A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Benton County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


[1]

Argus

In 1837, when the question of establishing a county seat arose, several sites were proposed. After the site of Warsaw was selected, the county clerk, Thomas Bishop, opposed the change and induced enough signers to withdraw from the petition to kill the movement. The case went into the courts, but was defeated. Then William L. Vaughn, who had a store about a mile east of the chosen site, made a vigourous effort to move it to his place. He called his prospective town Argus, but the movement failed. (--History of Benton County, p. 477.)

Avery

This village is situated on the line between the counties of Hickory and Benton, in Section 9, Township 38 N, Range 22 W. The first stock of goods brought therewas opened by Wright & Rash, February 10, 1890. This store was opened in one room of George W. Wright's residence, about one mile East of the present (1907) site of the village. Sometime in the summer of 1889, a Post Office at the residence of John M. Breshears, was established and he was appointed the first Postmaster. This was on the Benton County side of the line. It was kept there about a year, when George W. Wright was appointed Postmaster, and the office was moved over into Hickory County to Mr. Wright's store. John A. Breshears was later appointed Postmaster, and moved the office over into Benton County. About 1907 William A. Byrum built the first store building on the present (1907) site, and was appointed Postmaster, and the Post Office was again moved to Hickory County. A little later Thomas Heath, then doing business at Cross Timbers built a store house a little over in Benton County. He put in a stock of goods with John A. Jones as manager, which later was burned. One store is all there has ever been on this site, on the Hickory County side of the line. As of 1907 there were at least two stores there (on the Benton County side of the line), as well as a blacksmith shop. (--State of Missouri, History of Hickory County, 1907, Wilson, pp. 50, 51.)

Avery was located at Sec. 4 & 5, Twp. 38 N, R 22 W, north of the Hickory County line on Highway B (extended). (--Missouri Manuals, 1901-02, p. 381.) Avery was in Hickory Co. 1909-10, p. 573, it was in Benton Co.; 1919-20, it was in Hickory Co., p. 723.

Maps of Mo., 1910, it was in Benton Co.; 1925, it was in Hickory Co.; 1939, it was in Hickory Co.

According to the General Highway Map of Benton County, 10-1-69, Avery was in Benton Co.

It is no longer listed. (--Standard Reference Guide of Missouri, Rand, McNally & Co., 1972.)

[2]

Bentonville

It was 6 miles southwest of Fairfield, or 14 miles southwest of Warsaw. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Walter Williams, p. 331.)

It was on the Section line between Sec. 28, 23, 27 & 34, Twp. 39 N, R 23 W. (--General Highway Map of Benton County, issued by The Missouri State Highway Department, 10-1-69. Unless otherwise noted, all map descriptions are from this map.)

Bishop's Store

The first white men to settle in what is now Benton County were John F. Hogle, a German, and Narcisse Pensineau, a Frenchman...Hogle has his name perpetuated in Hogle Creek. It was at the mouth of this creek that Hogle and Pensineau established a trading-post. It cannot be ascertained what year they came, but it was long before the earliest pioneer settlers followed them into the wilderness...They fixed their trading-post at the mouth of this creek, where was the largest Indian village in what is now Benton County. This was the first white settlement and theirs was the first store. In 1832 Thomas J. Bishop, the first county and circuit clerk, came as a clerk for Hogle...Eventually he succeeded to the ownership of the trading-post, and for some time the only point of supplies for many miles was "Bishop's Store", as the place was called. The store was discontinued in 1838, soon after the Indians left. (--History of Benton County, p. 464.)

Apparently it was in Sec. 34, Twp. 38 N, R 23 W. (--New Atlas of Missouri, 1874, Campbell, Map #23, with the aid of General Highway Map of Benton County.)

Bledsoe's Ferry

In the latter part of 1831, Lewis Bledsoe settled on the Osage River about half a mile above Warsaw, on the old Military Road from Palmyra to Springfield, and established a ferry...In a short time a man named Yeager opened a store at Bledsoe's Ferry. (--History of Benton County, p. 464.)

Boeschenville

Boeschenville was in the northeast part of the county. Here Herman C. Boeschen had a store, and a blacksmith shop and wagon shop were kept by Henry Weinberg. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.)

Brauersville

Brauersville was a post-office. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.) (Location is unknown)

[3]

Brandon

Brandon is located at Sec. 14, Twp. 43 N, R 23 W, on the Pettis County line.

Chapman

Chapman was a post-office. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.) (Location is unknown)

Cloverdale

Cloverdale was a post-office 14 miles northwest of Warsaw. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 61.)

Apparently it was located at Sec. 6, Twp. 42 N, R 22 W. (--New Atlas of Missouri, Map #23, with the aid of General Highway Map of Benton County.)

Cole Camp

The first settler where is now Cole Camp was Hosea Powers; it is supposed about the year 1839...In 1846 V. G. Kemper...set up a store near Hosea Powers...Other stores were established in a short time. One of the early post-offices in the county had been opened at Ezekiel Williams' on Cole Camp Creek, a short distance from Hosea Powers. The post-office was soon moved after the stores were opened to the new place and carried with it its former name of Cole Camp. Hon. James H. Lay gives as his impression that the "Camp" part of the name, if not all of it, comes of the fact that the Coles of Cooper County had camped on the creek, watering stock, or hunting and exploring the county. (--History of Benton County, p. 509.)

Cole Camp, 20 miles northeast of Warsaw, on the O. U. & S. K. R. R., was laid out by Blakey & Brother in 1857. It had 1 church, 1 hotel, 5 stores and 1 flouring and 1 saw-mill (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 61.)

It is located at Sec. 25, 26, 35 & 36, Twp. 43 N, R 21 W, on Highways J, B, F & 52.

Crest

Crest was southwest of Nay and Cole Camp, on the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific R. R. (--Map of Missouri, 1925, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Crockerville

Crockerville was located at Sec. 36, Twp. 43 N, R 20 W, on an extension of Highway W, north of 52.

[4]

Dell Delight

Dell Delight south of Warsaw 6 miles contained a store by John Cochran. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.)

Dell Delight, also known as Dell, was a post-office 7 miles southeast of Warsaw. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 61.)

On the map, page 331 of The State of Missouri, in 1904, it is shown simply as Dell.

A possible location was at Sec. 2 & 3, Twp. 39 N, R 22 W, on Highways 65 & 7, since several buildings are shown on the map at this location.

Duroc

Duroc was on Sec. 17, Twp. 40 N, R 20 W. It became a platted town in 1847...Buford Bybee kept the ferry and J. W. Bybee had a store. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.)

Duroc was a post-office 17 miles east of Warsaw. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 61.)

It was 8 miles east of Fredonia, on the Osage River. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

Edmonson

It is 11 miles southeast of Lincoln. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

It is located at Sec. 22 & 23, Twp. 41 N, R 21 W, on Highway H.

Edmonson is 15 miles from Warsaw, on the Linn Creek Road; it had a store by John H. Smith. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.)

Edwards

Edwards had two stores...and a blacksmith shop. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.)

It is 6 miles southeast of Hockman, 6 miles southwest of Knobby, which in turn, was 6-1/2 miles northwest of Climax Springs (Camden Co.). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

Edwards is located at Sec. 7, R 20 W; Sec. 1 R 21 W, all in Twp. 39 N, on Highway 7, west of DD.

Fairfield

Fairfield on the Pomme de Terre River, 8 miles south of Warsaw contained 2 stores and grist-mills. Population (1874) about 75. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 61.)

[5]

Three free Negroes were the first settlers in this part of Benton County. Of the early white settlers was George Alexander, afterward a member of the county court...As early as 1836 Judge George Alexander obtained a ferry license on the Pomme de Terre, on the old State road. Mr. Harris and Mr. Campbell laid off a town on their farm, had a post-office and called the new town Fairfield. This was on the opposite side of the river, and about a mile south of the present (1889) town. Alexander's ferry was near his house...below where the bridge now (1889) stands. A mill was built, and a bridge was contracted by the county court, October 18, 1843, to be put up at the mill. Work was commenced, and progressed considerably, when on petition of the citizens, it was changed to Fairfield...March 15, 1869, Fairfield was platted and made a village by C. B. Cunningham. (--History of Benton County, p. 508.)

Fargo

Fargo was a post-office in 1901-02. (--Missouri Manual, p. 385.) (Location is unknown)

Fort Lyon

At Fort Lyon McMillian & Bumpass had a store. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.)

Fort Lyon was a post-office 19 miles northwest of Warsaw and 8 miles south of Windsor. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 62.)

It was on R. F. D. from Windsor through Yolo (Henry Co.) and on to Santiago. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

A possible location was at Sec. 7, Twp. 43 N, R 23 W, on the extension of Highway HH, west of Santiago.

Fredonia

Fredonia was 8 miles east of Warsaw, on Turkey Creek. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

A possible location was at Sec. 28, Twp. 40 N, R 21 W, at the junction of Highway FF and an extension of V, west of M.

Fristoe #1

Markham Fristoe was doorkeeper to the Missouri Legislature in 1834, and while there he had an act passed to locate and establish a State road from Jefferson City to Springfield, and to cross the Osage River at at place at that time only known as Fristoe's ferry. At that time Pettis County extended to the Osage on the north and Greene County on the south. Before the county seat was located Mr. Fristoe, on account of sickness in his family and among his servants, moved three-fourths of a mile east of the ferry, and built a large house where the first circuit court was held in the county by Judge Allen. Ringo & Joplin built a store close by and others built houses on the edge of the prairie. Several stores, a number of houses and blacksmith shops were erected, which made quite a village. The county was then organized, and the county seat was located at a point on the river about three-fourths of a mile from Mr. Fristoe's residence, and named Warsaw. Hendson Fristoe...was one of the men who helped to raise the first court house, which was constructed of logs and about 20 x 30 feet long, as well as he can remember... (--History of Benton County, p. 710.)

[6]

Fristoe #2

It is 14 miles southeast of Warsaw, or 9 miles northwest of Cross Timbers (Hickory County). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

It is located at Sec. 19, Twp. 39 N, R 21 W, at the junction of Highways 65 & CC.

It was named for Judge Markham Fristoe, a member of the county court of Benton Co., and an early settler. (--How Missouri Towns, Counties and Streams were Named, 1st. Article, p. 211, 1916, David W. Eaton.)

Garrett's Mill

Garrett's Mill, 3-1/2 miles northeast of Warsaw, did a large business in sawing, planing, hub and spoke manufacturing, etc. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 62.)

Gibson

Gibson contained R. M. Dickson's store (1889). (--History of Benton County, p. 512. (Location is unknown).

Hastain

Hastain is south of Duroc, on Deer Creek. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

Hastain had a store, a saw and grist-mill. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.)

It is located at Sec. 31, 32, Twp. 40 N, R 21 W, on Highway V, east of M.

Heimsath's Store

See Lake Creek.

[7]

Hockman

Hockman had a store of which C. W. Gist was a proprietor. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.) (Location is unknown).

Ionia

Ionia is located at Sec. 14, Twp. 43 N, R 22 W, on Highway P, on the Pettis County line.

Knobby (known as Knobby Creek Camp)

Knobby is known as Knobby Creek Camp. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.)

It is located at Sec. 2, 3, Twp. 39 N, R 20 W, on Highway DD, north of 7, west of Camden Co. line.

Kreizel's Mill

It was a post-office 15 miles northeast of Warsaw. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 62.)

Lake Creek

Lake Creek (Heimsath's Store) was a post-office 24 miles northeast of Warsaw. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 62.)

Lake Creek was in the northeast corner of the county, 5-1/2 miles east of Mora. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331; History of Benton County, p. 512.)

It was located at Sec. 9, Twp. 43 N, R 20 W, on Highway DD, west of the junction with Y.

Lakeview Heights

Lakeview Heights is on the north side of the Lake of the Ozarks at the junction of Highways H & AB, at Sec. 5, Twp. 40 N, R 20 W.

Leslie

Leslie was in the southeast corner of the county, near Hickory County line. (--New Atlas of Missouri, Map #23.)

Apparently it was in Sec. 2, Twp. 38 N, R 21 W, on Highway VV south of AA.

Lincoln

Lincoln, 13 miles north of Warsaw and 15 miles southeast of Windsor (Henry Co.), had 3 stores, 1 saddle-tree manufactury, and 1 grist mill. Population (1874) about 100.

It is located at Sec. 26, 27, Twp. 42 N, R 22 W, on Highways 65 & C.

[8]

Lincoln is on the Sedalia, Warsaw & Southern R. R., and was the originating point of the R. F. D. to Palo Pinto. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

Lincoln became an incorporated village in 1869. It had a population of nearly 300 (1889). The first settler was Wily Vincent...He opened a tavern on the old stage route, that became a noted place...Mr. Lohman was the first merchant...In 1889 the town contained general stores, hardware stores, saddlers, drug store, furniture store, merchant mill, hotel and livery, blacksmiths, wagon-shop. Mr. Vincent's first location was considerably south; then he settled north, the latter move being a little north of the old town. (--History of Benton County, pp. 510, 511.)

Lively (See Knobby Creek Camp)

Lively is 5-1/2 miles southeast of Duroc. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

Apparently it is in Sec. 24, Twp. 39 N, R 20 W, on Highway 7, near the Camden Co. line.

Mora

Mora is in the northeast corner of the county, near the Pettis County line, on the Sedalia, Warsaw & Southern R. R. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

Mora was platted by the railroad in 1882. It was a flag station. Peter E. Holtzen had a store. The trade was chiefly ties. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.)

It is located at Sec. 2, Twp. 43 N, R 21 W, on Highway U south of Pettis County line.

Mount Hulda

Mount Hulda was located at Sec. 6, Twp. 41 N, R 20 W, west of Highway B.

Mount View

Mount View was 13 miles southeast of Warsaw and had 1 general store. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 62.)

It was in Frisco Township. (--New Atlas of Missouri, Map #23.)

Mount View was platted and laid off in April, 1866. It had three general stores...and a steam flour-mill. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.)

Apparently it was in Sec. 5, Twp. 38 N, R 21 W. (--New Atlas of Missouri, Map #23, with the aid of Gen. Highway Map of Benton Co.)

[9]

Nay

Nay was on the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific R. R., east of the Cole Camp branch of the Missouri Pacific R. R. It was in William Township. (--Map of Missouri, in 1925, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Palopinto (Palo Pinto)

It is east of Lincoln from which point it is served by R. F. D. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 221.)

Palo Pinto was a trading-point of some importance, and had two stores. Grange Hall was located at this point. (--History of Benton County, p. 512.)

It is located at Sec. 34, Twp. 42 N, R 23 W, near the junction of Highways C & T.

Mrs. Ramona Heinrich, librarian of Henry County Library, said that Yolo in Henry County was across the road from Palo Pinto, Benton Co. Maps of Missouri, 1910, 1925, Rand, McNally & Co., show Palo Pinto to be in Henry County. Missouri Manual, 1901-02, shows Palo Pinto to be in Benton Co., p. 390. Yolo was a post-office in Henry Co., according to the same Missouri Manual, p. 394.

Passo

It was a post-office in 1901-02. (--Missouri Manual, p. 390.)

It was in Lindsay Township. (--Map of Missouri, p. 1910.)

Poplar

Poplar was 2-1/2 miles northeast of Schuyler. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

It was located at Sec. 22, Twp. 41 N, R 22 W, on Highway 65 south of Lincoln.

Racket

Racket is 6 miles south and west of Passo. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

It is located at Sec. 32, Twp. 41 N, R 23 W, on Highway 7 near the Henry County line.

Raymond

It was 6 miles southwest of Cole Camp on the Sedalia, Warsaw & Southern R. R. (Missouri Pacific branch to Sedalia). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

[10]

Santiago

Santiago was on R. F. D. east of Fort Lyon. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

It was located at Sec. 15, 16, Twp. 42 N, R 23 W, on Highway T, south of HH.

Schuyler

Schuyler was on the Missouri Pacific branch from Sedalia, 2-1/2 miles from Poplar and 6-1/2 miles south of Lincoln. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

Apparently, it was located in Sec. 33, Twp. 41 N, R 22 W, on Highway 65.

"Shipton's Mill" (Shiptonsburg)

On Indian Creek was John Shipton. He built the first mill in this part of the county, and it was a noted place for years, as it supplied the surrounding northern country for many years. The place was once platted in 1841. It was made a village, with the serious intention of becoming a village. It was John Shipton's Mill, and was always known by this name better than any other. The town passed away, and the property became that of Claus Stilges. (--History of Benton County, pp. 456, 511, 512.)

Tackner

Tackner was 5 miles west of Warsaw; 8 miles east of Finey (Henry Co.) (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

It ws located at Sec. 23, 24, Twp. 40 N, R 23 W, at the junction of Highways 7 & KK.

Tahoma

Tahoma was northeast of Lincoln, on Missouri Pacific R. R. (--Map of Missouri, 1925, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Warsaw

Warsaw, the county seat on the left bank of the Osage River, is 38 miles from Sedalia and 24 miles from Windsor (on the M. K. & T. R. R.). It had a population of (1874) about 500, contained 2 churches, 1 hotel, 1 public school-house, 1 bank, 15 stores, 1 carding machine, 1 flouring and 1 saw-mill and 2 newspapers...(--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 62.)

Warsaw was fixed and named, January 1, 1838...The first sale of lots in the place was February 15 of that year. The lone settler on the spot was Stephen A. Howser. Before the existence of Warsaw, the trading place at Bledsoe's Landing--called Osage--was doing a very prosperous assortment of wind work, to make that the future great city of the Osage Valley. According to Westmore's Gazetteer, of 1836, the place was in preparation to have a vast seminary (to be conducted by an "Eastern graduate") with Massachusetts school-marms galore, a great hotel, mills, saw and grist, warehouses, heavy forwarding and commission merchants, etc.; all were on paper, and promised as sure to follow the place being Benton County's seat of justice. "A population of several thousand in the next five years" was one of the contingent certainties. This last sentence in the Gazetteer's account of the place was at least true: "The country around is full of lead mines."

[11]

Adamson Cornwall was the first merchant in the place, first postmaster, etc...Around 1861, and some years before, as many as seven large steamboats had been at the same time at the wharf, loading and unloading...Warsaw was incorporated by order of the county court, July 6, 1840... (--History of Benton County, pp. 499, 500, 501, 503.)

It is located at Twp. 40 N, R 23 W, several sections, on Highways 7 & 65, at the head of The Lake of the Ozarks, Truman Dam is located above Warsaw on Osage River.

Whitakerville

Whitakerville is located at Sec. 28, Twp. 40 N, R 22 W, on Highway 83, southwest of 65.

Wisdom

Wisdom was 6 miles west of Fairfield, on Boyle's Creek. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

It was located at Sec. 3, Twp. 39 N, R 23 W, west of Highway O, near the St. Clair Co. line.

Yolo (also known as Palo Pinto)

Evidently it is a store just across the road which divides Benton and Henry Counties. "Fifty years ago I knew the place as Palo Pinto. A new building has replaced the first one, and the sign on the front of the building is now 'Yolo'. It is in Benton County." (--Mrs. Ramona L. Heinrich, Librarian, Henry County Library.)

Yolo is shown to be in Henry County, south of Windsor, from which point it was served by R. F. D. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

It was north of Roseland, in Springfield Twp. (--Map of Missouri, 1910.)

Zora (Old Zora)

It is near the Morgan County line, 1-1/2 miles from Riverview and 5 miles south of Boyler's Mill (both of which are in Morgan County). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 331.)

It is located at Sec. 35, Twp. 40 N, R. 20 W.


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