Jonathan Fairbanks and Clyde Edwin Tuck

Past and Present of Greene County, Missouri

Early and Recent History and Genealogical Records
of Many of the Representative Citizens


ERNEST D. HAYNES. It is not too much to say that it is possible for every able-bodied young man to prepare against those periods of misfortune and ill luck which await all mankind somewhere down the path of life, but some, instead of doing so, trust to luck, which is an elusive and capricious thing, and so, believing in the optimism of the future, they spend all on the present. The late Ernest D. Haynes, of Springfield, it seems, was wiser and his prudence urged him to pursue a different course, which, all contemplative minds will agree, is the wiser, and therefore his example is to be commended to the younger generation of readers of this work whose destinies are yet matters for future years to determine and who are hesitating at the parting of the ways, apparently unable to determine which course to pursue.

Mr. Haynes was born in Putnam county, Missouri, May 21, 1867. He was a son of Simon and Mary Belle (Smith) Haynes, the father a native of Missouri and the mother of Kentucky. He is now living in Arkansas, the mother of our subject being deceased. Simon Haynes has been a real estate dealer and promoter, and very active in politics, and has held several county offices on the Democratic ticket. His family consisted of four children, namely: Mattie M., deceased; Cora is living; Myrtle is living; and Ernest D., of this sketch.

Our subject grew to manhood in Putnam county and received a good common school education. He was engaged in mining for several years during his younger days, in Utah, interested in gold and silver mines. Returning East he began railroading in Ft. Scott, Kansas, becoming an engineer on the Kansas City, Ft. Scott & Memphis road, which is now under lease by the Frisco system, and he continued to work as such until 1901, when he went into the coal and fuel business in Ft. Scott, under the firm name of E. D. Haynes Coal Company, remaining there, enjoying a large business, until 1909, when he went to West Plains, Missouri, and purchased the ice plant there. Selling out later he bought a hack and buggy line in Ft. Scott, but subsequently returned to West Plains, where he remained two years, and in 1910 located in Springfield as manager of the Consumers Ice Company, and later bought the Clinton Ice & Fuel Company which he operated with his usual success until his death, having changed the firm name to the Haynes Ice & Fuel Company.

Mr. Haynes was married on December 16, 1891, in Park City, Utah, to Margaret Nolan, who was a native of New Jersey, and a daughter of Philip and Mary (Lyons) Nolan, both natives of New Jersey. Mr. Nolan was for a number of years engaged in the woolen mill business, and he and his wife spent their lives in their native state and died there. Their family consisted of ten children, six of whom are still living.

To Mr. and Mrs. Haynes only one child was born, Myrtle Haynes, whose birth, occurred on October 24, 1892. She was given good educational advantages. She married William M. Hamilton, who is in partnership with Mrs. Margaret Haynes in the fuel business at 331 North Campbell street, Springfield, under the firm name of the Hamilton Ice and Fuel Company, with yards at Campbell and Water streets. They have built up a large and growing business and are making a pronounced success. Promptness and honesty of service is their motto.

Politically, Ernest D. Haynes was a Democrat. Fraternally, he was a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias and the Ancient Order of United Workmen.

The death of Mr. Haynes occurred on October 31, 1912. He was known as a man of industry, making a success of whatever he turned his attention to, and he numbered his friends by the scores wherever he was known.

[1389-1390]


A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y
Table of Contents | Keyword Search
Greene County History Home | Local History Home