A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Franklin County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


[1]

Argo

This community was listed as being in Franklin County. (--Hist. of Franklin County, 1888, Goodspeed, p. 341; Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 176.)

It is now (1978) listed as being in Crawford County. (--Standard Reference Guide of Missouri, 1974, Rand, McNally.)

Augusta Station

See Boles.

Bassora (see Washington)

The plat of the town of Bassora was made October 8, 1836, and the town was laid out by George Morton, William Walker, Baldwin King and Andrew King, Jr., on the Missouri River, and on Survey No. 2044, in fractional Section 23, Township 44, Range 1 west of the fifth principal meridian...The streets of this town running parallel with the Missouri River were Missouri Street, 100 feet wide, and First, Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth each 60 feet wide. Those running right angles to the above were Penn, Henry and Fulton, each 60 feet wide, Washington and Jefferson Avenues, each 80 feet wide and Franklin, Hancock and Boone, each 60 feet wide. By these streets the town was divided into 33 blocks, one of which was reserved for a market square, and two of which were reserved for public squares, one of the latter, Block 23, being now a cemetery...This cemetery has been abandoned and a public cemetery established in 1883... (--Hist. of Franklin Co., pp. 301, 302.)

Becker

Becker is a post-office listed in Missouri Manual, 1931, 32, p. 723. Location is unknown.

Beaufort

Beaufort is a post-office 9 miles west of Union. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 203.)

It is located at Section 31, Twp. 43 N, & Section 6, Twp. 42 N, R. 2 W, at the junction of Highways 155 & 50. (--General Highway Map of Franklin Co., issued by The Missouri State Highway Dept., 10-1-64. Unless otherwise noted all map descriptions are from this map.)

Beemont

Beemont is located at Section 10, Twp. 43 N, R. 4 W, at the western edge of the county near Gasconade County on Highway ZZ.
The post-office was discontinued as of July 31, 1917. Thereafter mail via Gerald. (--Missouri Manual, 1917-1918, p. 644.)

[2]

Berger (elevation 510 feet)

Berger was established as a settlement on April 15, 1856, about a year after the Pacific Railroad, forerunner of the present Missouri Pacific Lines had been constructed through this section of Franklin County. It probably got its name from a stream, and the stream, in turn, probably was named for Jacob Berger, an early-day explorer. (--The Empire that Missouri Pacific Serves, p. 192.)

Berger is situated on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. It was laid out June 7, 1870, by Charles Helmendach, into sixteen irregular blocks. Front, First and Second Streets run parallel with the railroad, and Elm, Market and Walnut the other way. (--Hist. of Franklin Co., p. 341.)

It is in the northwest corner of the county near Gasconade Co. line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Walter Williams, p. 387.)

It is 75 miles from St. Louis and had 2 stores (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 203.)

It is located at Section 2, Twp. 45 N, R. 3 W, on Highway Z.

Boeuf Creek

It was in the western part of the county, 8-3/4 miles south of New Haven. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 387.)

It was 5 miles southwest of Dundee, a small village which was laid off in 1868 and called Detmold; it had 1 flouring mill and 1 store. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 203.)

The post-office at Boeuf Creek was discontinued as of July 31, 1917; mail thereafter to New Haven. (--Missouri Manual, 1917-18, p. 644.)

Boeuf Creek was laid off in 1868, and first called Detmold and received its name from the creek on which it was located. Boeuf (Fr. Beef) so called from the great number of buffalo or (beeves') found on it at an early day. (--How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named, by David W. Eaton, 3rd Article, p. 167. From a series in Missouri Historical Review.)

Boles

Boles (Augusta Station), 63 miles from St. Louis, had 1 store. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 203.)

It was in the northeast part of the county, 3 miles west of Labaddie. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 387.)

It was located at Sections 27 & 34, Twp. 44 N, R. 1 E, on an unmarked county road north of M, west of Labaddie.

[3]

Boone

Boone was in the southwest corner of the county, near Gasconade Co. line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 387.)

Calvey

Calvey was a post-office 4 miles south of Robertsville. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 203.)

Calvey P. O. and creek were named for French explorer Calve. The name is spelled as it is pronounced in French. (--Eaton, p. 167.)

Calvey Station

See Robertsville. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 204.)

Campbellton

It is a post-office 6 miles west of Washington. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 204.)

It is a post-office southeast of New Haven, on R. F. D. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Section 28, Twp. 44 N, R. 2 W, on Highway 155 north of the junction with YY.

Mail via New Haven. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Casco

Casco is a post-office 10 miles northwest of Union. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 204.)

It is 5 miles southwest from Clover Bottom, or 9 miles south and west from Washington. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Section 17, Twp. 43 N, R. 2 W, on Highway 155 south of YY.

Mail via Leslie. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Catawissa (elevation 558 feet)

It is a small village on the St. Louis & San Francisco R. R., thirty-nine miles from St. Louis. (--Hist. of Franklin Co., p. 340.)

It was laid off in 1839 and had 4 stores (1874). (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 204.)

It is 4-1/2 miles southwest from Pacific. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Section 34, Twp. 43 N, R. 2 E, at the junction of O & N, east of Robertsville.

[4]

Cedar Fork

Cedar Fork was 12 miles south and 4-1/2 miles west of New Haven. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It was a post-office 18 miles southwest of Washington. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 204.)

Champion City

It is in the southwest section of the county, about 9 miles northwest of Sullivan. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Section 4, Twp. 41 N, R. 3 W, on Highway CC south of Leslie.

Mail via Leslie. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Clover Bottom

Clover Bottom is 6 miles south and west of Washington. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Section 2, Twp. 43 N, R. 2 W, at the junction of YY & AJ east of 155.

Mail via Washington. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Detmold

See Boeuf Creek. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 203.)

It is located at Section 20, Twp. 44 N, R. 3 W, on Highway Y south of E.

Mail via New Haven. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Dewey

Dewey was in the northwest corner of the county, east of Dundee. (--Map of Mo., 1917, Rand, McNally.)

Dina

Dina was in the eastern part of the county, east of Union. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

Dissen

Dissen is located at Section 15, Twp. 44 N, R. 3 W, on Highway Y south of Z.

Mail via New Haven. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[5]

Drain

Drain was in the western part of the county, 5-1/2 miles north of Beemont. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

Dry Branch

Dry Branch was a post-office on the A. & P. (Frisco) R. R., 23 miles from Pacific. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 204.)

Dundee

Dundee was located on the Missouri Pac. R. R., very near the ancient site of New Port, the first county seat. The old courthouse is still (1888) standing...The school house and church, like the old court house are both built in New Port...The post-office is at Dundee (1888). (--Hist. of Franklin Co., p. 341.)

It was laid off in 1857, and was 62 miles from St. Louis. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 204.)

It was 5 miles east of New Haven. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It was located at Sections 2 & 3, Twp. 44 N, R. 2 W, on Highway 100 east of the junction with 155.

Elmont

Elmont was in the southwest corner of the county, 5-1/2 miles west of Sullivan. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It was located at Section 3, Twp. 40 N, R. 3 W, on Highway H west of the junction with 155.

Etlah

Etlah is on the Missouri Pac. R. R. It was laid out April 13, 1874, into two blocks of fourteen and twelve lots, respectively. Front Street and Main Street run parallel with the railroad, and Walnut, Elm and Cedar the other way. Etlah had a population of about 100 inhabitants (1888). (--Hist. of Franklin Co., p. 341.)

It is about midway between New Haven and Berger. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

Etlah was established in 1864, on St. Patrick's Day to be exact, and Morris D. Rose was the first postmaster. (--The Empire that Missouri Pacific Serves, p. 208.)

It is located at Section 20, Twp. 45 N, R. 3 W, on Highway Z north of 100.

Mail via Berger. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[6]

Evans Mine

Evans Mine was east of St. Clair midway between St. Clair and Calvey. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #28; Hist. of Franklin Co., p. 208.)

It was located at Section 33, Twp. 42 N, R. 1 E.

Flint Hill (not a town, elevation 798 feet)

It is near Beaufort P. O. (--Hist. of Franklin Co., p. 204.)

Fort Williams

Fort Williams was southwest of Gray's Summitt. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #28.)

Franklin

See Pacific.

George

It was 11-1/2 miles south of St. Clair. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

Gerald (elevation 890 feet)

Gerald is in the western part of the county, near Gasconade County line. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Sections 1, 2, 11 & 12, Twp. 42 N, at the junction of Highways 50, Y & H.

Gildehouse

Gildehouse is in the northeast part of the county 6 miles south of Boles. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Section 8, Twp. 43 N, R. 1 E, on Highway Z west of M.

Mail via Villa Ridge. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[7]

Gray Summitt

Originally called "Gray's Summit" (q. v.), this town was named for Daniel Gray who came from New York and started a hotel in 1845. It is the highest point on the Missouri Pacific's main line between St. Louis and Kansas City, and also is one of two places in Missouri where a railroad tunnel runs beneath the town.

Gray Summitt is the location for the Ralston Purina research farm for the collection of scientific data in farm feeding. A mile west of town is the 1600-acre branch of the Missouri Botanical Garden, created by a trust set up by the late Henry B. Shaw of St. Louis. Here are cultivated orchids and other plants displayed in the Gardens in St. Louis. (--The Empire that Missouri Pacific Serves, p. 213.)

Gray's Summitt (now known as Gray Summitt [q. v.] )

Gray's Summitt was so named from Daniel Gray, who began keeping a hotel in the vicinity about 1845, and because it is the highest point on the line of the Missouri Pacific Railroad in this part of the state. The first settler in the immediate vicinity of Gray's Summitt, but not inside the limits of the town, was Henry Wolf, and the first settler inside the limits of the town was Patterson Lollar, who came here about 1852, and built the first house, a frame one, two stories high and about 18 x 20 feet in dimensions. The first merchants were Vollmer* & Berthold, who kept a store and saloon. The first blacksmiths were Hogler & Ziteman, and the first shoemaker, Herman Koch...The first postmaster was Judge J. M. King. * also spelled Volliner. (--Hist. of Franklin Co., p. 338.)

It was laid off in 1895 and had 1 store; it is 41 miles from St. Louis. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 204.)

It is located at Section 6, Twp. 43 N, R. 2 E, on Highways I-44 and 100.

Generally

The town with this unique name was east of Dry Branch. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #28 (1874).)

Goloonda Mine

It was east of Krakow. (--Hist. of Franklin Co., p. 209; New Atlas of Mo., Map #28.)

Griswold

This post-office was listed in Postal Guide of Missouri, 1842. Location is unknown.

[8]

Grubville

Grubville is 12 miles south of Robertsville, and had 1 store (1874). (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 204.)

It was at the eastern edge of the county on Jefferson County line. (--New Atlas of Mo., 1874, Map #28.)

Grubville is now in Jefferson County. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Hemker

Hemker was mentioned on page 342, Hist. of Franklin Co. (Location is unknown).

Huff
Huff was in the southeastern part of the county, south of Mounthope. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It was located at Section 35, Twp. 41 N, R. 1 E, on an unmarked county road west of 47.

Iron Hill

Iron Hill was west of Moselle. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #28.)

Japan

Japan is 10 miles northeast of Sullivan. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 204.)

It is in the southwest corner of the county near Crawford County line. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Section 6, Twp. 40 N, R. 3 W, at the junction of Highways H & J.

Mail via Sullivan. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Jeffriesburg

It is in the central part of the county, 5-1/2 miles west from Union. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387; Gazetteer of Mo., p. 204.)

It is located at Sections 25 & 36, Twp. 43 N, R. 2 W & Section 30, Twp. 43 N, R. 1 W, on Highway 50.

Jeffriesburg is a family name. E. B. Jeffries was a member of the Legislature from Franklin County in 1854. He was killed in the Gasconade Bridge disaster, November 1, 1855. (--Eaton, p. 167.)

It has no population. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[9]

Kiel

Kiel is in the northwest section of the county, 7-1/2 miles southwest of New Haven. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Section 34, Twp. 44 N, R. 3 W, on Highway C west of YY.

Mail via New Haven. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Johnstown

This post-office town is listed in U. S. Postal Guide, 1842. (Location is unknown).

Kohl

Kohl was in the northwestern part of the county on R. F. D. from New Haven, near Gasconade County line. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

Krakow

Krakow, an old town first mentioned in Hist. of Franklin Co., p. 204, is 6 miles south of Washington, and 5 miles north of Union. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 204; The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Section 8, Twp. 43 N, R. 1 W, at the junction of A & YY.

Mail via Washington. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Labaddie (elevation 526 feet, originally L'Abaddie)

Labaddie, so named from the hunter Labaddie, lost in the vicinity, is situated at the intersection of the Missouri Pacific and Kansas City & Colorado Railroads (now a part of the Missouri Pac. R. R.)...By the latter it is forty-five and nine-tenths miles from St. Louis. Among the first settlers in the vicinity were Michael Crowe, George Pursley, and others including James North. The first house was a log one, 12 x 16 feet. James North is believed to have built the first frame house. The first blacksmith was Henry Bluemberg, and the first shoe-maker Alvin Cardwell. William Thomas was the first grocery keeper. (--History of Franklin Co., p. 339.)

It was laid off in 1855 and had 1 store (1874). (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 204.)

It is in the northeastern corner of the county, 3-1/2 miles north of Gray Summitt. The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Sections 30, 31, R. 2 E & Section. 25, R 1 E, Twp. 44 N, at the junction of M & MM.

[10]

Point L'Abaddie was named for the early French settler, Sylvester L'Abaddie, who came to St. Louis in 1769 and married one of the Chouteau sisters. He became a prominent merchant in the city, dying in 1794. (--Eaton, p. 167.)

The name was changed to Labaddie as of November 1, 1929. (--Missouri Manual, 1929-30, p. 939.)

Leslie (elevation 820 feet)

Leslie is located at Section 2, Twp. 42 N, R. 3 W, on Highway 50, west of 155.

Little Maramec

It was a post-office 10 miles south of Robertsville. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 204.)

Lone Dell

Lone Dell is in the southeast corner of the county, 8 miles south from Moselle. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Section 8, Twp. 41 N, R. 2 E, at the junction of N & 50.

Luther

Luther was a post-office 10 miles southwest from Union. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 204.)

Luther, now St. Louis Co. independent city (part of St. Louis). (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Luebbering

Luebbering is a post-office in the southeastern part of the county, approximately 13 miles north from Moselle. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It was named in honor of John F. Luebbering, postmaster and merchant. (--Eaton, p. 168.)

It is located at Section 20, Twp. 41 N, R. 2 E, on FF south of the junction with 50.

Lyon

Lyon is in the northwest section of the county, southeast of New Haven on R. F. D. from New Haven and Campbellton. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Section 5, Twp. 43 N, & Twp. 44 N, R. 2 W on 155 north of YY.

Mail via New Haven. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[11]

Mackie

Mackie is mentioned on page 342 of History of Franklin Co., 1888. Location is unknown.

Massie

Massie was east of Stanton, in Central Township. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #28.)

Maune's Store

It was 3 miles northwest of Union; had 1 store (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 204.)

Maupin (No. 1)

It is in the southeast corner of the county near Jefferson County line. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It is located at Section 3, Twp. 40 N, R. 2 E.

Mail via Grubville. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

It was named for an early settler. (--Eaton, p. 168.)

Maupin (No. 2)

Another Maupin is located at Section 27, Twp. 44 N, R. 3 W, on Highway C north of YY in the western section of the county.

Miller's Landing

See New Haven. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 204.)

Monday

Monday was in the southern part of the county, near the Washington County line. It was 7-1/2 miles west of George. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

Morrelton

Morellton was 6 miles southwest of St. Clair or 5 miles northeast of Stanton. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 387.)

It was located at Section 9, Twp. 41 N, R. 1 W, on an unmarked county road south of I-44.

[12]

Moselle (elevation 483 feet)

Moselle, on the A. & P. R. R. (Frisco), 9 miles from Pacific was laid off in 1859, and had a population of about 300...It had about 5 stores. This was the shipping point for the Moselle Iron Works, which were about one mile distant, on the Meramec River. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 204.)

It is located at Section 15, Twp. 42 N, R. 1 E, on AH, southeast of 66.

It is a rural branch of Union and has been disincorporated since 1950. (--Rand, McNally, 1974; also, see History of Franklin Co., pp. 340, 341.)

Moselle Iron Furnace

It was located at Section 14, Twp. 42 N, R. 1 E, three-fourths of a mile of Moselle Station. (--History of Franklin Co., p. 210.)

Mount Hope Mine

It was south of Evans. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #28.)

It was in Sections 3 & 4, Twp. 41 N, & Section 28, Twp. 42 N, R. 1 E. (--History of Franklin Co., p. 208.)

Mount Vernon

It was a town laid out before Washington but soon afterward abandoned. (--History of Franklin Co., p. 305.) (Location unknown).

Neier

Neier is an old town; it is mentioned in History of Franklin Co., p. 342.

It is located at Section 14, Twp. 42 N, R. 2 W on an unmarked county road between EE & UU.

It was named for Franz Neier, one time civil engineer on the St. Louis & Union, now a part of Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific R. R. (--Eaton, p. 168.)

Mail via Union. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[13]

New Haven (elevation 510 feet)

New Haven is situated on the Missouri Pacific Railway, thirteen miles above Washington. In the early annals of the county it was known as Miller's Landing, named from Phillip Miller, one of the early settlers in the county. The name New Haven was applied to it when it was laid out as a town, in 1856, at the suggestion of William O. Ming. New Haven was incorporated July 12, 1881. (--History of Franklin Co., pp. 330, 331; Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 204.)

Established in 1858, and named for a town in New England, New Haven was one of the communities along the Missouri River, which came into being with the projection of the Pacific Railroad across the state from St. Louis to Kansas City. A gala day in New Haven's early history was September 20, 1865, when the Pacific Railroad operated its first passenger train from Kansas City to St. Louis in the then astounding time of about 18 hours. There was a monster celebration in New Haven that day, with the Silver Cornet Band and the mayor and city officials and most of the residents gathered at the station to see the train... (--The Empire that Missouri Pacific Serves, p. 237.)

It is located at Section 36, Twp. 45 N, R. 3 W, on Highways C, E & 100.

New Port

See Dundee. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 204.)

Noser Mill

Noser Mill was located at Section 7, Twp. 42 N, R. 2 W, on U south of 50.

Oakfield

Oakfield was situated about four miles north of Pacific and was so named from the large number of oak trees growing about the place. The first residence was built there about 1842, by Frederick Stines. It was a log house, one story, and 20 x 30 feet. The first blacksmith was Gustafus Huffschmidt. (--History of Franklin Co., p. 341.)

It was a post-office 4 miles northeast of Gray's Summitt. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 204.)

Oetters

Oetters is located at Section 16, Twp. 44 N, R. 2 E, on Highway T northeast of Labaddie.

[14]

Pacific City

Pacific City was originally laid out November 29, 1852, as the town of Franklin. William C. Inks was the proprietor, who purchased the land from Thomas Watson, the original owner...

Among the first to settle in Pacific, or Franklin, as the town was known for some years, were William Mauthe, Jacob Mauthe, and others. The first house built in the town was a log one built on Second and Osage Streets. It was built by Thomas Watson, in 1854. It was frequently called "Buzzard's Roost." The first merchant in the town was J. R. Eoff, who kept a general store in a one-story frame building. The first blacksmith in the town was John Bluch in 1855. The first drug store was kept by Dr. Louis Schwarz, in 1855...One of the first teachers in the town, if not the first, was Benjamin Smith...

The first hotel was the Franklin House, built by William Mauthe. This house was the first commenced in the town of Pacific, but not the first completed, the first completed being the one spoken of above as the "Buzzard's Roost". (--History of Franklin Co., pp. 317, 318, 319.)

A meeting of the Franklin town board was held January 29, 1859, at the school house...At this meeting a resolution was passed that the name of the town of Franklin be changed to that of Pacific. The question of changing the name was debated for several weeks, as it was thought that an expense would be incurred. Finally a petition to the Legislature was circulated to change the name and incorporate the town, on the understanding that if there should be any additional expense in changing the name to Pacific, the owner of the town, William C. Inks, would pay the same. (--History of Franklin Co., p. 327; Gazetteer of Mo., p. 204.)

This town was called Franklin when laid out in November 1852. Seven years later, when the town was incorporated the name was changed to Pacific for the Pacific Railroad, then being laid across Missouri to Kansas City. The change in name undoubtedly was occasioned by the necessity of avoiding conflict with other towns with the same name. (The present Franklin, Missouri, is north of Boonville on the other side of the Missouri River.) (--The Empire that Missouri Pacific Serves, p. 238.)

It is located at Secs. 1, 2, 13, & 14, Twp. 43 N., R. 2 E on Business 66 & F.

Parkway

Parkway is at the southeast edge of St. Clair at Section 36, Twp. 42 N, R. 1 W on Highway 30.

Mail via St. Clair. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[15]

Piney Park

Piney Park is located at Secs. 8 & 17, Twp. 41 N, R. 1 E on Highway K, south of St. Clair.

Mail via St. Clair. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Port Hudson

It is 12 miles northwest of Union. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 204.)

It is located at Section 22, Twp. 43 N, R. 3 W on C north of 50.

Mail via New Haven. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Point Lookout

This is a post-office mentioned in U. S. Postal Guide, 1842. Location is unknown.

Point Royal

It was in the extreme northeast tip of the county near Jefferson County line. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #28.)

Reedville

Reedville was a small mining town situated in Twp. 40 N, R.1 W, built by the Missouri Lead Mining Company. The first mine was opened here in 1860, at which time the first house was built. The town sprang up rapidly from nothing to a town of about 333 inhabitants. It contained a large store, owned by the company above named, and a blacksmith shop and school house...During the years 1865, 1866, 1867, this town was one of the most flourishing in the county...About 1868 the town began to go down, and now (1888), it presents a deserted and desolate appearance...Its general appearance is that of a deserted ranch. (--History of Franklin Co., p. 338.)

The area of Reedville described is in Meramec State Park. (--General Highway Map of Franklin Co.)

Rengel

Rengel was a town named in History of Franklin Co., p. 342.

Location is unknown.

[16]

Robertsville (elevation 510 feet)

Robertsville is forty-one miles from St. Louis and 510 feet above sea level. It was named in honor of M. J. Roberts, on whose farm the town was laid out and built. Mr. Roberts settled here in 1831. In partnership with W. S. Gauge he commenced merchandising here in 1859. Mr. Gauge was the first postmaster in the town from about 1860 to 1864...The first blacksmith was George Cable...He was postmaster ca. 1866. The first mill at Robertsville was built in 1859, and was both a saw and grist mill owned and managed by Robert Spaulding. Later in 1888 owned by Franklin Null... (--History of Franklin Co., p. 340.)

It is located at Section 5, Twp. 42 N, R. 2 E, at the junction of N, O, & AP.

Rogerstown

Rogerstown is listed in U. S. Postal Guide, 1842. Location is unknown.

St. Alban's

It was located in the extreme northeast corner of the county, on Missouri River, at Section 2, Twp. 44 N, R. 2 E, on an unmarked county road from Highway E.

Dr. Peter Kincaid, a Scotsman, and a very prominent physician and surgeon, who had served under Napoleon Bonaparte, settled on the Missouri River in 1818, and in 1837 laid off St. Alban's, which was washed away in the great flood of 1844. (--History of Franklin Co., p. 225.)

St. Clair (elevation 757 feet)

This town, originally known as Traveler's Repose, is situated on the St. Louis & San Francisco Railway, eighteen miles from Pacific. The first settler in this location was B. J. Inge, in 1849. William Kerr came in 1854, and J. N. Inge in 1855. The name of the place was changed to St. Clair, in honor of a resident engineer of the Southwestern Branch Railroad. The town is situated on Section 3, Township 42 N, Range 1 west...William and D. M. Kerr were the first merchants in the place, having started a store in 1858, which they ran about two years. (--History of Franklin Co., pp. 333, 334; Gaz. of Missouri, p. 205.)

It covers several sections in Township 42 N, R. 1 W, at the junction of I-44, 66, 47, 39, AB & PP.

[17]

St. John

St. John was west of Casco. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #28.)

Senate Grove

It is in the northwest corner of the county north of Boeuf Creek. (--Map of Mo., 1917, Rand, McNally.)

Mail via New Haven. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Shotwell

Shotwell, located in Twp. 43 N, R. 3 W, was so named by John Seaton, the first postmaster, from an incident which occurred in the pioneer days of the county. Mr. Alexander and an old Mr. Wages, pioneer settlers, each claimed the same deer lick, and both went to it one night to kill deer. The deer failed to appear, and, after waiting for a long time, each became aware of the other's presence. They soon began firing at each other, and fired away all their ammunition, without personal injury to each other. Shortly after this exciting, but as it turned out, harmless episode, Mr. Seaton was appointed postmaster, and in honor of such good shooting, named the post-office Shotwell. The little village was built some years afterward, and the name was, as a matter of course, applied to the village. The first house was erected by John Schweer, who was also the first merchant of the little town. Both the first business house and the first residence were built of logs. (--History of Franklin Co., p. 337.)

It was a post-office 17 miles southwest of Union and had 1 store (1874). (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 205.)

South Point

South Point on the Missouri Pacific R. R., 16 miles from Franklin (Pacific) had 2 stores, 1 saw-mill, 1 box factory and an excelsior factory. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 205.)

Mail via Washington. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Spring Bluff

This old town, first mentioned in History of Franklin Co., , p. 342, was a post-office 12 miles southwest of Union. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p.205.)

It was located at Section 14, Twp. 41 N, R. 3 W at the junction of AC & 155.

[18]

Stanton

Stanton is located on the St. L. & S. F. R. R., in Twp. 41 N, R. 2 W. It was named for a Mr. Stanton, who at one time had a powder mill in the vicinity. Charles Gallaher was the first settler in this part of the county, but the first house was built by Bennett Thurmond in 1866. It was a framebuilding, 20 x 36 feet with an L. The first merchant was Bennett Thurmond, who kept a general store, selling drugs as well as produce. Nurray & Thurmond opened a blacksmith shop in 1867. Among the first postmasters was Bennett Thurmond...Bennett Thurmond, as well as being the first merchant was also the first hotel keeper. (--History of Franklin Co., p. 339.)

Stanton is located at Secs. 23, 24, 25 & 26, Twp. 41 N, R. 2 W, at the junction of Highways W, 66 & I-44.

Stanton Copper Mines

Stanton Copper Mines was a post-office 4 miles south of Stanton (1874). (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 205.)

Strain

Strain was located at Section 18, Twp. 41 N, R. 3 W, at the junction of H & AC, in the southwest corner of the county.

Sullivan

Sullivan is situated on the St. L. & S. F. R. R., in the extreme southern part of the county. It is in the southwest quarter of Section 9, Twp. 40 N, R. 2 W. The original proprietor of the town was Stephen Sullivan and his wife, and the town, laid out by him in 1859, was named after him by the railway company because of his having given the land for the depot grounds and built the depot himself...

The first house was built in the town in 1859, by Stephen Sullivan. It was a one-story or one-and-a-half story frame building 20 x 40 feet in size. The first merchant was J. C. McAllister; first druggist, Dr. A. Lane; first blacksmith, D. S. Skaggs; first shoemaker, Joseph Bialke; first hotel keeper, Samuel Melivern, who opened his hotel in 1860. The first postmaster was J. D. McFadden... (--History of Franklin Co., pp. 335, 336, 337.)

It is on the Crawford-Franklin Co. line, Twp. 40 N, R. 2 W, at the edge of Meramec State Park.

Tavern Rock

Tavern Rock was south of Point Royal. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #28.)

[19]

Traveler's Repose

See St. Clair.

Union (elevation 565 feet)

Union, the county seat of Franklin County, was laid out in 1826, and made the county seat in 1827...The town was originally laid off by Brackett Barnes and Moses Wiltmire into forty-two blocks and seven fractional blocks. Two streets ran east and west through the town, and two north and south, the court-house square between each pair of streets, each street being sixty feet wide.

Nathan Richardson was one of the first inhabitants of Union. Wilson McCuen was also one of the first, having a blacksmith shop...William Walker had a general store in 1830, and a large flour mill on the Bourbeuse...The first hotel was started by Ambrose Ranson; it stood near the southwest corner of the public square, and the house in which it was kept was believed to be the first built in town. Union was incorporated in 1846...By-laws were adopted May 28, 1849. (--History of Franklin Co., pp. 295, 296, 299.)

The county court met for the last time at New Port on November 7, 1826, and for the first time at Union, at the house of A. Ranson, June 25, 1827...(--History of Franklin Co., p. 287.)

Union is located at Secs. 26, 27, 22 & 34, Twp. 43 N, R. 1 W, at the junction of 47 & 50.

Villa Ridge (elevation 637 feet)

Villa Ridge is located at Secs. 14 & 15, Twp. 43 N, R. 1 E, on M between 100 & 66 - I-44.

Virginia Mine

It was 12 miles southeast of Union and had 1 store (1874). (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 205.)

It was located at Section 16, Twp. 41 N, R. 1 E. (--History of Franklin Co., p. 208.)

Wallent

Wallent was in the southwest corner of the county, northwest of Strain. (--Map of Mo., 1917, Rand, McNally.)

[20]

Washington (elevation 510 feet)

The town was first settled prior to 1818 and incorporated in 1841; the first brick house...was erected in 1834 by a Mr. Thomas. In 1874, Washington contained 8 churches--3 Lutheran, 2 Presbyterian, 1 Methodist, 1 Presbyterian (colored), 1 Catholic Church (at that time the finest church in the state outside St. Louis), a public school building, a Catholic school, 1 brick town-house, 4 brick hotels, about 45 business firms, etc. (--Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, pp. 205, 206.)

The portion of the present (1888) City of Washington which was first laid out was what was and still (1888) is known as Bassora (q. v.)...The original town of Washington was laid out the 29th day of May, 1839, for the proprietor Mrs. Lucinda Owens. This town lies in Section 22, Township 44, Range 1 West, and the plat filed May 29, 1839, was recorded October 1, 1858. Several additions were made from time to time. Owens' addition was made April 9, 1863. It lies between the original town of Washington and Bassora. Siegel Avenue runs through this addition and connects Second Street in Bassora with Third Street in Washington...It is not easy to state who was the first white man to settle in what is now Washingon Township or City, but in 1834 C. Eberius erected a frame building, the first built in the town. The first brick building in the town was built by Phineas Thomas, in 1836...He was the first blacksmith, establishing his shop in 1835...

The first ferry-boat in the vicinity of Washington was run across the Missouri River, about one mile above the present (1888) ferry landing at Mount Vernon, a town laid off before Washington, but soon afterward abandoned. This ferry was owned by a Mr. Murphy, and consisted of two log canoes, about thirty feet long, and placed side by side, with a platform on top. This was the first ferry on the Missouri River above St. Charles... (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 205.)

It covers several sections in Twp. 44 N, R. 1 W, at the junction of Highways 47, 100 & A.

It was named for George Washington and it enjoys the distinction as the world's largest producer of corncob pipes. (--The Empire that Missouri Pacific Serves, p. 253.)



Franklin County Table of Contents
Springfield-Greene County Library