A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Greene County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser



[1]

Abbott

Abbott was located in Franklin Township. It was situated at Section 21, Twp. 30 N, Range 21 West, east of Fellows Lake. Highway AA runs along the north side of this section. (--Map of Greene Co., 1912; Gen. Highway Map of Greene Co., issued by the Missouri State Highway Dept., 6-1-65.)

In 1919 the population was 10. (--Commercial Atlas of U. S., Rand, McNally.)

Alsop

In Franklin Township. James Alsop and Samuel Scroggins settled on Little Sac in 1831. (--Holcombe's History of Greene Co., 1883, p. 916.)

Alsop was situated at Section 20,Twp. 31 N, Range 21 West near the junction of H & CC. (--Map of Greene Co., 1912, with the aid of Gen. Highway Map of Greene Co., 1965.)

Asher

Asher was in Cass Township, directly west of Cave Spring. It was the first station north of Willard. (--Geological Survey Map of Greene Co., Springfield Sheet, 1886, reprinted in 1927; Map of Greene Co., February 8, 1967, W. A. Kunz, courtesy of Roy Blunt, County Clerk. This map is a part of this directory.) See Pearl.

Ash Grove (formerly Kimbrough)

Six or seven years before the (Civil) War, a store was started here by Joseph Kimbrough and Charles Sheppard (Shepherd), and this was the first commencement of the growth of the town of which Kimbrough was the first resident. Throughout the war the place, which was composed of a store and blacksmith shop, was called "Kimbrough."

Sometime after 1840 a post-office was established at the residence of William G. Summers, and called "Ash Grove." After the war it was removed to the town, and Ash Grove then took its name from the post-office. (--A History of Greene Co., Past and Present, 1915, Fairbanks & Tuck, Vol. 1, p. 208; History of Greene Co., 1883, Holcombe, 626.)

It is situated at Section 20 & 21, Twp. 30 N, Range 24 West on Highways 160 & F. (--Gen. Highway Map of Greene Co., 1965, The Missouri State Highway Dept. Unless otherwise noted all map locations are from this map.)

[2]

Bassville

According to best information available, Jackson Township was settled as early as 1820, when Andrew Bass came in sometime in December of that year, and located one-half mile west of present Strafford.

In the year 1830, Andrew Bass put about nine acres of land in cultivation at the place, where he first settled, and at the close of that year, moved about six miles north to Section 4, Township 30 N, Range 20 West. The remains of that old pioneer and his wife now repose on the farm where he lived for many years. (--History of Greene Co., 1883, Holcombe, pp. 903, 904.)

The post-office was discontinued in 1905 due to R. F. D. Mail via Strafford. (--General Scheme, p. 41.)

It is situated at Section 4, Twp. 30 N, Range 20 West near the junction of Highway KK and 125. (--Gen. Highway Map of Greene Co., 1-13-64, by Missouri State Highway Department. Unless otherwise noted all map descriptions are from this map.)

Battlefield

Battlefield is situated at Section 24, Twp. 28 N, Range 22 West. It is on Highway FF north of Christian Co. line.

Mail via Brookline Junction. (--Standard Ref. Guide of Missouri, 1974, Rand, McNally.)

Bethesda

Bethesda was near Highway O east of Willard. It was situated at Section 29, Twp. 30 N, Range 22 West. (--Map of Greene Co., 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Bird Eye

At one time there was a store, a school, and possibly a post-office here. Some years ago, after a "squabble", the school house was moved "lock, stock and barrel" to a point west of Highway 13, to a place called "Frog Pond." After another election was held, the school house was moved back to the original location. Mrs. Roy (Vida) Jinks; phone call to J. L. O'Quinn.

It was situated at Section 30, Twp. 31 N, Range 22 West. (--Map of Greene Co., 1953, Springfield Blue Print Co.)

Bishop

Bishop was near Willard; mail via Willard. (--Rand, McNally Commercial Atlas, 1919.)

[3]

Bois D'Arc

This town was founded by John Bymaster, who moved to the site in the spring of 1872, and purchased there-on six acres of land of Dr. W. C. Swinney. Formerly for thirty-three years or more, there had been a post-office called Bois D'Arc, a few miles to the southeast where Campbell Station was, in Section 15, Range 22 West, but in the year of Bymaster's settlement, the office was removed to his house, and he was appointed postmaster. He held this position for several years. For the first four months of his official existence, Mr. Bymaster carried the mail to his office himself. Then he had a road laid out by his house and the stage traveled along the thoroughfare. The post-office department was notified and the stage was compelled to leave the mail with Mr. Bymaster. The name "Bois D'Arc" (pronounced BO-DARK) is that given to that Osage Orange tree.

Bois D'Arc is located upon a part of Sections 1 and 11 of Township 29 N, Range 24 West, in Center Township, fifteen miles northeast of Springfield. This place is a successor of a town of the same name which was located at an early date at the head of Clear Creek, some two miles east of the present town. When the Kansas City, Springfield and Memphis Railroad (now a part of the Frisco) was built in 1881, the present town was surveyed, and at first was known as "New Bois D'Arc," but soon dropped the first of the name. (--History of Greene Co., 1883, Holcombe, p. 646; Fairbanks & Tuck, Past and Present of Greene Co., 1915, p. 210.)

It is situated at the junction of T & UU, west of Springfield Airport.

Brookline

Brookline stands on the west half of Section 2, Township 28 N, Range 23 West. It was laid out by the railroad company, upon the completion of the road to this point in the fall of 1871. The first building was erected by T. M. Mills in October of that year. The Union Baptist Church at Brookline was organized at Little York (1862?), then a hamlet of a few houses, about two miles and west of the present site of Brookline. It was moved to Brookline and given to the people by Charles McClure (buried in Brookline Cemetery). (--Holcombe, p. 674; Springfield Leader & Press, December 5, 1968.)

Buckley

Buckley was located on the Bolivar line of the Frisco Railroad, near the Polk County line. A post-office had been established here but it was discontinued in 1905 due to R. F. D. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, Walter Williams, p. 393; General Scheme, 1905, p. 41.)

A map of Missouri, 1903, Geo. P. Cram, shows Walnut Grove Station or Buckley P. O.

[4]

Campbell Station

Campbell Station was near the former site of Bois D'Arc at Section 15, Twp. 38 N, Range 22 West. (--Holcombe, p. 646; Fairbanks & Tuck, Vol. 1, p. 210.)

Cave Spring

In the central part of Cass Township is also one of the oldest villages of Greene County. It is located upon a part of the Southwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 4, Township 30 N, Range 23 West. It takes its name from a very spring that flows from a cave-like depression, almost in the center of town. The first resident of Cave Spring was John Grigsby, who built a house of logs about 1839. A store was established by Alfred Staley in 1848 with goods hauled overland from Boonville. (In 1968 there was a store here, and several dwelling houses.) (--Fairbanks & Tuck, Vol. 1, pp. 206, 210; Personal observation.)

Mail via Walnut Grove. (--Standard Reference Guide of Missouri, 1974, Rand, McNally.)

It is on Highway AC, north from 123.

Chapel Grove

Chapel Grove was a post-office 4-1/2 miles northwest of Springfield. (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Mo. 1874, p. 218.)

Clair

Clair was in Taylor Township, southeast of Turners. It was situated at Section 4, Twp. 28 N, Range 20 West. (--Map of Greene Co., 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Cody

Cody is situated at Section 15, 16, Twp. 28 N, Range 20 West, at the junction of Highways 125 and 60.

When Highway 60 was built the Harmony Baptist Church was removed and relocated about one-quarter mile south. (--Phone call to a Mrs. Betherum.)

Mail via Rogersville. (Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Crabtree

Crabtree was situated at Section 15, Twp. 29 N, Range 20 West, northeast of Turners. (--Map of Butterfield Stage Line.)

This area is east of Highway 125; YY runs on the north side of the section.

[5]

In the eastern part of the county a man by the name of Davis settled as early as 1822, and certainly not later than 1824 or 1825. His location was the farm of Col. John H. Price, in Taylor Township, on the James River. He built a cabin on a point projecting down into the James River, and lived there it is supposed for five years. In 1836, when Crabtree Price came to the spot, the house was no longer visible, but the site could still be plainly traced. It is thought that Davis had been killed by the Indians. (--Brinks-McDonough Atlas of Greene Co., 1876, p. 19.)

Daniel

Daniel was situated at Section 22, Twp. 28 N, Range 21 West, north of Mumford. (--Map of Greene Co., 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Deep Spring

Deep Spring was a post-office listed on page 54 of Brinks-McDonough Atlas of Greene Co., 1876.

Location could not be learned.

Demund

Although this place is shown on some old maps, it was not a town. It was at the east end of Moss-American Creosote Plant at the west end of Atlantic Street in Springfield. It was a yard office to handle the switching for the Creosote Plant.

Later, the name was changed to Ben Wood, in honor of a former vice-president of the Frisco Railroad. It consists of a yard office where a yardmaster and an engine crew are headquartered. (--Miss Barbara Johnson of Moss-American Creosote Plant; Fred Scharff at Frisco Crane house, both by phone.)

Delaware Town

A post-office listed in Postal Guide, 1846. This area now is in Christian County.

Dickersons

It was in Taylor Township, between Turners and Palmetto, on the Frisco R. R., Memphis line.

Possibly it was situated at Section 33, Twp. 29 N, Range 20 West. (--Map of Butterfield Stage Line.)

[6]

Dorchester (later known as Haseltine)

Dorchester was located on the N. E. quarter of Section 24, Twp. 29 N, Range 23 West. An excellent plat of Dorchester is shown on page 53 of Brinks-McDonough Atlas of Greene Co. Sometime later the name was changed to Haseltine, a ticket office for Frisco. It was a "flag stop." Tickets were sold here for many years until passenger service was curtailed. The extensive Haseltine Orchards were adjacent. Miss May Haseltine said she had sold tickets at this for many years. (--New Atlas of Mo., Campbell, p. 34; Brinks-McDonough Atlas of Greene Co., 1876, p. 53; Miss May Haseltine.)

The site is approximately one-quarter mile south of the Clover Leaf of I-44 west of the west city limits of Springfield.

Ebenezer

The oldest outlying village is undoubtedly Ebenezer. It is located on Section 12, Twp. 30 N, Range 22 West in Robberson Township. The first settler was a man named Painter (or Paynter) in the year 1831. In 1834 the celebrated Robberson family came from Tennessee and located in the neighborhood. The family consisted of the widowed mother, Elizabeth, seven sons and a like number of daughters. The prairie where they settled took the family name and the township afterwards organized also bears that title today. At Ebenezer was organized a church, and when the question of a name was up, someone suggested "Ebenezer," "Thus far the Lord has led us on," and thus the name of both church and hamlet was settled. Here was, at a very early day, the site of Ebenezer College, long since discontinued. There is a church building, flour mill, thriving public school, also several general stores (1915). The college began as an academy in 1845, and in 1909 united with Scarritt College of Neosho, Missouri. The new college was established at Morrisville, Missouri, and became known as Scarritt-Morrisville College. (--Fairbanks & Tuck, Vol. 1, p. 207; clipping from Springfield News & Leader, Sept. 1968; personal observation.)

In 1968 the mill had become a feed mill and the school was consolidated with another district. There was one general store, and several dwellings and church buildings. Ebenezer is reached via Highway WW from 13.

Elmwood

Elmwood is located at Section 15, Twp. 29 N, Range 22 West. It was the second station west and north of Nichols Junction. It had several stores as well as dwelling houses. In 1968 there was one grocery store, a church, and a few dwelling houses. It is situated at the junction of AB & E. (--Gen. Highway Map of Greene Co.; Mrs. Dave Dowler.)

Mail via Springfield.

(--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[7]

Evans (Evans Station)

Evans Station, Greene County, was at the home of Joseph Evans, an early settler in the region. The location was nine miles north of Springfield in Township 30 N, Range 22 West, Section 23, approximately one-quarter mile east of the newly established line of Highway 13, which ran originally in front of the house. The original house and section was a two-story, dressed walnut log building with porches and red chimneys. >From a survey of the few foundation and chimney ruins, the approximate dimensions of the building were: 37 feet 6 inches wide and the same long. It was between Ebenezer and Glidewell. (--Butterfield Stage: Along the Old Wire in Missouri and Arkansas, in the Springfield Public Library.)

A grist mill was built by Joseph Evans, and he ventured to erect a frame dwelling house and for years it was the admired of all admirers, everyone being curious to know how much it cost. (--Holcombe, p. 916.)

Expansion

Expansion was in Washington Township and was east of Galloway. Mail via Rogersville. (--Rand, McNally, 1919.)

It was situated at Section 12, Twp. 28 N, Range 20 West. (--Map of Greene Co., 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Fair Grove

In the northwest part of the county is Fair Grove, also an old town. It is located upon the northeast quarter of Section 29, Township 31, Range 20, in Jackson Township. It is a thriving trading-point. It has a number of well-stocked stores, a fine school, two churches (1915), and is on the lately located "Lake to the Gulf Highway" from Duluth, Minn., to the Gulf of Mexico. (--Fairbanks & Tuck, Vol. 1, p. 206; personal observation.)

It is situated at the junction of 65, CC & E.

Fruitland

Fruitland is in Franklin Township. There is a store here as well as several dwelling houses. It is on Highway 65 at the junction of old Buffalo Road. It is situated at Section 22, Twp. 30 N, Range 23 West. (--Gen. Highway Map of Greene County; personal observation.)

Galloway

Galloway was located at Section 9, Twp. 29 N, Range 21 West on Highway 65. There were several stores located in Galloway at one time and several years ago, it was an important shipping point for hogs. It was on the Chadwick Branch line of the Frisco. (--C. D. Utley; personal observation.)

As of July 1, 1969, it became a part of the City of Springfield, due to the extension of the city limits.

It is in the southeastern corner of the city near the junction of Highways 65 & M.

[8]

Glidewell

Glidewell is in 2nd. Robberson Township. At one time it had two stores, a blacksmith shop, a mill, a fine school and two churches.

As of 1979 the stores, mill and blacksmith shop are gone. The school is a unit of Willard Consolidated District. The two churches remain as well as several dwelling houses.

It is situated at Section 23, Twp. 30 N, Range 22 West on old Highway 13 approximately 1/2 mile south of O.

The post-office was discontinued in 1905 due to R. F. D. (--Missouri Scheme, p. 41.)

Gates (later Rule, 1917; Kissick, 1925)

Gates was located in Clay Township on the Frisco Railroad. It was situated at Section 29, Twp. 38 N, Range 21 West. Name changed to Rule, 1917. (--Gen. Highway Map of Greene County; Map of Mo., 1911, 1917, Rand, McNally.) See Kissick.

Goodlander

Goodlander was between Nichols and Elwood on the Kansas City line of the Frisco Railroad. (--Map of Mo., 1903, Geo. P. Cram Co.)

Hackney Mills

Hackney Mills was in 2nd. Robberson Township. At one time it had a grocery store, a post-office and a mill.

The post-office was discontinued in 1905 due to R. F. D. (--General Scheme, p. 41; phone call to J. L. O'Quinn.)

It was situated at Section 7, Twp. 30 N, Range 22 West, northeast of Willard. (--Map of Greene Co., 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Harold

Harold was located in Section 36, Twp. 31 N, Range 24 West.

The post-office was discontinued in 1905 due to R. F. D. (--General Scheme, p. 41.) Mail via Walnut Grove.

It was very near Highway 123.

Haven

Haven was situated at Sections 5 & 6, Twp. 29 N, Range 24 West, near the junction of T & F. Map of Greene County, 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Kimbrough

See Ash Grove.

[9]

Hays

Hays was located in 1st. Campbell Township. It was a station on the Memphis line of the Frisco Railroad.

It was situated at Section 21, Twp. 28 N, Range 21 West. (--Rand, McNally Commercial Atlas, 1919; Map of Greene County, 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Hazel Dell

Hazel Dell was three and one-quarter miles west of the Public Square in Springfield. It was on the John Robertson farm now owned by George Young. (--Holcombe, pp. 898, 899; George Young.)

Heady

Heady was in 1st. Robberson Township. It was situated at Section 33, Twp. 30 N, Range 22 West, near Highway 13 south of Polk County line, southeast of Sacville. (--Map of Greene County, 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Hickory Barren

Hickory Barren was located in Franklin Township, on Section 10, Twp. 30 N, Range 21 West. There was a store, a blacksmith shop, and a school-house here. The store was built by C. & W. Appleby in the winter of 1881. A post-office was established before 1861, but was discontinued during the Civil War. After the war, the office was re-established, but it was discontinued in 1905 due to R. F. D. (--Holcombe, pp. 989, 899; General Scheme, p. 41.)

Since Hickory Barren was located on the old Buffalo Road, it was an overnight stop between Buffalo and Springfield. The school was consolidated with the Fair Grove Consolidated District in 1959. The old school building, store and one or two other buildings remained as of 1963. (--Miss Shirley Hartley; Personal observation.)

Hickory Barren may be reached from the first road past Highway 65 leading north from KK.

Hunt's Mill

Hunt's Mill was located at Section 22, Twp. 30, Range -- West. There was here a general store, recently established (as of 1888). Jonathan Hunt was the proprietor of the mill, which was operated by springs in the township, two of which had a fall of 40 feet. (--Holcombe, p. 899.)

Kissick (earlier Gates; then Rule; finally Kissick)

The James River Power Plant of Springfield City Utilities is located here.

[10]

Junction City (later known as Nichols Junction)

It is situated at the crossing of the Frisco line to Tulsa and Oklahoma points and the Kansas City-Birmingham road. It is four miles west from Springfield in Campbell Township. It was originally laid out by the later Doctor James Evans, in 1882, and was called "Junction City." Later it took the name of Nichols in honor of Danton R. Nichols, an early superintendent of the Frisco with headquarters in Springfield. (Fairbanks & Tuck, Vol. 1, p. 210.)

It is situated at Section 17, 18, Twp. 29 N, Range 22 West.

In December, 1968, it became a part of the City of Springfield due to an election extending the city limits.

It may be reached by going west on Nichols St. This road takes one right in the center of town.

Ingram (or Ingram Mill)

The Ingram Mill was established in 1840 by Sidney S. Ingram, one of the earliest Springfield settlers. It was in Campbell Township, on the James River. The site is east of Springfield about two miles upstream from Lake Springfield. A flood in 1909 washed away most of the dam and damaged the building. Only some of the lowest stones in the dam remain at the site today. (--Rand, McNally Commercial Atlas, 1919; undated clipping from Springfield Leader & Press.)

The post-office was discontinued in 1905 due to R. F. D. Mail via Springfield. (--General Scheme, p. 41.)

Langston

Langston was a mill on the Chadwick Branch of the Frisco Railroad between Springfield and Chadwick. It was a regular stop on this line. It is possible a few houses were near Langston. It is near the present site of Consumer's Bakery and the Elks Club; Glenstone Block Company material yard is adjacent. (--Personal observation.)

Lon

Lon is shown on a map in The State of Mo., in 1904, Walter Williams, p. 393. It was on or near James River, northeast of Turners, near the Webster Co. line.

Luck

Luck was situated in Cass Township at Section 21, Twp. 30 N, Range 22 West. (--Map of Greene Co., 1912, Rand, McNally.) Highway BB runs on the north side of this section which is east of Walnut Grove.

Lyman (or Lyman's Switch)

This was in the general area of Nogo or Mulroy. (--Evening in Wisconsin Edition Atlas, 1896, Rand, p. 47.)

[11]

Little York

In the year of 1835 John McCall, a veteran settler of Greene County, entered a tract of government land located about two miles west of the present site of Brookline. He later sold this land to Chelsey C. Rainey, whose son, George Rainey, operated a farm on the same site. The elder Rainey secured the services of James H. Goodwin, a surveyor, and the two platted the town of Little York.

There were 20 lots in the town and within a very short space of time every one of them was taken up by early settlers. "Blind Tigers" soon sprang up, it is said, and Little York became the meeting place and rendezvous of the young of Greene and surrounding counties.

Among the residents of that time was John Potter, a merchant who was later county collector of this county. Descendants of Potter now (1911) live at Brookline and Republic. Another was Nick Potter, brother of John, who was also at Little York in those days. He now (1911) is past 70 years of age and is still living (1911) at Brookline.

Dr. Theodore Youngblood, whose son, C. M. Youngblood, is proprietor of a clothing store on South Campbell Street in this city, was another resident of Little York. Others were John A. Youngblood, a former county engineer for Greene County; Dr. Phillips, father of W. S. Phillips, C. C. Conley, Captain E. M. Morris, Dr. Still, T. J. Abernathy and W. L. Spellman.

When the Frisco Railroad built through that section in 1872, Little York was not on the route and the town came to an end. Practically all the citizens leaving there for Brookline.

In 1911 George Rainey, a son of the originator of the town, purchased from the many property owners the various lots which made up the town and since many of the title holders had been in law suits at one time or another, the purchaser had an examination made of each abstract.

The firm of Howard-Stockard Abstract Company made the investigation and the abstract showing the entire site of the second town in Greene County is ready for delivery to the new owner of the land.

Corn is being planted in the main streets of the one-time prosperous city and soon the entire town will become one of Greene County's best farms, passing back into the condition it was found in years ago. (--Sunday News & Leader, Springfield, Missouri, October 22, 1961. "The Good Old Days, 50 Years Ago in Springfield.")

[12]

General Lyon marched on the (1st) of August, 1861, to the crossing of Wilson's Creek, 10 miles from Springfield, and was there joined by the force under Major Sturgis, then encamped near Little York, about 4 miles west from the crossing...

...Lieutenant Farrand, with his troop of calvary, one piece of artillery, and the remnant of Sigel's command, joined us on the Little York road, about 6 miles from the battlefield... (--War of the Rebellion, Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Vol. 3, p. 58, p. 97.)

Mascot

Mascot was in an area near the corner of North Fort Ave., and Talmage St., in Springfield. In 1905 it was an independent post-office. Besides the post-office, there was a small hamlet consisting of a store, a blacksmith shop and a few dwellings. (--Mrs. C. C. Williford. She said, "I was born in Mascot.")

The post-office was discontinued in 1905, due to R. F. D. Mail via Springfield. (--General Scheme, p. 41.)

Manning

Manning was in Clay Township, east of Galloway; mail via Galloway. (--Rand, McNally, 1919.)

Mugans

Mugans was near Ash Grove; mail via that point. It is possible that it was located in Boone Township. (--Rand, McNally, 1919.)

Mulroy

Mulroy was near Strafford; mail via that point. (--ibid)

It was situated at Section 1, Twp. 29 N, Range 21 West. (--Map of Greene County, 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Mumford

Mumford was situated at Section 26, Twp. 29 N, Range 21 West. (--Map of Greene County, 1912, Rand, McNally.)

About fifteen years ago, there was an abandoned store building there. Several dwelling houses are there as is Mount Pisgah Methodist Church. It may be reached by going out Catalpa Street road. (--Personal observation.)

[13]

Nathalia

Nathalia was near Turners and Hays on the Memphis line of the Frisco Railroad. It was situated at Section 35, Twp. 29 N, Range 21 West. (--Map of Greene County, 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Mail via Turners. (--Rand, McNally, 1919.)

Needmore (earlier known as Wicksell)

Needmore was on the east and west road on which the natural gas line enters Springfield. It was at the intersection of South Golden Ave. There was a general store and post-office. It was about two and one-half miles west of South Campbell Ave. Road (Highway 160). It was near Weaver Store. Pastor Bud Moore, with his brother-in-law, Frank Mikesell, operated the store and post-office. In submitting a name for the post-office, Mikesell submitted his own name on the paper which was sent to the Post-Office Department. The "M" was mistaken for a "W"; hence the name "Wicksell."

Since the store was occasionally out of certain staples, someone facetiously dubbed the place, "Needmore." Thus the post-office received the name of Needmore. (--C. D. Utley; Charles Sheppard.) The post-office was discontinued in 1905 due to R. F. D. Mail via Springfield. (--General Scheme, p. 41.)

Needmore was situated at Section 21, Twp. 28 N, Range 22 West. (--Map of Greene County, 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Mentor

Mentor was situated at Section 23 & 24, Twp. 28 N, Range 21 West. In 1963 there was no store there; only a few houses. (--Gen. Highway Map of Greene County; phone call to Mrs. Betherum.)

Nichols Junction (Nichols)

See Junction City.

Nogo

Nogo was near Strafford. It was about six miles east of Springfield on the Frisco Railroad. Earlier, it had two stores, a blacksmith shop and a post-office. A friend of mine told me that once when he passed through Nogo on the train, he noticed a sign on one of the stores, Edde & Reser. He noticed that the sign spelled the same forward and back.

With the introduction of Centralized Train Control, the passing track at Nogo was removed in the late 1940's or early 1950's. Nothing remains at Nogo excepting a few foundation stones. The post-office was discontinued in 1905 due to R. F. D. Mail via Springfield. (--Personal observation; Miss Juliet Lee Vinton; Chief Dispatcher, Frisco Railroad.)

It was situated at Section 6, Twp. 29 N, Range 20 West. (--Map of Greene County, 1912, Rand, McNally.)

[14]

Palace (or Pallas)

It was situated at Section 19, Twp. 28 N, Range 20 West. (--Map of Greene County, 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Highway 60 runs on the north side of this section which is west of 125.

Palmetto

Palmetto, at one time, was a thriving community. It consisted of stores, a post-office, a school, and several dwellings. When Logan-Rogersville School Consolidated District was formed, eight school districts, including Palmetto, were merged. The post-office was discontinued and mail was via Springfield. In 1963, only the cemetery remained; a few people lived nearby. (--Rand, McNally, 1919; talk with Mrs. Fred Austin.)

It was situated at Section 11, Twp. 28 N, Range 20 West, south of Highway D, on the first road east of 125 near Webster Co. line.

Pearl

Pearl occupied the same place on the railroad once occupied by Asher (q. v.). It was the first station south of Harold on the Bolivar line of the Frisco Railroad. (--U. S. Geological Map, Springfield Sheet, 1886.)

Phenix (Phoenix)

At one time there were extensive marble quarries here, but they have been worked out. It was north of Ash Grove, near Walnut Grove, on the Kansas City, Clinton and Springfield R. R. (This railroad was abandoned ca. 1936.) (--Personal knowledge.)

It was situated at Section 35, Twp. 31 N, Range 24 West, south from Walnut Grove on Farm Road 43. (--General Highway Map of Greene County.)

Plano

At one time Plano had a casket factory, but it has been abandoned. Nothing remains excepting a filling station and the ruins of an old stone building (1968). (--Mrs. Homer Redfearn.)

It was situated at Section 27, 28, Twp. 29 N, Range 24 West, near Highway 174.

Provision

Provision was situated at Section 17, Twp. 28 N, Range 22 West. (--Map of Greene County, 1912, Rand, McNally.)

This area is south of Springfield and north of Lake Springfield, near Highway 60.

[15]

Republic

Republic is some fourteen miles southwest of Springfield. The first plat of what is now Republic was filed on the 8th of January, 1879, by William O'Neal. (--Fairbanks & Tuck, Vol. 1, p. 209.)

Republic is situated at Section 19 & 20, Twp. 28, Range 23 West at the junction of Highways 60 & 174.

Richland

Richland was in 2nd Robberson Township, north of Glidewell. It was on the original Bolivar Road (then called the State road.) The road, which was laid out by the State, is said to have been the first road regularly laid out in Greene County. It ran from Boonville, on the Missouri River, to Fayetteville in Arkansas. A post-office was formerly kept where James Headlee now lives (1883), and called Richland. (--Brinks-McDonough Atlas of Greene Co., p. 23.)

Ritter

The station was on the Bolivar line of the Frisco Railroad (across from the north end of Springfield Municipal Airport.) It seems likely that the town was some distance east of the station. At one time, a mill was in operation at the spring which is in a field back of Ritter School, which is on the old Bolivar Road. (The spring is on private property.) The water of this spring was a source of supply for the City of Springfield. The pumping station was adjacent to Highway 13. Pumping from this spring was stopped in December, 1957. (--Phone call to J. L. O'Quinn; phone call to Fulbright Pumping Station of City Utilities Water Department.)

The area around the pumping station has become a park in the park system of Springfield. (--Personal knowledge.)

It was situated at Section 6, Twp. 29 N, Range 23 West.

River Park

River Park was located in Wilson Township. It was situated at Section 25, Twp. 28 N, Range 22 West. Highway 160 goes on the west side of this section which is east of Battlefield. (--Map of Greene County, 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Roseville

Roseville was located in what is now the 3100 Block of North National Avenue in Springfield. The actual site is about two blocks east of North National. After one passes under I-44 underpass, a road may be noticed leading to the east, with a sign denoting Roseville Packing Plant. The hamlet consisted of a grocery store and a post-office. It flourished about 1912 to 1915. (--Phone call to Roseville Packing Plant; personal observation.)

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Rule

Earlier Gates: 1911; then Rule: 1917; finally Kissick: 1925. (--Maps of Mo., for those years, Rand, McNally.)

Sacville

Sacville is located on Highway Z north from Willard. In 1968 there was only a store and a garage. There were a few houses near the store, although several people in the vicinity say that they live in Sacville. (--Phone call to Sacville store.)

It is situated at Section 26, Twp. 31 N, Range 23 West. Rand, McNally, 1974, does not show any population for Sacville; the 1979 Telephone Directory does not show a store for this place.

Salyer

Salyer was a post-office situated at Section 33, Twp. 31 N, Range 22 West. This area is west of Highway 13, on the first north from WW. (--Map of Greene County, undated, at the Springfield Public Library.)

Sequiota

Sequiota once was a popular summer resort; also known as Fisher's Cave. Later it was a fish hatchery for the State of Missouri, now removed to Table Rock Lake. As of July 1, 1969, it became a part of the City of Springfield, due to extension of the city limits.

It is situated at Section 9, Twp. 28 N, Range 21 West. (Map of Greene County, undated.)

Springfield

Springfield, the county seat and metropolis of the Southwest, was settled in 1833, and laid off as a town by John Campbell in 1836, and incorporated as a city in 1847... (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 218.)

In 1834 came James Carter, the first blacksmith. The same year a post-office was established with Junius T. Campbell as postmaster; a semi-monthly mail was brought from the Little Piney post-office (Phelps County) on horseback. In 1836 the first frame house was built by Benjamin Cannefax and in 1837 the first brick were burned...In 1850 stage travel was opened to Boonville, Lebanon and Fayetteville...

The origin of the name is in dispute. It is generally contended that it was derived from the great spring at the foot of the hill and the plain on the summit, Spring-Field, but it is also said to have been named in honor of Springfield, Tenn., the home of Kindred Rose, one of the early settlers.

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The settlement then numbered about a score of cabins. February 19, 1838, the town was incorporated...The organization appears to have been practically inoperative, and for several years municipal affairs received little attention, elections being seldom held, and hold-over officers neglecting to serve. In February, 1846, the town was incorporated by the county court...In March, 18471 (sic) city organization was instituted with A. Maurice as mayor. After this elections were infrequent, and there was considerable disorder...

In 1870, North Springfield adjoining the city on the north was laid out...It was incorporated July 4, 1870...

In March, 1887, Springfield and North Springfield were consolidated as a third class city under the name of the former and comprising an area of five and three-quarters square miles...(--Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri, 1901, Conard, Vol. 6, pp. 45, 46.)

Stewart

Stewart was southwest of Galloway; mail was via Wilson Creek P. O. In 1919 the population was 9. (--Rand, McNally, 1919.)

Strafford

When the Frisco Railroad was built into Greene County in 1870 that company joined with the late John McCabe and located a town in Sections 3 & 4, in Township 29 N, Range 20 West and named it Strafford. The first store was kept by John Dunn, in 1870, who was the first postmaster.

Soon after Dunn's store was established, John Teverbaugh, a colored man, opened a blacksmith shop, the first in the place. Strafford was named for Strafford, Conn. (--Fairbanks & Tuck, Vol. 1, p. 209; Holcombe, p. 908.)

It is situated at the junction of I-44 and 125.

Thiell

This hamlet was near Galloway. No other information is available. (--Rand, McNally, 1919.)

Turners (or Turnersville)

This place is on the Kansas City-Birmingham line of the Frisco Railroad. In 1968, there was a store there. Several new dwellings had been built. (--Phone call to grocery store at Turners.)

It is situated at Section 29, 30, 31 & 32, Twp. 28 N, Range 20 West on Highway D, near James River.

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Walnut Forest

Walnut Forest, two miles north from Strafford was a pleasant village, containing several stores, a mill, church and school house, etc. (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Mo., p. 220.)

Joseph F. Danforth was postmaster in 1837. (--Wetmore's Gazetteer of the State of Missouri, 1837, p. 273.) This same gazetteer shows only two post-office in Greene County for 1837; the other being Springfield with J. P. Campbell, postmaster.

Wallis (pronounced Wally)

Wallis is a blind siding on the Missouri Pacific R. R., near Dayco Rubber Plant and Hoerner Box Company. (--Agent: Missouri Pacific R. R.)

Walnut Grove

Walnut Grove Township is the smallest civil township in the county. A grove, principally composed of walnut timber was known as the walnut grove from a very early period. Allen Williams came to the township in 1832, settled in Section Twenty-One, but afterwards moved to Texas. Joseph Moss settled where the town of Walnut Grove now is (Township 31 N, Range 24 West, Sections 14 & 15), but an improvement had been made there previous to his coming which Moss purchased.*

In the town of Walnut Grove, William H. Cook was one of the first settlers, and had a blacksmith shop where now (1915) stands the town. S. A. Edmonson was one of the first residents. Nelson Montgomery opened the first store. During pioneer times, it was widely known under the quaint name of "Possum Trot." (--Fairbanks & Tuck, Vol. 1, p. 209.)

*Map of Missouri, 1903, Geo. P. Cram, shows Walnut Grove as being on the Kansas City, Clinton & Springfield R. R.; on the same map, on the Frisco R. R. shows Walnut Grove Station or Buckley P. O.

Walnut Grove is located at the junction of Highways 123, F & BB.

White Oak Grove

White Oak Grove was in Clay Township. No other information is available. (--New Atlas of Missouri., 1874, Campbell, Map #34.)

Wilson Creek

Wilson Creek Post Office was situated at Section 25, Twp. 28 N, Range 23 West on the Christian County line. It was southwest from Battlefield. (--Gen. Highway Map of Greene County, 1-13-64.)

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Willard (earlier Robberson, q. v.)

Willard was laid out in 1884 by the late Dr. E. T. Robberson. It is located in Murray Township, 9 miles from Springfield, on the Bolivar line of the Frisco Railroad. It occupies a fine sightly location upon Grand Prairie, on Sections 23 & 26, Township 30 N, Range 23 West. Many beautiful homes are in or near Willard, at the junction of Highways 160, O, & Z. (--Fairbanks & Tuck, Vol. 1, p. 210; Gen. Highway Map.)

Robberson (later Willard, q. v.)

In 1884 Oscar Farmer named the village for an officer of the Frisco Railroad. At the coming of the railroad in 1884 Oscar Farmer opened a store and named it Robberson for the owner of the adjoining land. When he applied for a post-office under that name, it was refused as there was another office by that name already in the State. He then named it Willard.

(Robberson may also be spelled Robertson.) (--A Thesis: Place Names in the Southwest Counties of Missouri, Robert Lee Myers, 1930.)

Yeakley

Yeakley was in 3rd Center Township. It was situated at Section 28, Twp. 39 N, Range 23 West. Highway 174 runs through this section which is west of Republic. (--Map of Greene County, 1912, Rand, McNally.)

Greene County Table of Contents
Springfield-Greene County Library