Pictorial and Genealogical Record
of Greene County, Missouri

Together with Bibliographies of Prominent Men of Other Portions of the State, Both Living and Dead


F. M. McDAVID. Of the younger element of our prominent, energetic and influential citizens, none are better known than F. M. McDavid, attorney at law. He has already attained a standing in the legal fraternity, having drawn to him a good practice, and appeared in many important suits, winning victories over which older advocates, even, would feel exultant, and which are doubtless only fore-runners of the accomplishments of the future. He is a product of Montgomery County, Ill., born December 11, 1863, and the son of Thomas W. and Louisa J. (Blackburn) McDavid, both of whom have passed all their days in Illinois. The McDavid family is of the Scotch-Irish origin and the great-grandfather, Patrick McDavid, was an early settler of that grand old State, Virginia. His descendants moved to Tennessee, among them William McDavid, the grandfather of our subject. The latter was a soldier in the War of 1812 and also served in the Blackhawk War. He was with Jackson and participated in the battle of New Orleans. About 1819 he moved to Illinois and was one of the pioneers of Montgomery County, where he was engaged in tilling the soil. He was prominent in political affairs and was a public-spirited citizen. A member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church he was one who assisted in organizing that church in Montgomery County. His death occurred in 1865. In politics he was a Democrat. His wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Johnson, was a native of Tennessee. She died in Illinois in 1883 at the age of eighty-three years. They were the parents of a large family of children of which the father of our subject was the youngest son. The latter attained his growth on a farm, secured a good education and taught school, being one of the foremost educators of Montgomery County. When thirty years of age he became a minister in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and is filling a pulpit at the present time. In connection he is also engaged in farming. He was married to our subject's mother about 1856 or 1857 and a family of twelve children was the result, all now living: Dora, wife of M. B. Traylor. who is a merchant at Coffeen, Montgomery County, Ill.; Lizzie, wife of L. A. File who is a merchant at Irving, Ill.; Frank M. (subject); Ella, married M. R. Walker, and now resides in California; Maggie, married John Shepperd; Anna is a teacher in Coffeen, Ill.; Cook, Emmett, Minnie, Lena, Lester and Horace. The last five are single and at home. From an early day the McDavid family has been Democratic and Thomas W. McDavid is no exception to the rule for he is a stanch advocate of the principles of that party. He owns a fine farm of 400 or 500 acres, is an accomplished and polished gentleman, both by instinct and training, and possesses generous, true-hearted and hospitable instincts. He has devoted much of his life to church work. F. M. McDavid was born and reared on his father's farm and supplemented a fair education received in the common school by attending the High School at Hillsborough, Ill. Following this he taught school for six years in Montgomery and Madison Counties and was then principal of the Donnelson school for two years. Later he took up the study of law and in 1889 was admitted to the bar. He came to Springfield in September of that year, with George Pepperdine, and in company with him began practicing his profession. In 1890 be formed a partnership with William L. Atkisson and they have continued in company up to the present. They are most capable members of their profession and are highly reputable citizens. Mr. McDavid is single and resides at 571 East Elm Street. Socially he is a member of the Masonic order and the Modern Woodmen. He, is also connected with the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and in politics supports the platform of the Democratic party, having been an active worker for his party since coming to Springfield. He is a descendent of a long line of worthy people who have ever been interested in the welfare of the country, and he may well feel proud to look back over the record.

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