A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Cooper County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


[1]

Bell Air

Bell Air, two and one-half miles west of New Palestine, had 1 store, a school-house and church, a blacksmith shop and a post-office. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 135.) It was a post-office seven miles northwest of Bunceton. (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 173.) It is situated at Sec. 13, Twp. 47 N, Range 18 West at the junction of Highways 5 & F. (--General Highway Map of Cooper County, issued by The Missouri State Highway Dept., 10-1-63. Unless otherwise noted all map descriptions are from this map.) Mail via Bunceton. No population shown. (--Standard Reference Guide of Missouri, Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Bellingsville (Billingsville)

It was a station on the Boonville Branch, about six miles south of Boonville and had 1 store. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 135.) It was situated in Northwest quarter of Sec. 28, Twp. 48 N, Range 17 West, and was laid out by Osage Valley & Southern Railway Co., Feb. 8, 1869. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 797; also, Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 173. It was situated at Sec. 28, Twp. 48 N, Range 17 West on Highway 5 south of 70. Billingsville had a post-office in 1931-32. (--MO. Manual, p. 732.) Neither town is listed in Rand, McNally, 1974.

Blackwater

Blackwater is in the northwest corner of the county, 7 1/2 miles of Lamine, near the Saline County line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Walter Williams, p. 369.) It is situated at Sec. 34 & 27, Twp. 47 N, Range - at the junction of Highways DD & K.

Boonville (elevation 610 feet)

The town was laid out by Asa Morgan and Charles Lucus, and the plat filed on the first day of August, 1817. It was surveyed by William Ross...Mrs. Hannah Cole, mother of Capt. Samuel Cole, made the first settlement on a part of the land on which Boonville is located, in the year 1810, and took a pre-emption, which she sold to Bird Lockhart and Henry Carroll, January 25th, 1819, for a trifle. The first settler in the old limits of Boonville was Gilliard Roupe...The next was a ferry house, built by Roupe at the mouth of Roupe's Creek, where he had a ferry landing. The first ferry was kept by the Widow Cole's boys.

[2]

A Frenchman named Roubadeux kept the first store in Boonville, in a cabin built of poles...Shortly afterwards a man named Nolin kept a grocery on the flat, at the mouth of Roupe's Branch...This part of the town was mostly built in 1816 and 1817. James Bruffy was the first blacksmith...On Christmas Day, 1819, a fight occurred between the young men of Old Franklin (Howard Co.) and the Boonville boys. The young men of Old Franklin had crossed the river on ice for the express purpose as they termed it, "of cleaning out Boonville." The old men of Boonville had to come to the rescue of their young men, and the contest for some time remained in doubt; but at last Boonville had to give way to superior numbers, there being but a few inhabitants here then. There was no one killed or mortally wounded. But where is Old Franklin now? Then the metropolis of Western Missouri. The sea of commerce, wealth, fashion and power swept away by the waters of the Missouri River. The only house left now (1876) is now owned by Mr. Wm. Smith, built in the suburbs of that once prosperous city. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, pp. 126, 127, 128, 129. See, also, Old Franklin in A Directory of Towns, Villages and Hamlets, Past and Present of Howard Co., Moser.) In 1840 the first steamboat was built and successfully launched at Boonville. It was built under the superintendence of Captain McCourtney, and was intended for the Osage trade. It was called the "Warsaw." As a port of entry, Boonville excelled any other town on the river above St. Louis. As many as five and six steamboats would often land during the day and night, for the purpose of taking on or discharging freight... Boonville is situated in the Northeast Quarter of Sec. 35, Twp. 49 N, Range 17 West, and was laid out by Charles Lucas and Captain Asa Morgan on the 1st day of August, 1817. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, pp. 660, 797; Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, pp. 173, 174.) It is situated on Highways 40, B & 87. (--General Highway Map of Cooper County.)

Bunceton

Bunceton is located on the Osage Valley & Southern Kansas R. R., 14 miles south of Boonville. It had 1 church, a Masonic Hall, a flour mill, about 6 stores, 2 shoe shops, one tailor shop, two drug stores, three physicians and one lawyer...It was located in 1869, and had a population of about 400 (1876). (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, pp. 134, 135.) It is situated on Sec. 4 & 5, Twp. 46 N, Range 17 West...It was laid out in 1868, by Harvey Bunce, Esq...He laid out 10 acres of land lying in Kelly Township, and the first building was erected by E. B. Bunce, Sr. In 1869, Mr. Thomas J. Parrish added 10 acres from Palestine Township, making 20 acres in the townsite...In 1871 the county court set all of the town in Kelly Township. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 689.)

[3]

Note: According to Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 173, Bunceton was laid out and settled in 1866, but on p. 425 Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri, 1901, Conard, Vol. 1, Bunceton was platted in 1868 by Harvey Bunce of Boonville. It is situated at Sec. 32, 33, Twp. 47 N, and Sec. 4, 5, Twp. 46 N, Range 17 West on Highway J between 5 & B.

Byberry

Byberry was in the southwest corner of the county, east of Otterville. (--Sectional Map of Missouri, 1894, Rand, McNally; The State of Missouri, in 1904, Williams, p. 369.) Apparently it was in Sec. 5, Twp. 45 N, Range 18 West on Highway 50, east and south of Otterville. The post-office was discontinued Oct. 31, 1919; thereafter mail via Otterville. (--MO. Manual, 1919-1920, p. 732.) It is no longer listed.

Choteau Springs

Choteau Springs is situated at Sec. 16, Twp. 48 N, Range 18 West on an unmarked county road east of Highway M south of 70. Mail via Boonville. No population shown. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

"Old Round Hill"

The first mill in Moniteau Township was erected by a man named Howard at what was afterwards known as "Old Round Hill." Judge C. H. Smith, and an Englishman named Summers, also kept a store at that place. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 156. History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 693.)

Clark's Fork Post Office

It is situated 9 miles southeast of Boonville and had 1 mill and 1 store. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 136; Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 174.) It is situated at Sec. 27, 34, Twp. 48 N, Range 16 West on Highways 47 & 87 south from Highway 70. Mail via Bunceton. No population shown. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[4]

Clear Creek Post Office

Clear Creek Post-Office was sixteen miles southwest of Boonville and had one store and had 2 churches, and 2 school houses. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 136; Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 174.) It is no longer listed. Clifton (or Clifton City) It was a station and post-office on the M. K. & T. R. R., and is located near the Pettis County line...It had 1 store and blacksmith shop. It was an important shipping point. It is situated in N. E. 1/4 Sec. 18, and N. W. 1/4 Sec. 17, Twp. 46 N, Range 19 West; was laid out by Peter W. Ladue, September 29, 1873. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 798.) There was a post-office there in 1931-32. Now Mail via Otterville. Population 125. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Conners Mill P. O.

It was 8 miles east of Boonville and was situated in a good wheat growing country. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 136; Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 174.) It is no longer listed. Apparently it was in Sec. 13, Twp. 48 N, Range 16 West on Little Saline Creek, or Petite Saline Creek. (--General Highway Map of Cooper County, with the aid of New Atlas of Missouri, Map # 19.)

Carioli

Carioli was on R. F. D northwest of Pilot Grove. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Williams, p. 369.) It is no longer listed.

Cotton

Cotton was in the southeast section of the county near Moniteau Creek. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Williams, p. 369.) It was situated at Sec. 19 & 30, Twp. 46 N, Range 16 West at the end of Highway T south of J. It is no longer listed.

Crossroads (Name unknown)

Another town, the name of which is now (1883) unknown, was located at the "Cross Roads" north of Conner's Mill, near the late residence of Judge Jesse Ogden, but was soon abandoned. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 727.)

[5]

Dick

Dick was southeast of Bunceton. (--Evening in Wisconsin Edition World Atlas, 1896, Rand, McNally, p. 48.)

Elkton (now Otterville)

It is situated in N.E. 1/4 Sec. 4, Twp. 45 N, Range 19 West and was laid out by George W. Wear and Gideon R. Tomkins, Aug. 26, 1873. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 798.) There is an Elkton in Hickory County. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Fairview

Fairview was in Prairie Home Township? (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 1121.)

Fort McMahan

In the year 1812 or 1813 there was a fort, called "Fort McMahan", built somewhere in Lamine Township, but the exact location could not be ascertained. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 154.)

Gooches Mill (also spelled Gootch, formerly Milton, q.v.)

It is 12 miles east of Boonville, and had 1 store and 1 blacksmith shop. It is celebrated for its salt lick nearby, and mostly called Big Lick, which is the place James Cole and James Davis killed two Indians in 1812. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 136; Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 174.) It is situated at Sec. 29 & 20, Twp. 48 N, Range 15 West on Highway V south of P & 70. Gooch Mill mail via Prairie Home. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Harriston (or Harrison)

It was a station and post-office on the M. K. & T. R. R., 15 miles southwest of Boonville, and was located by Dr. N. W. Harrison in 1873; had 2 stores and 1 blacksmith shop. It was situated in NE. 1/4 Sec. 13, Twp. 47 N, Range 19 West; laid out by Dr. N. W. Harrison July 10, 1873. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 136; Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 174.) It is not listed in Rand, McNally, 1974.

[6]

Hirst

Hirst was near the south edge of the county on the M. K. & T. R. R., south of Vermont which is the first station south of Bunceton. (--Sectional Map of MO, 1894, Rand, McNally.) It is no longer listed.

Houstonville (Saline Township)

Houstonville was laid off by B. W. Levens (see Washington) and John Ward at the ferry landing, opposite to Rocheport, and some lots were sold, but not much improved. The site of the town has long since disappeared under the waters of the Missouri River. It existed near the present site of Overton, now in Missouri River. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 727.) It is no longer listed.

Lamine Post Office

Lamine Post Office, 14 miles west of Boonville, had 2 stores... (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 136.) The first business house was erected in the village of Lamine in 1869, by Samuel Walton...A store was opened in November, 1871, by Redd & Gibson. J. J. Simms had a blacksmith shop, and Dr. F. Davidson operated the drug store, (both in 1883). (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 174.) It is situated at Sec. 3, Twp. 48 N, Range 18 West on Highways 41 & CC. Mail via Boonville. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Lebanon (see New Lebanon)

Lebanon was situated at Sec. 7, Twp. 46 N, Range 18 West in Lebanon Township. (--New Atlas of Missouri, Campbell, Map # 19.)

Lick (Prairie Lick)

Lick is situated at Sec. 18, Twp. 48 N, Range 17 West on an unmarked county road leading from 135 south of 70. Mail via Boonville. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[7]

Lone Elm P. O.

Lone Elm P. O., had 1 store and a blacksmith shop. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 136.) It is 18 miles south of Boonville. (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 174.) It is situated at Sec. 24, Twp. 47 N, Range 17 West on Highways B & KK. Mail via Bunceton. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Martinsville

Martinsville was in Pilot Grove Township. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 828.)

Merna

Merna was located at Sec. 35, Twp. 49 N, Range 16 West on Mo. Pac. R. R., east of Boonville. It is no longer listed.

Milton (now Gooch's Mill, q.v)

Milton was laid out by Charles McArthur, Leonard Calvert and Jesse Ogden, July 7, 1837. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 798.) Milton in Platte Co.; Milton in Randolph Co. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Nelson (Kelly Township)

Apparently Nelson was in Sec. 33, Twp. 46 N, Range 17 West near Highway B. (--General Highway Map of Cooper County, with the aid of New Atlas of Missouri, Campbell, Map #19.) No town Nelson in Cooper Co.; is a Nelson in Saline Co. )(--Rand, McNally, 1974.

New Lebanon

New Lebanon is five and one-half miles south of Pleasant Green. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Williams, p. 369.) It is situated at Sec. 7, Twp. 46 N, Range 18 West on Highway C between E & 50. Mail via Bunceton; population 25. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[8]

Old Palestine

Old Palestine was laid off by Michael Son in the year 1833. It was located about 1 mile west of New Palestine, and 12 miles southwest of Boonville...Michael Son built the first house in Old Palestine, and in it kept what was then called a "grocery"...James Taliaferro had a saddle shop, and Jacob Schulter, Taylor Hammer and some others had blacksmith shops...J. Lawrence Stephens, R. J. Parrish and Chas. F. Moore were among the last merchants. Old Palestine was indeed, for many years a good business place. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, pp. 137, 138.) Old Palestine was built about a public square and was an important and thriving community from later pioneer times, through the Mexican and Civil War periods, and until the community drew away to the railroad to establish New Palestine, later named Speed. (--History of Cooper County, 1937, E. J. Milton, p. 498.)

Otterville (elevation 735 feet)

The town of Otterville was first called Elkton. It was laid out by Gideon R. Thompson, in the year 1837...William G. Wear entered the forty acres on which Elkton was built in the year 1836 and sold it to Thompson in 1837. Mr. Thompson built the first house, and he and George Wear built a storehouse directly west of Thompson's dwelling..."Long" George Wear built the first house within the present limits of Otterville proper... There was no post-office at Otterville until about 1848. The mail for this neighborhood was supplied from Arater post-office, kept by General Hogan...W. G. Wear was the first postmaster. He held the office until 1851...The mail was a special one from Arater...The Pacific Railroad was completed to Otterville from St. Louis in 1860, and this place for a short time became the terminus...But it was not destined to enjoy this prosperity long. The railroad transferred the terminus to Sedalia...and Sedalia has become a great railroad center, while Otterville has sunk back to its original obscurity... Otterville had in 1883, about 400 population. It had three general stores, one hardware and grocery store, two drug stores, one confectionery, one furniture store, two blacksmith shops, one saloon, four churches and one school. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, pp. 705, 706, 707, 708.) Otterville is twenty-six miles southwest of Boonville. It had six churches, public school, a select school...and a number of business houses...Six miles north of Otterville is the site of New Lebanon, settled in 1819, by Kentuckians among whom was the Rev. Finis Ewing, one of the founders of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The town was abandoned and many of the inhabitants removed in 1837 and laid out the town of Elkton, which in 1857 was incorporated as Otterville. (--Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri, 1901, Conard, Vol. 5, p. 38.)

[9]

Otterville was incorporated Feb. 16th, 1857. (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 174.) It is situated at Sec. 3, 4, Twp. 45 N, Range 19 West and Sec. 34, Twp. 46 N, Range 19 West, on Highway 50 & BB.

Overton

Overton, 11 miles east of Boonville, had a post-office, several stores and a blacksmith shop. It is situated on the Missouri River opposite Rocheport. It had a ferry across the Missouri River. It was an important shipping point. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 136. Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 174.) It is situated at Sec. 5, Twp. 48 N, Range 15 West on Highway 98, northeast of the junction with P. Mail via Boonville; no population. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Petersburg

It is north of Bunceton on MO. PAC. R. R. (--Map of Missouri, 1903, Geo. P. Cram.) It is now in Howard County and is known as Cooper's Chapel. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Pilot Grove (elevation 835 feet)

Pilot Grove is situated on the M. K. & T. R. R., about 12 miles southwest of Boonville and was located in 1873. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 135.) It is located on the NE. qr of Sec. 5, Twp. 47 N, Range 18 West, in Pilot Grove Township. The town was laid off in 1873 by Samuel Roe...as early as 1836, the government located a post-office about one mile from the present town and called it Pilot Grove, appointing John McCutcheon, postmater...It is one of the oldest in the county... The first business house in the town was moved to Pilot Grove from Dr. W. P. Harriman's mill, about the year 186-...The first dwelling house was erected by a Mr. Haynes, who was a harness maker and saddler...It contained 4 general stores, 1 drug store, 1 hardware store, 2 tin shops, 1 furniture store, 1 saddle and harness shop, 2 restaurants, 2 millinery stores, 1 lumber yard, 3 blacksmith shops, shoemaker shop, and 2 livery stables. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 717.) It is located at the junction of Highways M, 135 & N. Pilot Grove takes its name from an ancient grove of hickory trees, located upon the high prairie in the immediate vicinity. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 717.)

[10]

Pisgah

Pisgah is located in the southeast part of Cooper Co. about 17 miles from Boonville. It is the oldest town in the county except Boonville. It was located about 1830, the Hon. David Jones being the first settler. It had 2 churches, the Christian and Baptist. It had 2 or 3 stores and blacksmith shops, 2 physicians and 1 lawyer... (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 137.) It is situated in S 1/2 of NW 1/4 and north 1/2 of NW 1/4 of Sec. 2, Twp. 46 N, Range 16 West and was laid out by Jame A. Reavis, June 30, 1836. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 798.) It is on Highway O south of J. (--Gen. Map of Cooper Co., MO State Highway Dept.) Mail via Bunceton; no population. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Pleasant Green

Pleasant Green is located on the M. K. & T. R. R., about 18 miles southwest from Boonville. It had 2 stores and 1 drug store. It was an important shipping point. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 135.) It is situated in SW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of Sec. 25, Twp. 47 N, Range 19 West and was laid out by George Steinberger, June 28, 1873. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 798.) It is on Highway E west of 135. (--General Highway Map of Cooper Co., Missouri State Highway Dept.) Mail via Pilot Grove; population 18. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.) Prairie Home P. O. (Prairie Home Village) Prairie Home P. O., 18 miles southeast of Boonville had 1 store and 2 schools--one public and a private boarding school, kept by Prof. Slaughter. Prof. Slaughter was one of the most successful teachers in the county. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, pp. 136, 137; Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 174.) Prairie Home Village is located on Sec. 20, Twp. 47 N, Range 15 West. The first store was erected by James Boswell. John Zimmerman began business in 1874. The first blacksmith was William Dorderman...James W. Jones was postmaster in 1883. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 722.) It is on Highways J, EE, D & 87. (--Gen. Highway Map of Cooper Co.)

Prairie Lick

See Lick. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[11]

Sale

Sale was in the southwestern section of the county west of Vermont. (--Evening in Wisconsin Edition, World Atlas, 1896, Rand, McNally p. 48.)

Sardine

Sardine is mentioned in Encyclopedia of the History of Missouri, 1901, Conard, Vol. 2, p. 132. It was near Clark's Fork. Sardine was a corruption of the name of its most prominent citizen, one elderly Dean, whose sour countenance gave him the nickname of "Sorry." Eventually "Sorry" Dean became Sardine and the hamlet bore his nickname. A general store, a blacksmith shop, a stage stop and several houses comprised the place. (--History of Cooper Co., 1937, E. J. Melton, p. 498.)

Soleville

Soleville was 4 miles southeast of New Lebanon. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Williams, p. 369.) It is no longer listed.

Speed

See New Palestine; Old Palestine. (--Hist. of Cooper Co., 1937, Melton, p. 498.) Speed is situated at Sec. 8, Twp. 47 N, Range 17 West on Highway F between 5 & B. Mail via Boonville; population 75. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

New Palestine

New Palestine is situated on the Osage Valley & Southern Kansas R. R., and about 12 miles south of Boonville. It had 1 store and 1 blacksmith shop and about 100 inhabitants--1876. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 135.) Situated in E 1/2 of SW 1/4 of Sec. 8, Twp. 47 N, Range 17 West; laid out by J. L. Stephens, August 20, 1868. (--History of Howard & Cooper Counties, 1883, Nat'l Hist. Society, p. 798.) See Speed.

Sweeney

Sweeney was in the southwest corner of the county in Clear Creek Township on M. K. & T. R. R. (--Map of Missouri, 1937, Rand, McNally.) It is no longer listed.

[12]

Vermont

Vermont was a station and post-office on the Osage Valley and Southern Kansas R. R., 3 miles south of Bunceton. It had 1 store and 1 blacksmith shop. (--History of Cooper County, 1876, Levens, p. 137; Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 174.) Apparently it was in Sec. 15, Twp. 46 N, Range 17 West near Highway B. (--General Highway Map of Cooper County, with the aid of New Atlas of Missouri, Campbell, Map #19.) It is no longer listed. Walnut Grove (Prairie Home Township) A Christian Church - Disciples of Christ - was organized by Elder O. P. Davis on the first Lord's Day in December, 1862, with 16 members. (--Christian Church in Mo., 1888, p. 257; Hist. of Howard & Cooper Co., 1883, p. 826.) (This was determined by locating some of the charter members of the church and by reading their biographies in Prairie Home Township.)

Washington (Saline Township)

There was a town called Washington, laid off by B. W. Levens, about 1 mile below Overton...Several lots were sold, houses built, and for a while considerable business was done. But the site of the town has long since disappeared, and the spot on which it was located cannot be designated by any person living. Indeed, but few in that locality are aware of the fact that such a town was ever located and inhabited. (--History of Cooper Co., 1876, Levens, p. 191.)

Wills

Wills was in the southwest corner of the county in Clear Creek Township on the M. K. & T. R. R. Map of Missouri, 1937, Rand, McNally. It is no longer listed.

Woolridge

Woolridge is in the northwest corner of the county, near Moniteau Co. line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Williams, p. 369.) It is situated at Sec. 23, Twp. 48 N, Range 15 West on Highways P & H.
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