A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Barton County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


[1]

Alston

Alston was located in Ozark Township, north of Mindenmines (Minden). (--Map of Missouri, 1925, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Ardath

Ardath was laid out and named by A. M. Bean, about 1910. He may have taken the name from Marie Corellis' novel, Ardath, published in 1889. (--Place Names.)

Ardath was in the northwest corner of the county in Le Roy Township, northwest of Liberal, on the Frisco Railroad. (--Map of Missouri, 1925, 1939, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Baker's Grove (later Fairbanks, q. v.)

Baker's Grove was named for the pioneer family of Bakers, who lived in a beautiful grove of oaks. (--Place Names.)

It was located in Union Township, Section 8, Township 33 N, Range 31 W. (--General Highway Map of Barton County, with the aid of New Atlas of Missouri, 1874, Campbell, Map #25.)

Barton (not to be confused with Barton City)

Barton was located in Barton City Township, at Section 29, Township 33 N, Range 32 W, near Highway 43. There is a cemetery shown on the map at this location; also, there is a cemetery in the adjoining section, No. 32. (--General Highway Map of Barton County, with the aid of New Atlas of Missouri, Map #25.)

Barton City (later Hannon, q. v.)

Barton City, established soon after the Civil War, was an old trading-point and got its name from Barton Co. (--Place Names.)

Beloit (Boston, Carleton Station)

Beloit was a station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, in Township 31 N, Ranges 30 and 31 W, in Richland Township, seven miles south of Lamar. It was laid out by A. Steetman, and the plat was filed July 25, 1881. W. H. Thompson and Dr. W. J. Spence were merchants there. Its former name was Carleton Station. The population was about 100 (1889). (--History of Barton County, 1889, p. 544.)

There are Beloits in six other states. It is possible that the store was named for Beloit, Wisconsin, as many people from the north settled in the county. (--Place Names.)

[2]

Boston (earlier Carleton Station, q. v.; then Beloit, q. v.)

Boston was named for Boston, Mass. (--Place Names.)

It is located at Sections 19 & 24, Township 31 N, Ranges 31 W and 30W, east of Highway 71. See History of Boston at the end of this directory.

The post-office was discontinued in June, 1971. Clipping from Springfield Leader and Press, June 11, 1971, or approximate date.

There were two other hamlets in Missouri named Boston. There was a small hamlet in Buchanan County, between 1837 and 1840, by this name. At one time it was thought Boston would become the chief town in that portion of the State. It was within a radius of five miles of St. Joseph. Nothing remains.

Boston was an early name for Aisle, Christian County. See A Directory of Christian County, by Moser, Jan. 1970, for details.

Burgess

The trading-point Burgess was named for a Kentuckian named Burgess, who was interested in the coal mines in this region. (--Place Names.)

It was founded in 1893. --George Leaker

It is located at Section 6, Township 32 N, Range 33 W, at the Missouri-Kansas line, near Mulberry, Kansas. It is north of Highway P, on the Kansas City Southern Railroad.

Bushnell

A post-office and store kept by Mr. Bushnell, whose family name has attached to the locality. (--History of Barton County, p. 543.)

A possible location is at Section 20, Township 32 N, Range 29 W, since some buildings are shown at this location on the map. (--General Highway Map of Barton County, issued by the State Highway Commission of Mo., 4-1-68. Unless otherwise noted all map descriptions are from this map.)

It was established by Andy and Sibyl (his sister) Bushnell about 1884, and took its name from them. (--Place Names.)

Caput

Caput was a village and post-office five miles northwest of Lamar. Possibly it was named by some Latin student, who wanted it to be the "head" of all the other places in the region. (--Place Names.)

It was located at Section 27, Township 33 N, Range 31 W. (--General Highway Map of Barton County, with the aid of New Atlas of Mo.)

[3]

Berry Hill (later Hell-On-The-Line, q. v.)

Berry Hill was laid out March 24, 1888, by Philo H. Sawyer. No reason for its name is known. (--Place Names.)

Berry Hill was in Township 31, Range 33 W, in the northwest part of Southwest Township, Section 18. (--History of Barton County, p. 544.)

Southwest Township is in the southwest part of the county. (--Map of Missouri, 1925, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Carleton Station

Carleton Station was the name for Beloit before 1881. No reason for the name is known. (--Place Names.)

See History of Boston.

Catalpa Park

Sometime after G. H. Walser had established Liberal (q. v.), he turned spiritualist, wrote a life of Christ, and established Catalpa Park, to which his Spiritualist friends could come from all parts of the country to worship. He called it Catalpa Park, because it was in a beautiful grove of Catalpas. (--Place Names.)

Coon Creek Post Office (later Midway, q. v.; then Dublin, q. v.)

Coon Creek was the name of a trading-point in the southern part of Barton Co., in the pioneer days. (--Place Names.)

It was located at Sections 11 & 12, Norfork Township, #30, Range 31 W. George Leaker and (--General Highway Map of Barton County, with the aid of New Atlas of Missouri, Map #25.)

Coon Creek (stream)

Coon Creek is a small stream rising near the Dade County line and flowing westward to Muddy Creek south of Lamar. It gets its name from the abundance of raccoons along its course. (--Place Names.)

Coon Creek Mill

Coon Creek Mill was named for Coon Creek (q. v.), on which it was located. (--Place Names.) (exact location is unknown).

[4]

Denison, North (later Liberal, q. v.)

North Denison was laid out in 1884 by A. Delissa, and is in the north part of the present town of Liberal (q. v.). It was probably named for Denison, Texas, because there was much trade between these two sections during this time. The suffix "north" is applied to its relative position. (--Place Names.)

Denison, South (later Liberal, q. v.)

South Denison was laid out in 1884 by R. C. Goss, and is the south part of the present town of Liberal. It was very likely named for Denison, Texas, as was North Denison (q. v.). The suffix "south" applies to its relative position of the place.

Denison

The towns of North and South Denison were laid out in 1884; the first by A. Delissa, and the second by R. C. Goss, and both are located in Township 32, Range 33 W, adjoining Liberal, in the northeast part of Ozark Township. The plats of both were filed on April 12, of the year mentioned. They form a growing, enterprising Christian community, and with good railway accommodations (the Gulf and the Nevada & Minden Lines both passing through them) bid fair to be a locality of importance. For railway purposes this point was called Pedro. The following merchants in different lines are: A. Delissa & Son, R. C. Goss, H. Bradshaw, P. A. Howe, Dr. J. S. Gish, C. Fritz and Mrs. D. J. Villard...

Following is a copy of the record of the incorporation of Denison, which was effected June 9, 1884:

"Now comes in to be heard a petition signed by two-thirds of the inhabitants and tax-payers of the town of Denison, asking that said town be incorporated as a village and police established for its local government, composed of the Denisons known and recorded as North and South Denison, in Barton County, Missouri, which is taken up and considered by the court...It is therefore ordered by the court that said petition be granted."

The following named were appointed trustees of the village of Denison, to serve until succeeded by others duly elected and qualified: R. J. Morris, J. T. Johnson, Pit Boulware, A. Feller, Wes. Stader.

A mineral has been discovered in Denison, which, upon assay, proves to contain large quantities of rich gold and silver ore. (--State of Missouri, Hist. of Barton Co., 1889, pp. 541, 542.)

[5]

Doylesport

Doylesport was a trading-point in the northeast part of the county. It was probably named for a Doyle family in the neighborhood, but the reason for suffixing "port" is not known. (--Place Names; Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 54.)

Dublin (earlier Coon Creek, q. v.; then Midway, q. v.)

Dublin was named by Mrs. Ira Gilson, a native of Ireland, for the city of that name in the "old country". (--Place Names.)

Dublin was a small town on the Missouri Pacific R. R., in Township 30, Range 31, in the southeast part of Richland Township, on the southern border of the county. It was formerly known by the name of Coon Creek. It was laid out by Nathan Bray, who filed the plat November 11, 1876. E. C. Moreland was the merchant and most prominent business man; population about 100 (1889). The plat of Moreland's Addition was filed April 8, 1880. (--State of Missouri, History of Barton County, 1889, p. 543.)

A possible location was at Section 12, Township 30 N, Range 31 W, since the map shows several buildings at this location near Highway 71.

Duval

Duval, established in 1871, is near Liberal. (--George Leaker, Reference Guide, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Ellsworth

Ellsworth was a post-office and store kept by J. S. Worthington. (Location is unknown.)

Esrom (Eshrom, sometimes called Farmersville)

Esrom, in Township 31, Range 31, in the western part of North Fork Township, was founded in 1880. It had one store, kept by William Outstatt. Lumber was manufactured here by William Moody. The village was eight miles distant southwest from Lamar. (--State of Missouri, History of Barton County, p. 545.)

It was 12 miles northeast of Nashville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 327.)

Esrom Post-Office was eight miles southwest of Lamar, beginning in 1880. It was very probably named for the Biblical name Esrom, an ancestor of Judah, mentioned in the genealogy of Christ (Luke 3:33). (Earlier called Farmersville, q. v.). (--Place Names.)

[6]

Farmersville (later Esrom, q. v.)

Farmersville was a name applied to Esrom for a time. It is in a good farming section, and that is probably the reason for the name, Farmersville. (--Place Names.)

Fairbanks (earlier Baker's Grove, q. v.)

Fairbanks, a later name for Baker's Grove, was named for a merchant there. (--Place Names.)

Forest Grove

Forest Grove, in Richland Township, was established in 1871. It was in Section 14. (--George Leaker.)

Golden City

Golden City was laid out by S. C. Brock, who filed its plat in the office of the County Recorder, April 6, 1870...It was incorporated February 21, 1881...In 1882 Golden City was organized as a city of the fourth class, J. A. Williamson being the first mayor, and B. Harry the first clerk...Laid out first in 1867, Golden City saw the erection of only one house (the store of B. & D. Appleby) on the old site, until, in 1869, the store and town site was changed from the timber south of where J. P. Wyatt's house now (1889) stands to the northwest corner of Section 35, where about twenty acres was platted, comprising the greater part of what is now (1889) known as "Old Town"...

In 1871, the unbroken prairie extended up to the town site, and westward almost without interruption to Dublin, a distance of twelve miles. (--State of Missouri, History of Barton County, pp. 531, 532.)

It is located at Sections 26, 27, 34 & 35, Township 21 N, Range 29 W, on Highways 37, 126 & 160, near the Dade Co. line.

Hannon (earlier Barton City, q. v.)

When Barton City got a post-office, it came under the name of Hannon. It was probably named from the family name of Hannon, a common Celtic name for O'Bannon, descended from Annon, which came from the river Annon in Scotland. (--Place Names.)

It is 6-1/2 miles north of Liberal and 6 miles south of Bronaugh (Vernon Co.), in Barton Township. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 327.)

It is located at Section 7, Township 33 N, Range 32 W, on Highway V, west of 43.

[7]

Hell-On-The-Line (earlier Berry Hill, q. v.)

Hell-On-The-Line is a nickname for Berry Hill, which was on the Kansas-Missouri line. In the days of dry Kansas and wet Missouri, many Kansas citizens came over to the Missouri town and drank and fought. (--Place Names.)

Hog Eye

The town with this whimsical name was south of Milford in Milford Township. (--George Leaker.)

Horse Creek (later Newport, q. v.)

For many years the trading-point at Newport was known as Horse Creek because it was located near Horse Creek (q. v.). (--Place Names.)

Horse Creek (stream--Dade County)

Horse Creek was named by the Government surveyors or travelers, who, in the 1830's found a dead horse near the banks of the stream. "My father and old settlers told me." W. F. Ringo. (--Place Names.)

Hornaday

It was northwest of Lamar on the Frisco R. R. (--Map of Missouri, 1925, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Iantha

Iantha was laid out by W. N. Wills of Lamar, July 25, 1861. The name Iantha is of classic origin, the daughter of Oceanus and Tethys. In modern times she appears in Sir William Davenant's "The Siege of Rhodes" and in Shelly's "Queen Mab". Byron dedicates "Childs Harold's Pilgrimage" to Iantha (his name for Lady Charlotte Harley, daughter of the Earl of Oxford). This little town was very likely named for some lady who had been named for Iantha. (--Place Names.)

It is northwest of Lamar, on the Frisco R. R. (--Map of Missouri, 1925, Rand, McNally & Co.)

It is located at Sections 13 & 14, Township 32 N, Range 32 W, on Highway W north of 160.

Irwin

It is 6-1/2 miles north of Lamar and 5 miles south of Sheldon (Vernon Co.). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 327.)

It is located at Sections 24 & 25, Township 33 N, Range 31 W, on Highway V, east of 71.

[8]

It was named for a local family who owned land there. (--Place Names; The State of Missouri, History of Barton County, p. 544.)

Joka

Joka was located at Section 9, Township 30 N, Range 30 W. (--General Highway Map of Barton County, with the aid of New Atlas of Missouri, Map #25.)

Kenoma

Kenoma is a small village in Township 31 N, Range 30 W, in the northeast part of Richland Township, six miles southwest of Lamar, on the line of the Gulf (Frisco) R. R. It was laid out by Barnabas Boggess, who filed the plat October 26, 1880, and that of Boggess' Addition, February 9, 1884...The merchants in 1889 were Shriner and Malone and James Bryan. Population was 150. (--The State of Missouri, History of Barton County, p. 545.

It is located at Sections 11 & 14, Township 31 N, Range 30 W, at the junction of Highways T & U.

Lamar

Lamar was laid out in 1846 by order of the county court on land owned by George E. Ward and his son-in-law, Joseph C. Parry. The town was named by Mrs. George E. Ward for an old Louisiana friend of hers, Mirabeau B. Lamar, who had been President of Texas. Place Names; How Missouri Towns, Counties and Streams were Named, 1st Article, p. 207, from a series of articles in Missouri Historical Review, David W. Eaton...

The original survey embraces forty to fifty acres. The plat was destroyed, with the other county records during the Civil War. The first business man, and for some years the most prominent one in Lamar, was George E. Ward...who was killed in battle during the Civil War. He built a corn and saw mill, and opened a store in a small log building...in the fall of 1852.

William H. McFarland opened a store on the west side of the square in 1858. He removed to California before the outbreak of the War. Jason Bruffly and Nathan Bray opened a store on the east side of the square in 1859 or 1860, and went out of business about 1862. William Bishop had a grocery in the town during the War. During the War, the town lost about all it had gained previously, the country round about was in a state of terror and disorder, half depopulated, and business was at a standstill...The first store was that of Van Pelt & Smedley, at the northeast corner of the square. (--The State of Missouri, History of Barton County, pp. 523, 524, 525.)

It is located at Sections 19, 31, 29, Range 30 W, and Sections 24, 25, Range 31 W, all in Township 31 N. It is located on Highways 71, 160, & KK.

It is the birth-place of Harry S. Truman.

[9]

Last Chance

Last Chance is the last station on the Frisco R. R., just inside of Missouri on the Missouri-Kansas line. It was so called in 1861 because it was the "last chance" to get a drink of whiskey when Kansas was dry and Missouri wet. (--Place Names.)

It was located at Section 19, Township 33 N, Range 33 W, at the crossing of the Kansas City Southern Railway, south of Highway K. (--Map of Barton County, with the aid of Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Le Roy

Le Roy, laid out by John Jones, January 12, 1875, was built one mile east and three-quarters south of the Oskaloosa site. No reason for the name is known. (--Place Names.)

Le Roy was laid out by John Jones, who filed the plat April 12, 1873. It is located in Township 33, Range 33, in the northwest part of Le Roy Township, near the line of the Gulf (now Frisco) R. R., twenty-five miles northwest of Lamar. J. M. Hawkins was a local merchant (1889). Population about 100.

It was located at Section 15 (or 22), Township 33 N, Range 33 W. (Two locations are shown in New Atlas of Missouri, Map #25.) (--General Highway Map of Barton County, with the aid of New Atlas of Missouri, Map #25.) (There is nothing there today--1975--although a few buildings are shown at this location.)

Liberal

Liberal is situated in the western part of Barton Co., on the Kansas & Texas (now Missouri-Pacific R. R.) and the K. C. F. S. & M. (now Frisco) R. R. For a fuller discourse on the founding of Liberal, the reader is invited to read State of MO., Hist. of Barton Co., 1889, Goodspeed, pp. 536, 537, 538. "Old Liberal" was originally laid out by M. N. Wills. The town plat as now known was filed by G. H. Walser, October 30, 1880. The town was incorporated by an order of the county court, November 7, 1881, but upon representation that the petition had not been signed by two-thirds of the taxable inhabitants within the limits described, the order was revoked November 12, 1881. The town was re-incorporated Monday, March 3, 1884, by an order of the county court. (--State of Missouri, History of Barton County, p. 539.)

It was named to reflect the sentiments of its inhabitants. "We do not prescribe a belief for anyone, nor do we measure a person by his faith. Every one is judged by his own standards and manly worth." (--How Missouri Towns, Counties and Streams were Named, 1st Article, p. 207, from a series of articles in Missouri Historical Review, David W. Eaton.)

It is located at Sections 1 & 2, Township 32 N, Range 33 W, at the junction of Highways K & NN, west of 43.

[10]

Liberal (earlier Denison, North and South, q. v.)

When G. H. Walser came in 1881 he laid off a new town on the east, adjacent to North Denison and South Denison and named it Liberal. The name is an embodiment of his view. The following quotation, from his historical account, taken from one of his pamphlets (not named and now unobtainable) shows the reason for the name:

"The reason we started the town was that it was apparent to all that no person could live in a Christian community and express an honest opinion regarding the Christian religion adverse to the interest of the priestcraft without regarding his business and social standing"..."With one foot upon the neck of the priestcraft, and the other upon the rock of truth, we have thrown our banner to the breeze and challenged the world to produce a better cause, for the devotion of man, than that of a grand, noble, and better community"...
"Bound to no creed, no sect confined,
The world our home, our brethren all mankind."
"No god, no devil, no hell, no heaven."

In 1894 North and South Denison united with Liberal and petitioned the county court for incorporation under the name of Liberal. (--Place Names.)

Malta (spelled Maltz on 1910 map)

Malta, a trading-point six miles east and one mile north of Dublin, was established in 1870 and continued for several years. The reason for borrowing the name of the famous Mediterranean island name is not known. (--Place Names.)

It was south of Kenoma. (--George Leaker.)

Midway (earlier Coon Creek, q. v.; finally Dublin, q. v.)

As Carthage and Lamar became prosperous towns, Coon Creek took on the name of Midway because of its position with reference to these towns. (--Place Names.)

Milford

Milford is an incorporated village in Township 33 N, Range 29 W, in thet west part of Milford Township, which was laid off by Charles Milford Wilcox, who filed the plat November 15, 1869...It is 12 miles northeast of Lamar, its most accessible shipping and banking point. It contains several general stores, some small mechanics shops and a flour mill. Its merchants in different lines, were R. D. Wooldridge, J. B. Vaughn, Clayton Rogers, R. L. Bates, and J. M. Herlocker (1889). (--The State of Missouri, History of Barton County, p. 541.)

It was named for the middle name of its founder, C. M. Wilcox. (--Place Names.)

[11]

It is located at Sections 19 & 20, Township 33 N, Range 29 W, at the junction of Highways KK & C.

Mindenmines

Mindenmines is a station on the Nevada and Chetopa, Kans. branch of the Missouri Pacific R. R., and a branch of the Gulf (now Frisco) R. R., in Township 31 N, Range 33 W, near the north border of Southwest Township. It is the business center and shipping-point of a cluster of coal mines in Southwest and Ozark Townships. It was laid out by R. J. Tucker, and its plat was filed April 19, 1883. Charles H. Morgan, the Inter-State Commercial Co., J. M. Dickerson, H. Nelson, Usher Bros., Stroud Bros., and William A. Frazier had stores there; population about 350 (1889)...Mindenmines was incorporated December 28, 1885. (--The State of Missouri, History of Barton County, p. 543.

Mindenmines (earlier Minden, q. v.)

Soon after the town of Minden was laid out its name was changed to Mindenmines because the mail got mixed up with that of Mendon in Christian Co. The suffix was added because the chief occupation of the local inhabitants was coal mining. (--Place Names.)

It is located at Sections 5 & 6, Township 31 N, Sections 31 & 32, Township 32 N, Range 33 W, on Highway 160, west of M.

Minden (later Mindenmines, q. v.)

The town was laid out by Captain J. R. Tucker, March 19, 1883. There are many Germans in this neighborhood, and it is quite likely that they brought the name with them. Minden, a city in Prussia, is about forty miles west of Hanover. (--Place Names.)

Morerod

Morerod was a little coal camp owned by Keith and Perry of Kansas City about 1880. It was named for a local land owner, E. R. Morerod. (--Place Names.)

Morgan Camp

Morgan Camp was located in Section 18. Ozark Township. (--George Leaker.)

Nashville Center

Nashville Center was laid out one mile south of old Nashville (q. v.), and probably inherited its name. (--Place Names.)

Nashville

Nashville was platted by Thomas and Squire Baker, January 28, 1869. A town of the same name was laid out in Boone County, but later was swept into the Missouri River. It was named for the capital of Tennessee. (--How Missouri Towns, Counties and Streams were Named, by David W. Eaton, from a series of articles in Missouri Historical Review, p. 207.)

Nashville was a village of about 200 souls, in Township 30 N, Range 32 W, in the southeast part of Nashville Township...The plat of Nashville Center, a part of the same town, was filed by John Main, April 19, 1870; that of the west addition to Nashville Center, July 25, 1883. Judge Main built a store there in 1867. The second store was kept by Marion Dale, and the third by John Byer. (--The State of Missouri, History of Barton County, 1889, p. 544.)

The present population of Nashville is 100 and the mail is by way of Oronogo, Jasper, Co. It is located at Sections 5 & 6, Township 30 N, Range 32 W, on Highway 43.

Newport

The settlement here was formerly called Horse Creek. The town was laid off by Miles Boord, and the plat was filed June 24, 1874. The plat of Griffin's first addition was filed July 25, 1879. Merchants there were A. Spence & Co., William Stout and Ash & Polly. Population about 100 (1889). (--The State of Missouri, History of Barton County, pp. 544, 545.)

It is located at Section 10, Townshipo 32 N, Range 29 W, on Highway BB, west of F. (No population is shown for today).

Oak Grove (later Oakton, q. v.)

Oak Grove, a trading-point and post-office, got its name from a beautiful grove of oaks in which it was located. It was changed to Oakton in 1895. (--Place Names.)

Oakton (earlier Oak Grove, q. v.)

The post-office at Oak Grove had to be changed in 1895 because there was another Missouri post-office by that name. The name was simply altered to retain the old idea under another form. (--Place Names.) (In 1974, Mail through Lamar).

It is located at Sections 8 & 9, Township 31 N, Range 31 W, on Highway Z.

Old Irwin

Old Irwin was two miles south of present Irwin. (--George Leaker.)

[13]

Oskaloosa

Oskaloosa is an old trading-point near the place where the Frisco crosses the Missouri-Kansas line. It was named by people from Iowa, for their old home town. (--Place Names.) It is located at Section 7, Township 33 N, Range 33 W, on Highway K.

Pedro

The railroad company gave this name as the station at Liberal (q. v.), and printed it this way for a few years. The town never did bear the name. The source of the name is unknown. (--Place Names.)

Reber

It was located midway between Arcadia, Kans., and Liberal on the Frisco R. R. (--Map of Missouri, 1925, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Store

It was located on Section 20, Township 31 N, Range 20 W. (--New Atlas of Missouri, with the aid of General Highway Map of Barton County.)

Summitt Post-Office

Summitt was on a high point in the hills along Horse Creek. It got its name from its location. (--Place Names.)

Tail Holt

It was located in Section 6, of Union Township. (--George Leaker.)

Verdella Post-Office

This is probably a feminine Christian name, like Iantha. It is not uncommon in Southwest Missouri. (--Place Names.)

It is on the R. F. D. from Liberal. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 327.)

Verdella is a post-office village, known also as Barton Center, located in the center of Barton City Township, sixteen miles northwest of Lamar and eight miles northeast of Liberal. Merchants here were Fletcher and Brown. Population about 150 (1889). (--The State of Missouri, History of Barton County, p. 544.)

It was also known as Hammertown. (--George Leaker.)

It is located at Sections 16, 18, 21 & 22, Township 33 N, Range 32 W, on Highway FF, in Barton City Township.

[14]

Vernon

Vernon was north of Mindenmines, in Township 32, Section 30, Range 33 W. Sectional (--Map of Missouri, 1894, Rand, McNally & Co., with the aid of General Highway Map of Barton County.)

Vincent

Vincent was southeast of Liberal on the Frisco Railroad, in Central Township. It was located at Township 32 N, Range 32 W, Section unknown, east of Highway 43. (--Map of Missouri, 1925, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Wimmer

Wimmer was located southeast of Liberal in Center Township. It was located at Township 32 N, Range 32 W, Section unknown, east of Highway 43. (--Map of Missouri, 1925, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Wise

Wise, a post-office established soon after the Civil War, was named for a resident. (--Place Names.)

It was located in the southeast corner of Milford Township, which is the northeast township, in Section 4, Township 32 N, Range 29 W, on Highway CC. (--Map of Missouri, 1925, Rand, McNally & Co., with the aid of Map of Barton County.)

It was established in 1874, in Section 4, of Milford Township. (--George Leaker.)


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