A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Cole County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


[1]

Bass

Bass was southwest of Osage Bluff. (--Sectional Map of Cole County, 1894, Rand, McNally.)

Belleville

Belleville was located on the southeast quarter of southeast quarter of Sec. 4, Twp. 43 N, Range 14 West and was surveyed for John L. Chambers in November, 1870. (--Hist of Cole Co., p. 304.) There is a Belleville in Jasper Co. (--Rand, McNally Ref. Guide of Mo., 1974, referred to as Rand, McNally.) This area is west of Russellville, and county Highways HH & C intersect. (--General Highway Map of Cole Co. Unless otherwise noted, all map locations are from this map.)

Brazito

Brazito is west of Osage Bluff. (--Sec. Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.) It is 15 miles southwest of Jefferson City, and had 1 schoolhouse and a store. (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, p. 167.) It is situated at Sec. 25, Twp. 43 N, Range 13 West on Highway 54. Mail via Jefferson City. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Centre Town (elevation 848 feet) (now Centretown)

Centre Town was surveyed by William Vogdt in 1867, and acknowledged by William S. Freshour...The townsite was first occupied in 1852, by Judge Freshour, who erected his house north of the railroad...Judge Freshour opened the first store...Gatliff & Weaver's store was also opened, but during the (Civil) War, Federal troops carried away the stock...(--Hist. of Cole Co., p. 300.) Centre Town, 15 miles west of Jefferson City, had several stores, 1 wagon shop, and a large flouring mill...It had 1 church, 1 school house and a population of 300. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 167. It is situated at Sec. 25, Twp. 45 N, Range 14 West at the junction of Highways 50 & NN.

Choteau

Choteau at the mouth of Little Tavern, on the Osage, was a prospective city of long ago (from 1889). Gen. Minor, one of the owners and one of the surveyors of the plat, was the first and only settler. A lot was donated to him by the owners, but the mosquitoes drove him out. (--Hist. of Cole Co., p. 304.)

[2]

Clark's Fork

Clark's Fork was located in Twp. 43 N, Range 13 West. (--Hist. of Cole Co., p. 204.) (Section is unknown.) Clark's Fork is now in Cooper County. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Cole Junction

Cole Junction was situated at Sec. 27, Twp. 45 N, Range 12 West on Highway 41 north of 50.

Decatur

Decatur was east of Enon. (Enon is in Moniteau Co.). (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.) Decatur, Cole Co., was named in 1820 for Capt. Stephen Decatur (1799-1820) who won fame in the Tripolitan War. (--Our Storehouse of Mo., Place Names, Ramsay, p. 61.) There was a Decatur in Cape Girardeau Co. (--Our Storehouse of Mo. Place Names, Ramsay.) Decatur is no longer listed in either county. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Elston (elevation 687 feet)

Elston was surveyed by W. Vogdt in 1867, for A. M. Elston, who acknowledged the plat March 29, 1867...The founder was commissioned justice of the peace in 1832, and in centennial years was the senior Justice of Missouri in point of service...(--Hist. of Cole Co., p. 302.) Elston, 10 miles west of Jefferson City, had several stores and shops and 1 saw-mill. Lead was found near the town and coal was mined within a short distance. It had 1 church and a schoolhouse. Population, 1874, about 200. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 167.) It is situated at Sec. 35 & 26, Twp. 45 N, Range 13 West on Highway T, north of 50.

Eugene (elevation 790 feet)

Eugene is in the southwest corner of the county and is situated at Sec. 30, Twp. 42 N, Range 13 West on Highway 17 south of BB.

Ewing

Ewing was on the Missouri River between Jefferson City and Osage City. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.) Ewing is no longer listed in Cole County; there is a town by the name of Ewing in Lewis County. (--Standard Ref. Guide of Mo., 1974, Rand, McNally.)

[3]

Gray's Creek

Gray's Creek was named by the pioneer, John Colgan, who lost an old gray mare in the fall and found her there in the spring in good condition. (Years were not given.) Hist. of Cole Co., p. 203. John Colgan moved to Cole County in 1819. (--Hist. of Cole Co., p. 212.)

Henley (elevation 575 feet)

Henley is situated at Sec. 35, Twp. 42 N, Range 13 West on Highway H near Miller County Line.

Hickory Creek

Hickory Creek was platted by M. H. Belshe, on the east half of the S.W. 1/4 of S.E. 1/4 of Sec. 9, Twp. 42 N, Range 13 West, for John Lumpkin, and acknowledged by him December 14, 1867. It is 21 miles south, southwest of Jefferson City, and had 1 school-house and 1 store. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 168.) It is on Highway 54, northeast of Eldon (Miller Co.)

Honey Creek

Honey Creek is situated at Sec. 22, Twp. 43 N, Range 12 West on an unmarked county road north of E west of the junction with B. Mail via Jefferson City; no population shown. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Jefferson City (elevation 625 feet)

The congressional act of March 6, 1820, authorized the establishment of a State government, also set apart four sections of public lands as a site for the capital. The constitutional convention of July 19, 1820, accepted the act of Congress, and the first State Legislature, in the act of September, 1820 (providing for the establishment of the permanent seat of government), appointed five commissioners for the purpose. Cote Sans Dessein, in Callaway Co., was named as the place, and the first Monday in May, 1821, as the time of the meeting of the commissioners... Now the contest for the capital was begun. Peter Bass and William Leintz founded the town of Marion, and offered 450 acres as a site; Angus L. Langham made a similar offer at Cote Sans Dessein...But the commissioners...chose Jefferson City. (After considerable legal action, the site was approved)... The new location did not become the capital in fact until the fall of 1826...Jefferson City was incorporated November 7, 1825...but not until 1839 was the act of incorporation observed...The first house in Jefferson City was erected in 1819...(--Hist. of Cole Co., pp. 277, 278, 279, 280.)

[4]

The State Penitentiary was opened March 1, 1836, and William Eidson (convicted of stealing a watch in Greene County) (was) installed as the first prisoner. (--Hist. of Cole Co., p. 240.) An act of Congress, passed March 6, 1820, authorized the organization of Missouri as a State, and made a grant of four undesignated sections of public land as a capital site. The first State Legislature, elected in anticipation of the admission of Missouri to the Union, convened in St. Louis in September, 1820, and appointed as commissioners to make the capital location, John Thornton, of Howard County; Robert G. Watson, of New Madrid; John S. White, of Pike Co.; and James Logan, of Wayne Co.; and Jesse B. Boone, of Montgomery Co.; the latter died soon afterward, and was succeeded by Daniel M. Boone, of Gasconade. The commissioners met in May, 1821, at Cote Sans Dessein (now Barkersville) in Callaway County, which place contested with the new town of Marion in Cole County, for the location. The rival claims were disregarded, and the present site was chosen, being described in the official report as fractional Secs. 6, 7 and 8, Secs. 17 and 18, and so much of Sec. 19 & 20 as would make up four sections in frac-...Township 44 N, south of the river and Range 17 west. (--Encyclopedia of the Hist. of Mo., Conard, Vol. 3, p. 427.) It covers several sections in Twp. 49 N, Ranges 11 & 12 West at the junction of Highways 50, 51 & 54.

Lohman

Lohman, the new name given to Stringtown about 1884, is 12 miles southwest of Jefferson City. C. W. Lohman (the first postmaster), N. Dsubler and Lohman & Co. were the general dealers. In addition there was a flouring and saw mill; a saw mill and a flouring mill. (--Hist. of Cole Co., p. 304; The State of Missouri in 1904, p. 367.) It is situated at Sec. 21, Twp. 44 N, Range 13 West on Highway D north of C.

Marion

Marion was platted in 1820 by William and Daniel McKenzie, of Howard County, and Bass and Lintz, of Boone County, at Moniteau Rock, two miles below the mouth of that creek. A year later the seat of justice for the new county was placed there...In 1826*, when the seat of justice was moved to Jefferson City, the old court house was sold for $450.00.

[5]

The town of Marion was incorporated November 10, 1857...There was little or nothing done under this charter, and when the establishment of Moniteau County, in 1845, cut off all hopes of its being again in the county seat of Cole, the business as well as the municipal circle fell to pieces... *(--Hist. of Cole Co., pp. 299, 300, refer to the removal of the State Capital.) The courts were moved to Jefferson City, February 20, 1829. (--Hist. of Cole Co., pp. 234, 235.) Marion lingered a while after the State capital was removed to Jefferson City...The town is fifteen miles above Jefferson City, on a bold, rocky shore of the Missouri... At the point of land between the Missouri and Osage Rivers, ca. 1820, a town was laid off. Lots to the amount of twenty or thirty thousand dollars were then sold...No improvement was made there. The best "corner lots" were still encumbered with the native crab-tree and the principal streets were thickly shaded with hazel. The only business in the wholesale and retail line there was carried on by a single concern. This was the commission and forwarding house of Rackoon, Possum & Co. The operation of this house, or the broken surface of the country, may have given the reproachful name of varmint county to Cole, which it never deserved. (--Wetmore's Gazetteer of the State of Mo., 1837, p. 63.) Marion, on the Missouri River, 7 miles north, northwest of Centertown, was originally the county seat. It had 2 stores, a saw mill and 1 church. (--Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, p. 168.) The population in 1900 was 40. (--Encyclopedia of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conard, Vol. 4, p. 189.) Marion is situated at Sec. 32, Twp. 46 N, Range 13 West on Highway 41. Mail via Centertown; population 30. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Osage Bend

Osage Bend is situated at Sec. 9, Twp. 43 N, Range 12 West on Highway B south of E. Mail via Jefferson City; population 40. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Osage Bluffs

Osage Bluffs, twelve miles south of the capital, claimed in 1885 a population of 100. John W. Jacobs was postmaster, merchant and blacksmith. Other businesses included a general store, sawmill and a wagon shop. (--Hist. of Cole Co., p. 304; Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, p. 168.) It is situated at Sec. 26, Twp. 42 N, Range 12 West on B south of E. Mail via Jefferson City; no population shown. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[6]

Osage (formerly known as Osage City)

Osage is a town at the confluence of the Missouri and Osage Rivers, and on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, eight miles from Jefferson City. It had a union chapel, open to all denominations...The nearest public school was two miles distant. In 1890 the population was 500. (--Ency. of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conard, Vol. 5, p. 28.) McKernon's Addition to Osage City was surveyed by W. Vogdt and acknowledged by the owner March 9, 1867. The original town is shown west of the river, principally south of the railroad, High Street bounding it south and the depot tracks and side tracks to warehouses, north, with the main street on the river bank. The addition named bounds the town on the north, south and west. (--Hist. of Cole Co., p. 304.) It had 1 large flouring mill, 2 saw-mills, 1 stave and barrel factory, several stores and 1 hotel. (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, p. 168.) It is situated at Sec. 21, Twp. 44 N, Range 10 West at the end of Highway J.

Pratt's Mills

Pratt's Mills were eleven miles south of Centre Town. (--Hist. of Cole Co., p. 204.) It is no longer listed.

Russelville (elevation 880 feet)

Russelville was surveyed...May 3, 1838. The town is seventeen miles southwest of Jefferson City...The storm of June, 1875, carried the union church building (three miles west of Russelville) off its foundations. The Masonic and Odd Fellows Hall, completed that month, was demolished. The fire of January, 1883, swept away much of the old town, destroying property of L. Zorn & Co., valued at $6,000. The Odd Fellows lost their building, in which was H. L. Enloe's store and Dr. J. B. Martin's drug store. Jacob Damph's dwelling was also destroyed... (--Hist. of Cole Co., pp. 302, 303; also Ency. Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conard, Vol. 5, p. 416.) It is situated at Sec. 2 & 3, Twp. 43 N, Range 14 West and Sec. 34 & 35, Twp. 44 N, Range 14 West, at the junction of Highways K & C.

St. Martins

St. Martins is situated at Sec. 3, Twp. 44 N, Range 13 West on Highway 50, west of T & D. Mail via Jefferson City; population 50. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[7]

St. Thomas

St. Thomas, situated in the southwest corner of Osage Township, was first settled in 1855, Judge Walter erecting the first building on the present (1889) National St. A second house, built by a Mr. Buern, and one other constituted the town before the (Civil) War. After that Judge S. N. Schell began the manufacture of boots and shoes. Other businesses were manufacturers of wagons and plows, shoemaker, tin shop, brick mason, physicians, etc. (--Hist. of Cole Co., p. 303.) It is a post-office 18 miles south of Jefferson City. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 168.) It is situated at Sec. 23, Twp. 42 N, Range 12 West on Highway B between Osage River and Miller Co. line. It is incorporated but not listed in 1970 census. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Schubert

Schubert was situated at Sec. 32, Twp. 44 N, Range 10 West on Highway 63 south of Spur J.

Scott's Station (Upper Jefferson, Scott)

This place was on the Missouri Pacific R. R., 7 miles west of Jefferson City. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 168.) It was east of Elston. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.) It was situated at Sec. 30, Twp. 45 N, Range 12 West on an unmarked county road east of Elston. It is no longer listed.

Scrivner (Scrivener)

It is northeast of Decatur. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.) Mail via Russellville; no population shown. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Scruggs

Scruggs was situated at Sec. 18, Twp. 44 N, Range 12 West between Highways 50 & C east of the junction with D.

Plummer

Plummer was located between Scruggs and Lohman, on the Missouri Pacific R. R. (--Map of Mo., 1971, Thos. D. Murphy, Red Oak, IA.)

[8]

Stringtown

Stringtown, on the southwest qr. of Sec. 21, Twp. 44 N, Range 13 West, was surveyed by W. Vogdt, and acknowledged by John and Andrew Blockberger, February 11, 1882. (--Hist. of Cole Co., p. 304.) See Lohman. Stringtown had 1 store. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 168.) Stringtown is no longer listed in Cole County; Stringtown in Butler County. (--Rand McNally, 1974.)

Taos

Taos is south of Ewing and Osage City. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.) It is situated at Sec. 6, Twp. 43 N, Range 10 West on Highway M east of the junction with Y. Mail via Jefferson City. Taos also in Buchanan County. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Teal

Teal was southwest of St. Thomas, on Osage River. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.)

Turner's Mill

Turner's Mill was on the Bois Brule. (--Hist. of Cole Co., p. 204.) It is no longer listed.

Upper Jefferson

See Scott's Station. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 168.)

Wardsville

Wardsville is situated at Sec. 7, Twp. 43 N, Range 11 West at the junction of M & B. Mail via Jefferson City; incorporated 1965. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Whirlsville

Whirlsville was due south of Jefferson City. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.)
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