Pictorial and Genealogical Record
of Greene County, Missouri

Together with Bibliographies of Prominent Men of Other Portions of the State, Both Living and Dead


G. M. SEBREE. It has been said and truly said, that "some men are born great, some have greatness thrust upon them, and some achieve greatness," and to this last and most important class belongs the subject of this sketch--G. M. Sebree-who was born in Fayette, Howard County, Mo., in 1862, a son of John P. and Louisa M. (Daley) Sebree, the former of whom was born in Scott County, Ky., and was among the early and eventually the most prominent pioneers of Missouri. The family took root on American soil during the Revolutionary period and the name later became well known throughout Kentucky. The subject of this sketch was one of seven children, the other members being Lucy, who died after having become the wife of a Mr. Turner; Urner, who was lieutenant commander on the ship "Baltimore" which was at Chili during the trouble with that country; Mary Y.; John P., who is chief clerk in the auditor's office at Jefferson City, Mo.; Frank P., who is a successful attorney of Kansas City, Mo., was formerly a resident of Saline County, Mo., which he represented twice in the State Legislature; Lawrence D., is at Yuma, Ariz., where he is practicing medicine, having graduated from the St. Joseph Medical School in 1883, after which he practiced for some years, and Alice, who is living in Howard County, at Fayette, the wife of John _________. The father, John P. Sebree, died in 1882, having been a resident of Howard County for fifty years. He was not connected with any church, but his wife was an earnest and consistent member of the Baptist Church. He was a Mason of many years standing, and in politics was a Democrat. He became the owner of a good home in Howard, and was the owner of a fine tract of 500 acres of land, which is still in possession of his widow. During the great Civil War he was a Union man, but bad a brother who was in the Confederate Army. He took a prominent part in the affairs of the county. was judge of the same for some time, and in 1813 was appointed warden of the state penitentiary, which office he held four years. He was well known in political circles and was much respected by all who had the honor of his acquaintance. He died at the age of sixty-five years. His wife is a member of the old Daley family, of Kentucky, and throughout the greater portion of her life has been an active church worker. The grandfather Sebree was an old pioneer of the State of Kentucky, and in that State was married. G. M. Sebree, the immediate subject of this sketch, was educated in Central College at Fayette, but in 1882 left school and returned home to cultivate the old place, having learned the details of farming as a boy and acquired the rudiments of his education in the district schools. In 1883 he commenced the study of law by reading at home for six months, but in 1884-85 he attended the St. Louis Law School, after which he was examined by the Circuit Court of St. Louis in 1885, and went immediately to Marshall, Mo., for the purpose of opening an office. He was thus engaged as a partner of his brother for eight months, then went to Higginsville, Lafayette County Mo., where he established himself in the practice of his profession, and during the two years that he remained there, he was elected city attorney. In May, 1888, he came to Springfield, and here he has figured prominently in many of the most important cases that have come up. He is associated with W. D. Talwell in the practice of his profession, is attorney for the Frisco railroad and for several large wholesale houses of the city. He is an able and experienced attorney and has brought many cases to a successful issue for his clients. He has always been in sympathy with the Democratic party and has taken an active interest in political matters, being a delegate to numerous conventions. He is a member of Salome Lodge, No. 228, of the A. F. & A. M. His office is in Room 15, Baker building, and he makes his home at the Metropole Hotel. He has already become well known in his professional capacity throughout Missouri, Arkansas and the Indian Territory, and has already become eminent.

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