A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Douglas County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


[1]

Ann

This town was three and one-quarter miles northwest of Florilla. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Walter Williams, p. 383.) It was located at Section 7, Township 27 N, Range 11 W, at the intersection of Highways EE & AD. (--Highway Map of Douglas County, as issued by The State Highway Department of Missouri. Unless otherwise indentified, all land descriptions are from this map which was issued March 15, 1968.)

Arden

This town was four and one-half miles southeast of Dogwood. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383. Map of Western States, Rand, McNally & County, 1911.) It was located at Section 33, Township 27 N, Range 17 W, on Highway O.

Arno

This was a post-office five miles west of Ava. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, p. 198. Also, The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383, where it is shown to have been seven miles north of Roy.)

Ava

The most original example of allegorical methods is provided by the name of Ava, the county seat of Douglas. We are told in II Kings 17: 24 that it was a heathen city which took a leading part of the oppression of the Chosen People: "And the king of Assyria brought men from Ava...and placed them in the cities of Samaria instead of the children of Israel; and they possessed Samaria and dwelt in the cities thereof." Ava is supposed to mean "overthrowing". Apparently its founder intended a humorous reference to Ava's "overthrowing" its rival aspirant for the county seat. If one story told down in Douglas County is true, the overthrow was not accomplished in strict accordance with Scriptural rules of behavior. It is alleged that the three commissioners appointed to lay out the town stole the county records from its hated rival Vera Cruz and brought them over to Ava by force, thus establishing their town as the official head of the county permanently. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, Robert L. Ramsay, p. 101.) Ava, the county seat of Douglas County, was located in 1864. (--How Missouri Counties, Towns, and Streams Were Named, by David W. Eaton, Third Article, p. 165, from a series of articles in the Missouri Historical Review.)

[2]

It is thirty miles southeast of Marshfield, and about ten miles west of Bryant's Fork. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, p. 198. Also, The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It is located at sections 11, 12, township 26 N, range 16 W, at the intersection of Highways 5, 14, Y, 176. On March 4, 1889, the county court organized the town of Ava as a village, with James Hailey, Sr., Martin Singleton, George B. Waters, J. M. Curnett and John McDaniel as the first Board of Trustees. This organization ran along until November, 1891, when for some reason the town was disincorporated and on the same day re-incorporated. Just who the officers were under the new re-incorporation, the records do not show. The last organization kept until 1893, when the people lost interest, a few refused to pay their taxes, and the city quit doing business as such. At intervals thereafter for eight or ten years efforts were made to either revive the old corporation or to re-incorporate. On November 7, 1908, with the new railroad coming to Ava--it became necessary for some kind of city government. Therefore--on this date, the petitions and a plat were presented to the County Court, and the court made an order incorporating Ava as a city of the fourth class. The following officers were appointed to hold office until the annual city election, April 1, next: George R. Curry, Mayor, H. E. Bach, M. Olsen, Bud Reynolds and Paul Coleman, Alderman, C. H. Coble, collector and M. M. Miller, marshal. (--A Reminiscent History of Douglas County, Missouri, 1857-1957, compiled and written by J. E. Curry, p. 104. Used by permission.)

Basher

This town was named for a land owner nearby. (--How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named, by David W. Eaton, Third Article, p. 165.) It was located at Section 29, Township 27 N, Range 15 W, at the intersection of Highways 76 & U.

[3]

Beaver

This was a post-office, six miles northwest of Ava. (--Missouri Gazetteer, p. 198. Also, The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was on Honey Creek and Beaver Creek. (--New Atlas of Mo., Campbell, 1874, Map #33.)

Bertha

This locality was located at section 21, township 25 N, range 13 W, approximately one-half mile southwest of Highway 95, on an unmarked highway, approximately one-half mile south of Gentryville.

Biggs

This town was seven and one-half miles south of Phlegeton. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

Blanche

It was seven and one-half miles south of Buckhart. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 30, township 25 N, range 12 W, on Highway AC, approximately one and one-half miles south of 14.

Brushyknob

This post-office village was four and one-half miles south of Idumean. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 4, township 26 N, range 14 W. It was on Highway 76, approximately three and one-quarter miles west of Highway C.

Bryant

Bryant was eight miles northeast of Ava. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 8, township 27 N, range 15 W, on Highway 5, near the head of Bryant Creek.

Buckhart

It was three miles south of Drury. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 36, township 26 N, range 13 W, on Highway CC, approximately one mile south of Highway 95.

[4]

Champion

This was located at section 17, township 26 N, range 13 W, on Highway WW, east of Highway C.

Cheney

This village was twelve miles south of Norwood (Wright County). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 1, township 26 N, range 14 W, on Highway 76, approximately 1 mile east of Highway C.

Copper Spring

It was near Bryant Creek, in the northwest part of the county, near the Wright County line. (--New Atlas of Mo., Campbell, 1874, Map #33.)

Cow Skin

It was approximately two miles south of Ava. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #33.)

Cross Roads

It was located at sections 18 & 19, township 25 N, on range line between ranges 17 & 18, on Highway DD.

Denlow

It was approximately five miles south of Omo, and five miles southwest of Prior. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 35, township 27 N, range 13 W, on Highway 76, approximately four miles west of Highway 95.

Depew

It was three and one-quarter miles southeast of John's Mills. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

[5]

Dogwood

It was in the northwest corner of the county. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Williams, p. 383.) It was located at section 18, township 27 N, range 17 W, at the junction of Highways DD & TT.

Drury

It is three miles southwest of Vanzant. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It is located at section 24, township 26 N, range 13 W, on Highway 95.

Evans

It was located at section 35, township 25 N, range 14 W, on Highways 14 & C.

Falling Springs (or Spring)

It was twenty miles east of Ava. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, Campbell, p. 198.)

Fielden

It was four miles southeast of Cheney, or eight miles north of Rockbridge (Ozark County). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

Filer

It was six miles south of Norwood (Wright County), and six miles north of Cold Springs. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.

Florilla

It was seven miles south of Ottomer. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

Forest Stone

It was approximately three miles southeast of Pryor's Store, on Spring Creek. (--New Atlas of Mo., Campbell, 1874, Map #33.)

[6]

Girdner

Girdner was ten miles south of Ava. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 16, township 25 N, range 16 W, on Highway P, southwest of Sweden.

Goodhope

It was six and one-half miles south of Arden. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 33, township 26 N, range 17 W, on Highways O & T. Also shown on Map of Western States, Rand, McNally & Co., 1911. Also, there was a Goodhope in Texas County, in 1974. (--New Atlas of Mo., 1874, Map #33.)

Goodville

It is located at sections 7 & 18, township 27 N, range 12 W, on Highway 95, approximately three miles south of Wright County line.

Granada

It was two and one-half miles northeast of Beaver. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Williams, p. 383.) It was named for the city in Spain, in 1895. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, Robert L. Ramsay, p. 30.)

Hebron

Hebron was located at section 26, township 25 N, range 11 W, west of Highway 181. Hebron, of Biblical derivation, was named in 1904. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, p. 102.)

Hest

Hest was located at sections 3 & 34, township 26 N, range 16 W, on Highway 5, near Highway A.

Heth

Heth was a post-office ten miles southwest of Vera Cruz. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 198.)

Jackson Mill

It was located at section 35, township 26 N, range 17 W, on highway which goes from 76 to O, at Roy.

John's Mill

John's Mill was in the northwest corner of the county, near the Christian County line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

[7]

Little Beaver

It was fifteen miles southwest of Ava. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, Campbell, p. 198.) It was near Beaver Creek. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

Loftin

The exact location is unknown, but is is mentioned in The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.

Mainard

Mainard was four and one-half miles southeast of Topaz. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

Midway

This community was half way between Ava and Mansfield. It was the site of a severe storm in March, 1938. Again, in 1945, a storm of tornadic proportions demolished the Midway Store; also, other communities were severely damaged in the same store. (--A Reminiscent History of Douglas County, Missouri., 1857-1957. J. E. Curry, used by permission, p. 127.)

Militia Springs

Militia Springs was located on what was later the William Huff farm, just one and a half miles north of the present location of Ava, so named because a troop of State Militia camped here during the Civil War. A government post-office was set up, and George Tompkins served as the postmaster. When the city of Ava was founded, however, Militia Springs returned to its original privacy. The post-office was brought to the new town of Ava in a towsack by M. C. Reynolds with the permission of his "Uncle Sam." (--A Reminiscent History of Douglas County, Missouri., 1857-1957, p. 13. J. E. Curry, used by permission.)

Merritt

Merritt was located at section 26, township 26 N, range 18 W, on Highway T, west of Goodhope.

[8]

Mount Zion

It was located at section 23, township 27 N, range 16 W, on Highway Z, west of Highway 5.

The ? Olathe

This hamlet was eight miles southeast of Mansfield (Wright County), or four and one-half miles north of Idumea. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

Old Merritt

Old Merritt was located at sections 34 & 35, township 26 N, range 18 W, on Highway T, where it curves to the north. It was approximately two miles west of Merritt.

Omo

Omo was six miles southeast of Norwood (Wright County). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

Omba

Omba was five miles northwest of Roosevelt. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

Ongo

Ongo was three miles southwest of Depew. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was locatetd at section 34, township 27 N, range 18 W, on Highway UU, south of Highway 14.

Ottomer

This village was six miles south of Cabool (Texas County). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, pp. 529 & 383.) It was in the northeast corner of the county.

Pansy

Pansy was three miles northwest of Goodhope. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) The post-office was discontinued between June 1, 1935 and June 1, 1939. (--Missouri Manual, 1939-1940, p. 937.)

[9]

Phlegeton

This town, with the very unusual name, was located six miles northwest of Topaz. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

Pike

Pike was three and three-quarter miles north of Ava, or eight miles southeast of Zenda. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

Pryor's Store

Pryor's Store was twelve miles southwest of Ava. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 198.)

Rippee

Rippee was three and one-half miles southwest of Cheney. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

Richville

It was thirty-five miles southeast of Ava. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 198.) It was six and one-half miles east of Blanche. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 15, township 25 N, range 12 W, on Highways 14 & W.

Red Bank

Red Bank was a post-office established in 1892 and discontinued in 1897; named by Willie Rhodes, because of its position on a red bank along the old Salt Road (q. v.). Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Missouri.

[10]

Rome

Rome was four and one-quarter miles south of Roy. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 23, township 25 N, range 17 W, on Highway A, approximately three miles east of Highway B. A cotton gin was at Rome in 1860. It was on the north side of Beaver Creek. The building was moved to the south side of the creek, enlarged and converted into a grist mill in 1869. The mill was a three-story frame and stone basement. A steel cable, about 100 feet long, led to the stream below the mill and turned the turbine by means of a wood cog wheel. The dam was first constructed of logs. It was reconstructed in 1915 of stone, steel and concrete. The spillway is in approximately the center of the dam. The general store was built a few feet from the mill in 1898. Rome was quite a flourishing little village for 60 years. A tomato canning factory was in business during the 1930's. Rome enjoyed a long existence. When the mill turbine stopped turning in 1940, and the general store and post-office locked its doors in 1948, it joined the ranks of the presently 126 "ghost villages" of the Missouri Ozarks. There's NO store, NO post-office, NO grist mill, NO canning factory...just the Russell Jackson's home...the old general store remodeled. Their mail comes to them by way of Ava, Missouri, Star Route. Mr. Clay Anderson of The Ozarks Mountaineer, kindly gave his permission for the use of this material. Rome was a post-office established before the Civil War, and named by Frank Richards for Rome, Italy. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Missouri.)

[11]

Olive Springs (later Sweden)

Olive Springs located where the post-office Sweden (q. v.) is now situated, and discovered by Oliver Williams. He declared the springs to be of medicinal value and named them Olive Springs, possibly with a partial reference to his own name. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Missouri.)

Roosevelt

Roosevelt, named for President (Theodore) Roosevelt, was in the southwest corner of the county, near the Howell County line, or three miles northwest of Siloam Springs, and on Spring Creek. (--How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named, by David W. Eaton, Third Article, p. 165, from a series of articles in The Missouri Historical Review; The State of Missouri, in 1904, pp. 407, 383.)

Roy

Roy was approximately three miles south of Goodhope. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 4, township 25 N, range 17 W, on Highway C.

Salt Road

An old road from Springfield to Jackson Port, Ark., over which the travelers used to haul merchandise. Salt was one of the most necessary commodities, and the most frequently hauled, so it was called the old Salt Road. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Missouri.)

Salt Road Post-Office

An early post-office, long since discontinued, named for the old Salt Road (q. v.), on which it was situated. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Missouri.) Salt Road was ten miles south of Ava. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, p. 198.)

Sandy

A post-office, established in 1890 and discontinued in 1891; named because of its situation on a sandy ridge. (Exact location unknown). (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Missouri.)

[12]

Sedan

Sedan was four and one-half miles southeast of Buckart. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

Silverton (later Hilo)

A post-office established in 1890 and later discontinued. It was named by John Patterson. The name was changed to Hilo (q. v.) about 1900. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Missouri.) Silverton was three miles southeast of Girdner. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 21, township 25 N, range 15 W, on Highway N, east of Highway 5. (Not designated as such on Missouri Highway Department map, but from other maps, i.e. issued by Missouri Home Life Insurance Life Company.)

Smallett (earlier Salt Road Post-Office)

A post-office, whose name is formed from the name of its first postmaster, James Small. However, Mr. T. A. Kay says that Jimmie Gray named it for someone else by the name of Small. The name, Smallett, was formed from the name of its first postmaster, James Small. (--How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named, by David W. Eaton, Third Article, p. 165.) It was four miles east of Rome. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 18, township 25 N, range 16 W.

Squires

Squires is nine miles south of Ava. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It is located at section 18, township 25 N, range 15 W, on Highway 5. Squires is a post-office, established in 1889, and named for John Squires, an Englishman, who had a store and the post-office. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Missouri.)

[13]

Swan Creek

Swan Creek starts at Dogwood Spring south of Highway 14, in Douglas County. It flows past Ongo and enters Christian County on what is known as the W. M. (Uncle Will) Nelson farm. (--Christian County, Its First 100 Years, Copyright used by permission, pp. 157-158.)

Sweden (earlier Olive Springs)

The post-office was established in 1899 and by mistake it was named Sweden. The people of the community intended to name the post-office for an old settler named Sweten, but they spelled it wrong and so it was called Sweden. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Mo.) Sweden was four and one-half miles southwest of Vera Cruz. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 6, township 25 N, range 14 W, on Highway 14.

Tedrick

A post-office established in 1899 by William Giles, and named for a Mr. Tedrick who ran a saw mill in the community. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Mo.) Tedrick was four and one-half miles southwest of Drury. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

Tigris

Tigris, a post-office established in 1921, and named by John Allen, first postmaster, for the river of Mesopotamia. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Mo.) Tigris was located at section 23, township 27 N, range 17 W, on Highway 14, approximately two and one-half miles east of Dogwood.

Topaz

A post-office established in 1894 by Bart Hutchinson, who selected the name from a list of post-offices; probably named for the California or Texas town of that name. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Mo.) Topaz was approximately six miles south of Florilla. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 12, township 26 N, range 12 W.

[14]

Twin Bridges

Twin Bridges is located at section 27, township 25 N, range 11 W, on Highway 14, approximately two and one-half miles west of the Howell County line.

Umpire

A post-office established in 1880 and discontinued in 1907. By whom it was named and why it has been impossible to find. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Mo.) (Exact location is unknown.)

Upshaw

A post-office established in 1891 and discontinued in 1893; it takes its name from a situation in a valley. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Mo.) (Exact location is unknown.)

Vanzant

Vanzant was three miles south of Prior. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 6, township 26 N, range 12 W. It was on Highway 95, approximately one mile south of Highway 76.

Vera Cruz

The town was established before the Civil War, probably during the time of the Mexican War (1846-49). It took its name from the city of Vera Cruz, Mexico. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Mo.) The former county seat was situated on Bryant's Fork of White River, tne miles southeast of Ava. It had two excellent saw-mills and one general store (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, Campbell, p. 198. Also, The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383, where it was located eight miles south of Brushy Knob.) It was located at sections 21 & 29, township 26 N, range 19 W.

[15]

Witty

A post-office, established in 1893 and discontinued in 1924. Named for "old man Witty", the first postmaster. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Mo.) Witty was three and one-quarter miles south of Little Beaver. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.) It was located at section 15, township 25 N, range 18 W, on Highway DD, approximately two miles west of Cross Roads.

Wood

A post-office, established in 1907 and discontinued between 1910-15. It was named for a man by the name of Wood who lived in the township. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Mo.) (Exact location is unknown.)

Zonker

A post-office, established in 1894 and discontinued in 1896; named for the Zonker family, who had the first post-office. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Mo.) (Exact location is unknown.)

Zenda

Zenda was approximately eleven and three-quarter miles south of Ava. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 383.)

[16]

Biggs

This was a post-office, listed on page 382 of Missouri Manual, 1901-1902. Exact location is unknown.

Denlow (earlier Upshaw)

A post-office on Fox Creek, established in 1896 and discontinued in 1916. See further, Denlow and Upshaw in the foregoing pages. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Mo.)

Hilo

A post-office, established by John Patterson in 1908 and discontinued in 1924; named by C. L. Holland, possibly for the important city of that name in Hawaii. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Mo.) (Exact location is unknown.)

Kip

A post-office, established in 1894 and discontinued in 1896. No one seems to know why or by whom it was named; however, there was a man in the vicinity whose name was Kip. (--Place Names in the Southwest Border Counties of Mo.) (Exact location is unknown.)

Prior

This was a post-office, listed on page 382 of Missouri Manual, 1901-1902. (Exact location is unknown.)    
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