E. M. M., and served in that regiment until the war closed. He was taken prisoner by Gen. Marmaduke, but paroled in five days. He is now actively engaged in farming and stock dealing, and owns a good farm. Mr. Forshee was married October 11, 1866, to Margaret Woodrow, of Fannin county, Texas. Seven children were born to this marriage, viz.: William A., Margaret J., Hattie I., Samuel N., Mattie, James and George T. Mr. Forshee is a member of A. F. and A. M. society, and one of the substantial citizens of the county. [884]

JOHN J. A. GIBSON. This gentleman is the oldest son of John and Mary Gibson, and was born in Greene county, Missouri, March 13, 1855. His parents came from Lincoln county, Tennessee, among the first settlers of this part of the county, and now reside in section 12, Campbell township. John was educated in the common schools of the county, and began farming when quite young, which occupation he yet follows. He has by industry and economy acquired considerable property, owning one hundred and twenty acres of good land. In politics he is a Greenbacker, and is a consistent member of the M. E. church South. He is one of the safe, reliable young men of the county.

JOHN S. GOTT. Mr. Gott is the son of John D. and Gracie Gott, and was born in Shelby county, Kentucky, January 26, 1816. He spent his early life in Warren county, Kentucky, and came to Greene county, Missouri, in December, 1845, and settled in Springfield. He lived there about twenty-one years, and then moved out upon the farm where he resides. He has a fine farm of two hundred acres. Mr. Gott has been twice married the first time to Miss Polly Davis in May, 1837. She died in March, 1852, leaving one daughter, Frances A., now Mrs. Robert Miles. He married the second time, August 3, 1854, Henrietta McKee, a native of Tennessee, who came to this country in 1851. They have five children living, viz.: Sarah C., now Mrs. Frakes, John D., Anthony W., A. L. and Mabel H. Mr. and Mrs. Gott are exemplary members of the Methodist church.

RICHARD S. GOTT. Mr. Gott was born June 7, 1806, in Shelby county, Kentucky, and spent his early life in his native State. At the age of seventeen he learned the carpenter's trade and followed it the greater part of his life. He came to Springfield, Missouri, in the fall of 1842, where he followed his trade for twenty-seven years altogether. In 185l he took his family to Oregon, and remained there two years and returned to Missouri. In 1854 he crossed the plains to California with a drove of three hundred and thirty head of cattle, and returned the same fall, since which he has dealt in stock more or less. In 1872 he moved out upon the farm where he now lives. Mr. Gott joined the Methodist church at Bowling Green, Kentucky, in 1828, and has ever since been an active member. He was married March 12, 1824, to Nancy H. McChesney, of Nashville, Tennessee. Their union has been blest with four children yet living, viz.: Frances, now Mrs. Gay, Samuel J., William R. and James W. The latter is still living at home, and deals extensively in stock, particularly cattle.

BENJAMIN J. GOTT. Mr. Gott is a son of Joseph and Nancy C. Gott, and was born June 15, 1843, in Arkansas. His parents emigrated to Greene county, Missouri, in 1845. Here Benjamin grew to manhood and followed farming. Upon the 18th of May, 1862, he enlisted in company A, 8th Missouri cavalry, and served until the close of the war, participating in all the battles into which his regiment was called. Mr. Gott was married Nov. 16, 1865, to Amanda. C. McCaslin, a native of Tennessee. Their union has been blest with five children, viz.: Edwin W., Fannie J., Ida B., Hattie and Charlie. Mr. Gott and wife are members of the Methodist church, of Fairview class. He owns a good farm and raises considerable stock, and for the last seven years has been in the nursery business.

JACOB GUBLER. Mr. Gubler is the son of Goachin and Varenna Gubler, and was born in Canton Thurgau, Switzerland, December 25, 1842. He was educated in the common schools of his native country, and at an early age learned the blacksmith's trade. He emigrated to America in April, 1867, and located in Macon county, Illinois, where he lived until July, 1869. He then removed to Greene county, Missouri, and located at Springfield, where he worked at his trade until January 1, 1871, when he moved out to where he now lives, four miles east of Springfield, where he owns a farm and carries on blacksmithing. Mr. Gubler is one of the safe, reliable men of the county, has made many friends here in the now world. He was married March 3, 1867, to Laugacher Ellis, daughter of Jacob and Graff Ellis. They had one child, born July 27, 1868, and died September 27, 1869. Mr. Gubler is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and he and wife are members of the Lutheran church. [885]

S. I. HASELTINE. Mr. Haseltine is the oldest son of Ira S. Haseltine, Greenback congressman from this district in the Forty-seventh Congress. He was born in Waukesha, Wisconsin, May 1, 1849. He was educated in the high school of his city, and at the Wisconsin State University. In August, 1871, be came to Missouri with his father, and has had charge of the railway station at Dorchester since October 1st of that year. He deals in grain and fruit shipping over the Frisco road. He was married November 23, 1871, to Miss Annie L. Miller, a native of London, Canada. Their union has been blest with three children, viz.: Edwin L, Alfred E. and Charlotte A. Mr. Haseltine is a member of the A. O. U. W., the Grange and Brothers of Freedom.

DAVID S. HOLMAN. Mr. Holman was born in Iredell county, North Carolina, November 13, 1824. His parents, Lazarus and Elizabeth Holman, moved to Rutherford county, Tennessee, when he was eight years of age and remained there a few years, and in 1837 they came to Missouri. They settled in Franklin county where David received as good education as the schools of that time afforded. He was licensed to preach for the M. E. Church South by the quarterly conference in the district embracing the city of St. Louis. He preached in Oregon county, Crawford county, and Lexington. He was then put for a time upon the African mission and built a church for them. He assisted at the first services held in Kansas City. He came to Springfield and spent a year, and then went to Jasper county. His health failing he went into the nursery business there in 1860. He came to Springfield in 1864, and again embarked in the nursery business in 1867, and has followed that occupation ever since, doing a good business. He was married December 14, 1856, to Miss Mary, daughter of Ellwood B. James, Esq., of Carthage, an early settler of Jasper county, and county clerk for twenty years. Their union has been blest with four children, viz.: Rosa B., Sudie L., David E., and Joy S. The family are Southern Methodists, and Mr. Holman is a Royal Arch Mason.

JESSE HOMAN. This gentleman is the son of Jesse and Elizabeth (Edgar) Homan, and was born at Boonville, Cooper county, Missouri, April 7, 1841. His father was born in Saratoga county, New York, August 21, 1801, and his mother was born in Virginia. Jesse was educated at Boonville, finishing his education at Kemper's College. Mr. Homan is a skilful pilot, having run for a number of years upon the Missouri river. During the war he was piloting in the interest of the government, and piloted a fleet from St. Louis up to Boonville for Gen. Lyon. Mr. Homan was married at Boonville, upon the 26 of December, 1867, to Miss Ruth Parrott, a granddaughter of Wm. B. Leftwich. She was born in Pettis county, Missouri, December 26th, 1847. Their union has been blest with eight children, six sons and two daughters. Mr. Homan moved to this county in 1869, where he has since been engaged in farming, three miles from Springfield. He is a Democrat in politics and Mrs. Homan is a member of the M. E. church South.

PETER HORNING. Mr. Horning was born in Portage connty, Ohio, June 30, 1842, and is the son of George and Margaret (Kerling) Horning. His parents were natives of Bavaria, Germany. Peter was educated in the common schools of his native country, and when old enough, learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked until 1876. He went to Winona, Minnesota, in 1859, where he worked at his trade until his removal to this county, in 1876. He settled in Campbell township, about two and one-half miles east of Springfield, where he owns a fine farm of eighty acres, well improved. Mr. Horning was married July 7, 1864, to Miss Johanna Daley, who was born in County Kerry Ireland, March 17, 1842. Their union has been blest with seven children, viz.: Mary E., born July 25, 1865, and died July 9, 1866; Clotilda, born December 19, 1866; George, born May 8, 1868; Cbar4es A., born November 21, 1869; Nora E., born October 8, 1871; Robert P., born September 25, 1877, and Wm. H., born December 3, 1880. Mr. Horning and wife are members of the Catholic church. [886]

THOMAS F. JESSUP. This gentleman is the son of Eli and Sarah (Lattimore) Jessup, and was born in Greene county, Missouri, March 4, 1843. His parents were natives of North Carolina, and after coming to this county, his father carried on the business of tanning, running a yard where the wagon factory now stands, and also owned eighty acres of land where North Springfield was afterward built up. Eli Jessup died in this county, and his wife died in Texas in 1879. Thomas was educated in the common schools of this township, and began learning the carpenter's trade in 1858 under Capt. Smith, of Springfield. In 1860 he went upon a farm and was farming when the war broke out. During the years 1861-2, he was in the employ of the government in the stock and teaming department. In 1863 he enlisted in company E, 6th Missouri State troops and was stationed most of the time in the county. He moved to Cole county the same year, and in the fall of 1864 was captured by Gen. Price's army and released in a few days. He came back to this county in 1868, and this has been his home ever since. Mr. Jessup was married July 20, l864, to Miss Frances, daughter of the Hon. J. W. D. L. F. Mack, a very prominent citizen of Greene, county. She was born in Maury county, Tennessee, February 15, 1844. Their union has been blest with six children, five are living, viz.: Effie L., Edward F., Pearl, Lottie, Thomas P. Mr. and Mrs. Jessup are members of the Christian church, and Mr. Jessup is a member of the Greenback party.

L. D. JOHNSON. Mr. Johnson is a son of John A. and Nancy Johnson, and was born in Giles county, Tennessee, November 11, 1845. His parents came to Greene county, Missouri in 1863. L. D. Johnson was reared upon a farm, and in 1864 began clerking in a store in Van Buren, Arkansas, and in 1872 embarked in the general merchandise business for himself. He carried on the business six years, when his father died in this county, leaving eight children, viz.: Clarissa, now Mrs. Powell, Lewis D., John A., Agnes R., Neil B., Mary V., Silas M., and Nannie V. Lewis D. then closed up his own business and has since followed farming and stock raising. Mr. Johnson is a member of the Christian church, and is one of Greene's substantial citizens.

WILLIAM D. LYMAN. Mr. Lyman is the son of Asa and Sarah Lyman, and was born in St. Lawrence county, N. Y., May 19, 1823. His parents were natives of New Hampshire, but went to Ohio when William was a boy, where he learned the blacksmith's trade. In 1843 he went to New Orleans, where he was stricken with yellow favor, and for six years after his recovery, his mind was a blank as to his early life. He then traveled in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, where he was married to Miss A. M. C. Ward, daughter of Samuel M and Martha E. (Brown) Ward. He then moved to Greene county, Tenn., and soon after to Grainger county, where they lived until coming to Greene county, Mo., in 1868. In April, 1862 he was incarcerated in the rebel prison at Madison, Ga., because of his outspoken Northern sentiments. After his release he enlisted in company C, 4th Tennessee cavalry, Lieut. Col. Thornburg. He was at the battles of Chattanooga, Mission Ridge, Lookout Mountain, Resacca, Big Shanty, Atlanta, Ft. Blakely, and Nashville. He was mustered out July 12, 1865. He was appointed veterinary surgeon in 1868, and served in that capacity until mustered out. Since coming to this county he has lived some time in Clay township, where be owns a farm of eighty acres. In September, 1873, he removed to where he now resides, carrying on his trade. He is a member of the Methodist church, and his wife of the Christian church. [887]

JOSEPH MARTIN. Mr. Martin was born in Alabama, March 28, 1822. When he was about four years of age his parents moved to Tennessee, and afterward to Illinois. In 1846 he enlisted in the 2nd Illinois regiment, company F, as a private, but was soon promoted to the first lieutenancy of his company. He served about fifteen months and was at the sanguinary battle of Buena Vista. He went to Texas in 1851, and engaged in farming and stock raising. In 1862 he enlisted in Bowland's frontier regiment, and afterwards was in Relaford's battalion, Henry McCulloch's division, and served about eighteen months. In the fall of 1865 he left Texas and spent the winter in Arkansas, and in the following August came to Greene county, Missouri, and now owns a fine farm of over three hundred acres. Mr. Martin has been twice married, the first time August 30, 1843, to Lucinda Meneese. She died in Sept. 1844, leaving one son, Lafayette, now in Texas. He was married the second time Aug. 31, 1849, to Lucinda Beets, a native of Tennessee. That union has been blest with eleven children, viz.: Elizabeth R., Jane K., Josephine, James H., Lucinda, Jerome B., Andrew J., Kenith B., Joseph, Victoria Lee and Samuel F.

REV. M. L. McCLUER. The subject of this sketch, who is as well known, perhaps, in Polk and Webster counties as in Greene, was born in Loudon county, East Tennessee, November 9, 1839. He is the only son, now living, of Joseph McCluer, who formerly lived on Little Tennessee river, in the county above named, and owned there a large farm of eight hundred acres. Rev. Mr. McCluer's mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Greenway, died when he was only three months old. He grew up and was educated in his native State, continuing with his father and engaging in farming till 1859. In April of that year, he started for the silver region of Pike's Peak. Having got as far west as Springfield, Greene county, this State, he concluded to forego his trip to the mountains, and he remained one year in Springfield. In 1860, the father, Joseph McCluer, sold out in Tennessee and came to Greene county, where the son had arrived the year before. They bought a large farm on Sac river, fifteen miles north of Springfield, lying partly in Greene and partly in Polk county. It contained seven hundred and fifty acres, and they at once began extensive farming operations. On the 25th of September, 1861, Mr. McCluer married Elizabeth Beckley, of Polk county. He continued to live with his father during the civil war, which came on about the time he was married. After the war he purchased a hundred and fifty acre farm near his father's, but on the Polk county side. Here he cleared one hundred acres of heavy timbered land, built a good house, barn and out houses, and made other necessary improvements. In this place he made his home; but concluding that he would have better health on the prairie, he moved to a farm that he purchased, one and a half miles south of Springfield, on Kickapoo prairie. This removal was in September, 1873, and he has ever since resided there. His occupation has been that of a farmer and minister of the gospel, he having been licensed to exhort by the M. E. Church South, at Hickory Grove, November 24, 1867. In March, 1868, be was licensed to preached, and has done a great deal for the upbuilding of the church since then. Chiefly through his instrumentality, assisted by a few others, a church, costing $18,000, was erected at Hickory Grove, he going around and collecting the neighbors, who convened at his house, where most of the money was subscribed in one day. Mr. McCluer organized the first Y. M. C. A. at Hickory Grove ever organized in this part of the country, of which he was elected president. At Nevada, in October, 1872, he joined the West St. Louis Conference, and was sent to Hermitage circuit, in Hickory county, which he traveled until located at his own request, in 1873, because of ill health. Soon after this he began operations at intervals as an evangelical worker, and held a number of revivals, which resulted in large accessions of membership. In the years 1875-6 he traveled Henderson circult as "supply." Though the circuit was in a demoralized condition when he began labor there, with only one organized church and two or three partly organized, and a membership of scarcely fifty, he left it with nine church organizations, and a membership of two hundred and fifty, and two established "camp grounds," with sheds, etc. for the convenience of the worshiping campers. In 1876 he joined the Southwest Missouri Conference, and was sent back to Henderson circuit, where the Lord had so abundantly blessed his previous efforts. In the fall of 1877 he was sent to Ozark mission, which he traveled one year. He was again located in l878, since when he has labored only on the evangelical plan. Mr. McCluer has a family, two sons and four daughters living, and one daughter dead. The surviving children are Ola J., Samuel J., Rebecca B., Flora P., Lafayette H. and Stella G. Mr. McClure has labored more for the good of others and less for his own financial aggrandizement than most men are inclined to do. Still, he has seen good and abundant fruit from his labors, and will have his reward here and hereafter. "The laborer is worthy of his hire," and the faithful need not fear but that the promise will be kept. [888]

CAPT. PETER McKENNA. Capt. McKenna was born in county Monaghan, Ireland, March 5, 1836, and is the son of Owen and Mary (Kelly) McKenna. He emigrated to New Brunswick and soon after to the United States. In July, 1856, he settled in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and shortly after he volunteered to go with the troops in pursuit of the Indians who were connected with the Spirit Lake massacre. Subsequently he was in the employ of the government with companies E and F of the 2nd regulars, from Fort Ridgely to Fort Kearney. In the spring of 1860 he went to Pike's Peak, Colorado. In the fall of the same year he went to Leavenworth, Kansas, where he remained until February, 1861, and then went to St. Louis, from there to New Orleans, thence to Havanna, and thence to New York. He then joined the 12th regulars and started for the seat of war. He was in the following engagements, part of the time in command of two companies, Siege of Yorktown, Gaines' Mill, Savage Station, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, 2nd Bull Run, Groveton, Antietam, Fredricksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Laurel Hill, Bethesda church, North Anna, Cold Harbor, and the Siege of Petersburg, besides many skirmishes. He was promoted to a captaincy, and during the war received five wounds. He received especial mention in the official reports for his coolness, bravery and good judgment. He was discharged August 8, 1864, In 1868 he enlisted in the 12th infantry, for three years, and during the time was in Georgia and Arizona. He was, after his discharge, connected with Q. M. department in Texas, and was Q. M. agent for Gen. S. B. Holabird. In July, 1874, he was appointed superintendent of the cemetery at San Antonio, Texas. In 1875 he was appointed superintendent of the National Cemetery at Springfield, Missouri, which position he now holds. Captain McKenna was married November 29, 1877, to Margaret McInness, who was born in New Brunswick, March 24, 1851. They have two sons and an infant daughter living, John Owen, Edward A., and Mary. The captain is a member of the A. O. U. W. and himself and wife are members of the Catholic church.

JUDGE JOSEPH T. MORTON. This gentleman is the son of John and Mary Morton, and was born in Rutherford county, Tennessee, May 9, 1808. He was reared in Rutherford and Williamson counties, where he received such education as the country afforded in those early times. He was married June 21, 1832, to Lucinda Hancock, of Maury county. Their union was blest with one son, John A. Morton, who married Margaret V. Logan, and died June 11, 1865, leaving three children, Soon after his marriage Judge Morton began farming in Marshall (then Bedford) county, Tennessee, and was also the proprietor of a mill. In 1836 he came to Greene county, Missouri, and settled upon the place where he still resides. Before the war he was extensively engaged in stock trading. During the war his sympathies were with the South, though not favoring a disruption of the Union. For many years he was director of the branch at Springfield of the old Missouri State Bank, and for four years was its president. In the fall of 1874 he was elected upon the Democratic ticket one of the associate justices of the county court. In 1878 he sent in his resignation to Governor Phelps, but it was not accepted. A few months after he again tendered his resignation and it was accepted, The presiding justice and Judge Morton favored a compromise of the railroad bond indebtedness by which it could have been effected for much less than the face value of the original bonds, by new bonds bearing six per cent instead of eight per cent, the original interest. A mass meeting was called by citizens opposed to the measure, and a strong opposing action was taken by the meeting, Judge Morton, believing his plan was best, resigned his position. [889]

J. S. OWEN. Mr. Owen is the son of C. B. and Sarah E. Owen, and was born in this county September 11, 1857. He received his education at Drury College, and since leaving school has been engaged in farming. He was married April 20, 1881, to Miss Sarah M., daughter of Reuben A. M. Rose. Their union has been blest with one son, Charles B. Mr. Owen and his brother Stephen, own two hundred and eighty-six acres of fine land. It is the old Owen homestead, and one of the best in the county.

ELKANAH QUISENBERRY (DECEASED). This gentleman was born in Clarke County, Kentueky, July 15, 1880. His father was Colby B. Quisenberry, one of the early settlers of Clarke county. Elkanah spent the greater part of his life in Kentucky. He was educated in the colleges at Winchester and Lexington, and followed farming as an avocation the most of his life. He spent some five years in Texas and New Mexico ranching, and returned to Kentucky in 1860. When the war broke out he joined Morgan's Confederate cavalry, and was taken prisoner in Ohio, on the famous Morgan raid, and held twenty-five months. When released he returned home and remained in Kentucky until 1876, when he came to Greene county, Missouri, and bought a farm. Mr. Quisenberry was married Nov. 5th, 1867, to Ellen, a daughter of John and Mahala (Adams) Thornton of Henry county, Kentucky. Their union was blest with six children, viz.: Florence B., Arthur T., Charles D)., Mattie L., Gracie E. and Gertie E., twins. Mr. Quisenberry died Nov. 13, 1880, and his widow lives upon the home place two and one-half miles west of Springfield.

JAMES H. REA. Mr. Rea was born in Franklin county, Illinois, June 29, 1846. His father Thomas Rea, was a native of Bedford county, Tennessee, born June 11, 1811, and died in Franklin county, Illinois, in April, 1861. His mother was Miss Thenia Brashers, born in Tennessee, July 14, 1811, and is still living in Franklin county, Illinois. James was educated in the common schools of that county, and began farming at an early age. In Feb. 1862, he enlisted in company K, 30th, Illinois infantry, and afterwards in company A, 136th Ill. infantry, and served until mustered out in Oct., 1864, He was at Chickamauga, Moscow, the siege of Vicksburg and Lookout Mountain, besides many minor engagements. He was wounded at Chickamauga. At the close of the war he returned to Illinois, where he lived until the fall of 1877, when be moved to this county. Mr. Rea was married Jan. 7, 1865, to Miss Nancy Eubanks, of Franklin county, Ill., born Jan. 14, 1843. Their union has been blest with eight children, viz.: Emma D., born Nov. 16, 1865; Harvey, born Oct. 11, 1867; Rosanna, born April 6, 1870; Benjamin F., born Aug. 7, 1872; Thomas B., born Sept. 19, 1874; Harry, born Aug. 10, 1876; Maurice V., born Feb. 29, 1880, and Abram born May 24, 1882. Mrs. Rea was the daughter of John D. Eubanks, M.D., born in July, 1800. He was a chaplain and surgeon in the Mexican war, and died at Tampico, Mexico, in December, 1847. Her mother was Annie Smothers, born in Tennessee, July 16, 1801, and died in Franklin county, Ill., Aug. 15, 1875. Mr. Rea lives five miles east of Springfield, on the Martin Ingram place, where he carries on farming and deals largely in live stock. [890]

ZENAS MARION ROUNTREE. 'Squire Rountree is the son of Joseph and Nancy (Nichols) Rountree, and was born June 8, 1812, in Orange county, North Carolina. He remained with his parents until April, 1832, when he came to Greene county, Missouri, and settled on a farm three miles southwest of Springfield, on Wilson's creek, and there followed shoe-making, which trade he had learned in North Carolina. He moved into Springfield in 1834, and started the first shoe shop in the town. He followed his trade until 1835, and then entered the store of Fulbright & Carter, as clerk, and next sold goods for D. D. Berry. On the 24th of August, 1837, he married Elizabeth Massey, who was but fifteen years of age at the time. After his marriage he entered lands in different parts of the country, and made his home and reared his family upon Grand prairie. They were blest with eleven children, five boys and six girls, two of the girls are dead. In 1861 Mr. Rountree, commonly and familiarly called "Uncle Buck," moved to St Louis, and was there appointed by Sample Orr, as first clerk of the register of land's office, at Jefferson City. He retained that position until 1862, when he returned to Greene county. Mr. Rountree was elected justice of the peace in 1857, and served until 1861. He was again elected in 1878. In 1880, he was elected city recorder, and served for one year. He is at present a justice of the peace in this township. His father died in 1874, and in 1876 "Uncle Buck " moved upon the old homestead where he now lives. No man in the county is more respected than he and he has promise of many years yet to live.

JOSEPH ROUNTREE. Joseph Rountree was the son of Thomas and Eva (Sturgess) Rountree, and was born in Orange county, North Carolina, in April 1782. He was the youngest of a large family, and received a good education for that early day, being very proficient in mathematics, and a good scribe. He taught school for many years in North Carolina, Tennessee and Missouri. He moved to Maury county, Tenn., in 1819, where he lived for about ten years, and then with several friends came to Missouri, and traveled about for nearly a year, looking for suitable lands upon which to locate. They finally selected Greene county as their future homes, and in 1830 Mr. Rountree brought his family and located three miles South of Springfield, upon the afterward famous Wilson's creek. He owned several hundred acres of choice lands in different parts of the county. He and another gentleman went to Boonville, Cooper county, and got a lot of fruit trees and set them out, and grow the first orchards in the Southwest. He next built a large store-house and stocked it with general merchandise in 1838, and sold goods for three years. He then sold the building to some parties at Springfield who moved it to where the court-house now stands. It was used for many years as a land office. Mr. Rountree taught school in the old log school house, three miles Southwest of Springfield for two sessions, and it was probably the first school house built in this part of the State. Mr. Rountree was married in Caswell county, North Carolina, in 1806, to Miss Nancy Nichols, by whom he had ten children, six boys and four girls, two of whom died in infancy. Those who lived to be grown or nearly so, were Junius M., living in Greene county, aged seventy-three; Zenas M., Lucius A., Louisa A., wife of Dr. Slavens, of Dallas county, Mo.; Caroline, who died when quite young; Judge M. J., Almus L., of California, who has been sheriff of Santa Cruz county for many years; Allen J., who died in his twenty-second year, and & Almarinda C., the late wife of Wm. Massey, of Springfield. Mr. Rountree died upon the 26 of December, 1874, at his home on Wilson's creek, near Springfield. [891]

DEWITT SHOCKLEY. This gentleman is the son of Benjamin and Lilly (Beal) Shockley, and was born in Giles county, Tennessee, August 9, 1889. His parents came to Greene county, Missouri, in 1841, where Dewitt grew to manhood and was educated. When he was quite young he began farming, settling upon a farm near the old Shockley homestead. In August, 1862, he enlisted in company D, 8th Missouri cavalry, under Col. Geiger. He was at the battles Prairie Grove and Little Rock, and participated in many skirmishes. He was mustered out of service in November. 1865, and in the same year was married to Miss Clarissa Brown. She was born in Tennessee May 7, 1848. She was reared in Searcy County, Arkansas, and lived there until 1862, and then came to this county. They are blessed with a family of five children, three girls and two boys. Mr. Shockley owns a farm of two hundred and ten acres of good land, and is one of the substantial citizens of the county. He and his wife are members of the Christian church.

W. M. SCHULTZ was born in Claiborne county, Tennessee, December 7, 1845. His father--Jacob Schultz -- came to this county in 1858, and settled on a large farm two miles southwest of Springfield, where he resided till his death, in 1865. Here the subject of this sketch still lives, having made farming his vocation in life. In February, 1863, he enlisted in the cause of the Sunny South, joining Capt. Brown's company, of Green's regiment and Marmaduke's division. Subsequent to this, he was on Gen. Polignac's escort, and still later was transferred to Waller's Texas regiment. He was through the Banks campaign in Louisiana, and surrendered at Marshall, Texas. Returning to his Greene county farm, he has since paid his attention to farming and stock raising, and owns a place of two hundred acres of fine land. Mr. Schultz was married June 4, 1881; to Miss L. E. Payne, a native of this county, and a daughter of Jacob Payne, one of the early settlers of Greene. One child has been born of this union, a son, named Jacob P. Schultz. Mr. Shultz is one of the steady, substantial men of the county, and does well his part in life as a tiller of the soil.

JOHN THIES. This gentleman is the son of B. and Susan Thies, and was born September 23, 1832, in Rhine Province, Prussia. His father was born in 1797, and his mother in 1800, and are now dead. John was educated in the common schools of Germany, and for a short time attended English schools. In 1854 he landed in New York city and lived there until 1858. He then traveled considerably, and late in the fall of that year went to New Orleans. During the war he was forced to join the rebel militia there, but in 1863 he went back to New York and stayed until 1866. He came to Greene county, Missouri, in April, 1871, and now owns a good farm, well improved. In his younger days be worked at the tailor's trade for a period of twenty-five years. Mr. Thies was married March 30, 1859, to Annie M. Neubig, who was born in Bavaria, Germany, July 23, 1832. Mr. and Mrs. Thies are both members of the Catholic church, and he is one of the best citizens of the county.

GEORGE W. TRIBBLE. Mr. Tribble is the son of Geo. W. and Patsey (Embry) Tribble, and was born in Christian county, Kentucky July 11, 1842. His father was also a native of Kentucky, born January 1, 1804, and is still living in Lincoln county, that State. His mother died in Madison county, Ky. When George was about nine years of age his parents removed to Lincoln county, Ky., where he was educated in the best schools of that section. He began farming when quite young, and has ever since followed that occupation. In 1862 he enlisted in the Confederate army, under Gen. Forrest, in company A, 2nd Kentucky cavalry. After the war he returned to Christian county, and farmed there until his removal to Lincoln county, in 1876. He lived there until October l5, 1879, when he came to Greene county Missouri, and settled where he now resides near Springfield. He owns a farm of eighty acres of land well improved. Mr. Tribble was married February 20, 1861, to Mary E. Beazley. She died February 27, 1862, and Mr. Tribble was married the second time to Elizabeth J. Herndon, upon the 26th of February, 1863. Their union has been blest with three children, viz.: William A., born February 1, 1862; George H., born February 4, 1864; Mary E., born April 10, 1867. Mr. Tribble is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and they are all members of the Christian church. [892]

SETH TUTTLE. Mr. Tuttle is the son of Horatio and Caroline (Horton) Tuttle, and was born in Seneca county, Ohio, February 4, 1836. Seth was educated in his native county and when young learned the wagon-maker's trade. In 1851, be went to Barry county, Michigan, and there engaged in contracting, stone, brick, and carpenter work. He had a sub-contract upon the State university building, at Fayetteville, Arkansas. In 1877 he located at Springfield, Missouri, and became the leading contractor and builder in Greene county. Among some of the leading houses he has had contracts upon are Rainey's building, Metropolitan Hotel, machine shop, and many of the best buildings in both old and new town. Mr. Tuttle moved out upon his farm in 1877, two miles from the city, which contains about five hundred and fifty acres, all in cultivation and well improved. He was appointed county superintendent of the poor farm in April, 1879, which position he has filled to the satisfaction of the people. He retired in April, 1883 to his firm. He was married October, 1856, to Nancy M. Frank, a native of Kentucky, born in l834. Their union has been blest with four children, viz.: Alice, Ellen, Minnie and Charles. Mr. Tuttle is a member of the A. O. U. W., and he and his wife are members of the Christian church.

WILLIAM H. VAUGHAN. Mr. Vaughan is the son of Davis and Susan (Wells) Vaughan, and was born in Perry county, Indiana, January 24, 1830. When quite a boy he went to Hancock county, Kentucky, where he was educated in the common schools of the county. In 1848 he returned to Perry county, Indiana, and there learned the carpenter's trade and made that his occupation until about 1874. Mr. Vaughan spent several years upon the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, and built many houses in that section of the country. He went to Henry county, Missouri, in 1869, where he lived until 1874, and then came to this county, where he has since been engaged in farming and fruit growing. He has twenty acres in fruit cultivation two and one-half miles southeast of Springfield. During the year 1882 he sold nearly one thousand dollars worth of fruit. Mr. Vaughan was married September 9, 1856, to Miss Mary E., daughter of Henry J. and Nancy J. Edwards, of Kentucky. She was born in Shelby county, Kentucky, February 15, 1886. Their union has been blest with five children, two sons and three daughters. Mr. Vaughan's grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary war and served throughout with distinction. During the war Mr. Vaughan was in the militia, and in politics is Republican. He is a member of the I O. O. F. and is president of the school board in his district.

EDWARD L. WEAVER. Mr. Weaver was born in Greene county, Missouri, February 21, 1837. His father was Joseph Weaver, and his mother's maiden name was May. They were natives of Georgia, and came to Greene county, Mo., in March, 1830. Edward was educated in the common schools of this county, and when old enough engaged in mercantile business. He was for some time with Shepard & Kimbrough, and then Weaver & Wood, and afterwards as Weaver, Wood & Co. He has been identified with the business interests of Springfield for a period of about twenty-five years. In February, 1880, he retired from mercantile business and removed to his place just upon the outskirts of the city, where he has one hundred and six acres. At present he is engaged in buying and selling stock. Mr. Weaver was married February 21, 1861, to Miss Eliza E. Smith, who was born in Springfield, Mo., July 30, 1840, She was the daughter of General N. R. and Harriet (Goodwyn) Smith. They were nativess of Virginia. Gen. Smith died in April, 1858. He was one of the most prominent property owners in the city. Mr. and Mrs. Weaver have been blest with three children, two of whom are now living, viz.: Eddie S., born June 13, 1867, and Clara V., born May 5, 1871. Mr. Weaver is a member of the Christian church, and one of the best citizens of the county. [893]

WILLIAM WHITE (DECEASED). Mr. White was born in Giles county, Tennessee, October 18, 1816. He grew to manhood in his native State, and followed farming as an avocation all his life. He moved to Greene county, Missouri, in 1853. Mr. White was married January 23, 1889, to Margaret Fry, also a native of Giles county, Tennessee. Mr. White was for many years a member of the Christian church, and one of the first to organize a class in his neighborhood. He died January 23, 1858, leaving five children, viz.: J. Frank, Margaret J., now the wife of J. E. Phelps; Mary C., now the wife of F. W. Norman; J. T. and Sallie M., now Mrs. E. M. Campbell.

REV. JOHN H. WILSON. This gentleman was born in Boston, Mass., February 27, 1810. His parents were natives of that city, and died when he was a child. He was educated at Andover, Mass., and at Williams college in 1836. After graduating he commenced teaching, which occupation he followed in New York until 1842. He was then ordained for the ministry in the Onondaga, N. Y., Presbytery. He removed from New York to Cincinnati in 1842, and became professor of languages in Farmer's college for a period of fifteen years. Then he was president of Central college, Ohio, and then, about the year 1860, he was sent as a missionary to Reno county, Kansas, where he lived two years, and then went to Park college, where he was a professor over two years. He then came to Oakland farm, Campbell township, Greene county, Mo., where he still resides. Mr. Wilson was married April 5, 1841, to Clarissa, oldest daughter of Jonathan Dickinson, of Deerfield, Mass. She was born September 4, 1815. Their union has been blest with five sons and four daughters, four of the sons being dead. Mr. Wilson is a member of the Ozark Presbytery, and occasionally preaches, though over seventy-three years of age.

MAJOR JOSIAH ZINK. This gentleman was born in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, April 1, 1822, and where he spent his early life. At the age of nineteen he learned the cabinet-maker's trade, and worked three years for $37.50 per year and clothed himself. At the end of that time he had saved enough money to buy a suit of "store clothes." He then went into partnership with a man in the cabinet business, and in about a year they were burned out entirely and Mr. Zink was left without a dollar. He then, by the help of a friend, started in trade, and in two years was able to work five journeymen. His health failing in a few years, he engaged in the hotel business until the war broke out. He took an active part in recruiting company E, 62nd Pennsylvania volunteers, and company F, 103rd regiment, and went into the last named as a private, and was promoted to the captaincy of company F. In 1863 he was discharged for disability. He served in the McClellan campaign, and during the time he was in fourteen engagements. In the old State militia he hold the rank of major. He came to Greene county, Missouri, in 1866, and owns a good farm and devotes his time to farming and stock raising. He was married January 14, 1847, to Miss Martha Simcox, of Venango, county, Pennsylvania. She died March 29, 1880, and left six children, viz.: Maggie C., now Mrs. Newell; Jefferson C., Laura E., now Mrs. Cowan; William S. T., Edward K., and Marshall S. The major is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and a gentleman in every sense. [894]


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