A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Hickory County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


[1]

The oldest post-office in the county is Quincy--called Judy's Gap--, and the youngest is Galmey, established in 1887. In the following list, except those mentioned above the mails are kept at farm houses: Almon, Cornersville, Cross Timbers, Elkton, Galmey, Hermitage, Lone Spring, Pittsburg, Preston, Quincy, Roney, Weaubleau, and Wheatland. (--State of Missouri, History of Hickory County, Goodspeed, 1889, pp 252-253.)

(The names italicized had regular post-offices.)

Almon (formerly known as Goose Neck)

This village is not laid out and platted as a town. It is in the North East quarter of Section 14, Township 37, Range 20, on little Niangua Creek. The land on which it is situated was entered August 9, 1853. The first men who sold goods there were George C. Dunn and George W. Mabary, about 1870. A water mill was built around 1854, by either Williams or Amox Paxton. A Post Office was established in 1868, with Daniel J. Parks as Postmaster, and the name given to it was "Goose Neck." (--State of Missouri, History of Hickory County, p. 50.)

Avery

This village is situated on the line between the counties of Hickory and Benton, in Section 9, Township 38, Range 22. The first stock of goods brought there was opened by Wright & Rash, February 10, 1890. This store was opened in one room of George W. Wright's residence, about one mile East of the present site of the village. Sometime in the summer of 1889, a Post Office at the residence of John M. Breshears, was established and he was the first Postmaster. This was ont he Benton County side of the county line. It was kept there about a year, when George W. Wright was appointed Postmaster, and the office was moved over into Hickory County to Mr. Wright's store. John A. Breshears was later appointed Postmaster, and moved the office over into Benton County. About 1897, William A. Byrum built the first store building on the present (1907) site, and was appointed Postmaster, and the Post Office was again moved to Hickory County. He put in a stock of goods with John A. Jones as manager, which later was burned. One store is all there has ever been on this site, on the Hickory County side of the line. As of 1907 there were at least two stores there (on the Benton County side of the line), as well as a blacksmith shop. (--State of Missouri, History of Hickory County, pp. 50-51.)

[2]

Black Oak Point

Black Oak Point, six miles east of Hermitage, was a thriving place, but was wholly destroyed during the Civil War. It now contains 1 store (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, p. 234.)

It is now known as Preston (q.v.). (--State of Missouri, History of Hickory County, p. 250.)

Bledsoe

In Montgomery Township. Approximately 3 miles northeast of Wheatland, and about 5 miles southeast of Quincy. (--New Atlas of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, Map #26.)

See Wheatland.

Butcher (once known as Fairview)**

Butcher is at the west edge of the county.

It is located at Section 17, Township 37 N, Range 23 W, on Highway T, west of 83. (--Highway Map of Hickory County, issued by the Missouri State Highway Department, 4-26-67. Unless otherwise noted, all map descriptions are from this map.

** A member of the Hickory County Historical Society says that Butcher was formerly known as Fairview. (--Mrs. Nannie Jinkins, reporter.)

Childers

Childers was in the extreme northeast corner of the county, ten miles northeast of Cross Timbers, or six miles southwest of Climax Springs, (Camden Co.). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Walter Williams, p. 401.)

Cornersville

It was a post-office, 15 miles southwest of Hermitage. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 234.)

Cross Timbers (earlier known as Garden City)

Cross Timbers is 6 miles north of Preston, in the northeast part of the county. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 401.)

It is 8 miles northeast of Hermitage, or North Prairie, and was settled in 1870. As of 1874, it contained 2 stores, 1 steam saw and grist-mill. The population was about 150. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 234.)

It is located at Section 22, Township 38 N, Range 21 W, on Highways P & 65.

Mrs. Nannie Jinkins, of the Hickory County Historical Society says that Cross Timbers was once known as Garden City.

[3]

The original survey of this town was made in 1871by Isaac R. Clark, on the Southwest fourth of the Southwest quarter of Section 22, Township 38 N, Range 21 W. The forty acres was entered by James D. Donnell, July 29, 1853, but in 1871, it, with other lands adjoining belonged to Elisha Kirby. About the time Mr. Kirby had the town surveyed and platted he sold the farm and lands about town to Virgil S. Williams and built a residence on the town survey near where the residence of Mrs. W. H. Scruggs now (1907) stands. Mr. Kirby sold out and moved to the State of Texas about 1874. The plat of the survey of the town was recorded by the record was burned in the court house fire, January 6, 1881, and it has not been re-recorded, which makes it difficult to trace title to lots in the old survey or additions. (--Wilson's History of Hickory County, pp. 51-52.)

Elkton

The lands on which this village stands have never been surveyed and platted as a town. The store building of Kelley & Williams is near the Northwest corner of the Northwest fourth of the Northeast quarter of Section 26, Township 36 N, Range 23 W, and all of the buildings on the West side of the road and South of that are on this forty acres. It was entered December 30, 1839, with the Northwest fourth of the Northwest quarter of Section 25, which lies East of it, by Samuel H. Arbuckles. There are also buildings on the East side of the road, all on the Northwest fourth of the Northwest quarter of the Northwest quarter of Section 25. There are also buildings on the Southwest fourth of the Southwest quarter of Section 24, which was entered by Archibald Blue, June 15, 1840, and on the Southeast quarter of Section 23, which was entered by Edward S. Whitehead, March 28, 1839. (--Wilson's History of Hickory County, p. 55.)

It is in the southwest corner of the county 8 1/2 miles north of Flemington, (Polk Co.). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 401.)

It is located at Section 23, Township 36 N, Range 23 W, on Highways J & 83.

It was named for the animal.(--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, Ramsay, p. 87.)

It is 12 miles south, southwest of Hermitage, and, as of 1874, it contained 1 store(--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 234).

[4]

Galmey

Galmey is a trading-point, not surveyed as a town, situated near the Northeast corner of the Northwest fourth of the Northwest quarter of Section 9, Township 36 N, Range 22 W. The first business there was a blacksmith shop run by William T. Bennett, who now (1907), has a shop in Hermitage. X X X A Post Office was established there in 1888 and Erasmus J. Kelley was the first postmaster. (--Wilson's History of Hickory County, pp. 56 - 57.)

It was near the center of the county, 8 miles northeast of Elkton, approximately 5 miles southwest of Hermitage. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 401.)

It was located at Section 9, Township 36 N, Range 22 W, on Highways 254 & V, northwest of Pomme de Terre River.

Goose Neck (now known as Almon, q.v.)

Goose Neck was a post-office about 14 miles east of Hermitage. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 234.)

Haran

Now known as Weaubleau, q.v..

Hermitage

Hermitage, the county seat, is situated near the center of the county, on the Pomme de Terre River, in the midst of the mining district and 45 miles from Lebanon, Laclede Co., the nearest railroad station. It was settled in 1846 or 1847, and became the county seat by vote of the people, March 15th, 1847, the title being acquired by purchase from Thomas Davis. It was incorporated, but the law is not now (1874) in force. It has 1 school, 1 steam saw and grist mill, 4 stores and 1 printing office. Population (1874), about 200. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 234.)

It is thought the circuit court first met in Hermitage, during the latter part of the summer of 1845. It was held in Thomas Davis' house, in the southeast part of town...The Grand Jury was impaneled, and retired for deliberation under a large tree nearby. The stump of the old tree is still there, (1889), something of a monument to the first Hickory County circuit court. (--State of Missouri, History of Hickory County, p. 234.)

[5]

Hermitage, the county seat, was surveyed and platted in 1847, included the Northwest fourth of the Southeast fourth of Section 23, Township 37, Range 22, and is within sixty rods of the center of the county. Williamson E. Dorman (Buck) moved his groceries and liquors, and the log house in which he had kept his store at Pittsburg to what is now Hermitage, before it was surveyed as a town, but he and William Waldo were in business here shortly after the town was surveyed. The exact date when the town was surveyed is not known, as the certificate made by the Surveyor, who surveyed it is not dated.

The land on which it was located was entered by Thomas Davis, but was not entered until January 30, 1847. Thomas Davis, probably, settled the Southeast fourth of the Southeast quarter of Section 23, Township 37, Range 22, which corners with the town forty at the Southeast corner in 1843, or early in 1844, and built and lived in the log house now (1907) standing there, as early as 1844.

Along in those years mills were scarce and Mr. William E. Dorman, father of Williamson E. Dorman, built a mill run by oxen tramping a tread-mill, and could grind about 80 bushels of grain in a day. It stood about 40 feet South of where Albert Pitts now lives (1907). Later he and others built a steam mill near the South fork of the Pomme de Terre about a quarter of a mile from the public square. This mill did a good business, but was about worn out at the close of the Civil War, but continued to run until about 1874. Mr. Dorman and his son, Oliver L. Dorman, and Joseph S. Hartman, built a new steam mill on Block 13, in the North part of town; this continued to run until it was superceded in 1902 by a new mill built by Eugene Belknap, of Urbana, Missouri, which was burned June 28, 1906...The town has had many disastrous fires. (--Wilson's History of Hickory County, pp. 57-58.)

It is located at Section 23, Township 37 N, Range 22 W, on Highways 54 & 254, west of U.

It was named (1847) for "The Hermitage", home of Andrew Jackson. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, Ramsay, p. 52.)

[6]

Jordan

This is a trading-point started in 1904 by the building of a steam flouring mill. The main promoter being George W. Jordan of Drakeville, Iowa, who was assisted by George T. Pulliam and W. P. Clifford of Appanoosa County, Iowa. Mr. Jordan came here in 1904 and he with his associates in Iowa, formed a joint stock company with $5,000 or 50 shares of $100 each...It is situated near Stark Creek near the Southeast corner of Section 20, and the Southwest corner of Section 21, Township 38, Range 20, and about five miles directly east of Cross Timbers. At this time (1907) the mill is owned and operated by James N. Stark and George W. Huffman, and they manufacture flour, meal and chops, buy corn and wheat, cattle, hogs, and horses and are doing a prosperous business.

There are two General Stores, one kept by J. J. Bradbury and the other by William H. Ashley, and both are doing a nice and profitable business. (--Wilson's History of Hickory County, pp. 61, 62.)

It is located at Sections 20 & 21, Township 27 N, Range 20 W, on Highway P, east of VV.

Judy's Gap

See Quincy. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 234.)

Lone Spring

It is four and one-half miles southeast of Preston, and seven miles northwest of Urbana, (Dallas County). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 401.)

It MAY have been located at Section 36, Township 37 N, Range 21 W, on or near Highway 65, since there seems to be a small settlement shown on the map.

Macedonia

It was the site of a Missionary Baptist Church, four miles north of where Wheatland now is. (--Wilson's History of Hickory County, p. 42.)

Nemo

This is a trading-point and Post Office, 7 miles Southeast of Hermitage on the Hermitage and Buffalo road, at the crossing of the Warsaw and Buffalo road. A good district school house was built by the Baptist people in 1892. A blacksmith shop was built there several years ago, (date unknown). The first store was run by Thomas Bridges in 1896. (--Wilson's History of Hickory County, p. 62.)

It is 6 miles south and east of Hermitage. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 401.

It is located at Sections 8 & 17, Township 36 N, Range 21W, on Highways 65, D, & NN.

[7]

Pittsburg (also spelled Pittsburgh)

This place was no doubt named Pittsburg because a number of the Pitts family settled near it before the county was organized. It is situated on the corners of four forty acre tracts of land, to-wit: Southeast corner of Southeast fourth of the Southeast quarter of Section 25, and Northeast corner of the Northeast fourth of the Northeast quarter Section 36, Township 26, Range 22, and on the Southwest corner of the South half Lot 2, of Southwest quarter of Section 30, (S. W. 1-4 S. W. qr.) and on the Northwest corner of the North half of Lot 2, Northwest quarter of Section 21, (N. W. 1-4 N. W. qr.) Township 36, Range 21.)

The first man who sold goods there was Charles F. Friend, and he kept his store in a small log house that he built near where the East end of the Creed hotel now stands, (1907). He was there until after 1846, for he was appointed Justice of the Peace of that Township in 1846. A more substantial store building was built by John L. Hall a short distance North of where Friend's building stood, probably as early as 1844. John L. Hall was afterwards elected Judge of the County Court of this county and was later a wholesale merchant in Sedalia, Mo.

Andrew J. Pitts came to the neighborhood in 1845, with the family of his father, Burrell Pitts, from the state of Mississippi, near Vicksburg. Dillard Pitts and Young Mims Pitts, sons of Jack Pitts had been there four or five years. Lewis Edwards then lived on the high hill South of Pittsburg and Charles lived in the log house mentioned and sold goods in one room of it. William M. Dorman had made settlement and lived near a spring on what is now the Joe Davis farm a little Northwest of town. A man by the name of Beavers lived about a quarter of a mile West of where the business part of the town now is, (1907). The first school house in the neighborhood was South of the road at the John Jump old place about a mile South of where the town now is.

Williamson E. Dorman had a small log building there in which he kept what was then a "Grocery", the principal goods kept being sugar, coffee, spices and pepper and white whiskey. When the excitement arose about the county seat going to be located at Hermitage, in 1846, Mr. Dorman hauled his house and store and all to Hermitage, and after clearing away the post oak brush where the residence of Mrs. Nannie F. Blair now (1907) stands in Hermitage, rebuilt his house and run (sic) his Grocery store. (--Wilson's History of Hickory County, pp. 62-63.)

It is four and one-half miles southwest of Nemo and three miles north of Sentinel, (Polk Co.). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 401.)

It is located at Section 23, 30, Township 36 N, Range 21 W, on Highways 64 & J.

[8]

Pittsburg is not much more than a post-office hamlet. The place received its name from the Pitts family, of whom there are numerous members in the neighborhood. It is south and a little east of Hermitage, about 7 miles, at the corner of Sections 25, 30, 31, & 36, on the range line between Ranges 21 & 22. The first settler on the spot was W. E. Dorman, and he opened a trading-place. In 1845, he picked himself up and the entire settlement, and removed to Hermitage, and for some time, the place was the "deserted village". (--State of Missouri, History of Hickory County, 1889, Goodspeed, p. 252.)

It is eight miles south of Hermitage, and contained 1 store, 1874. (It is also spelled Pittsburgh). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, p. 234.)

Preston (formerly called Black Oak)

Preston, formerly called Black Oak, was platted by S. C. Howard and R. I. Robinson, December 8, 1857, on the southeast corner of the northeast Section 22, and part of the southwest Section 23, Township 37, Range 21. (--State of Missouri, History of Hickory County, p. 250.)

The town survey of this town is situated on the Southeast fourth of the Northeast quarter of Section 22, and the Southwest fourth of the Northwest quarter of Section 23, Township 37, Range 21; it is about 18 feet over five miles and one-eighth of a mile East of Hermitage, the South line being with the North line of the town of Hermitage. The main street in the town running North is on the line between Section 22 and 23. The east side was entered by Richard I. Robinson, February 20, 1855, and on the West side of the street by Joshua Owen, December 7, 1849, but Silas C. Howard and Richard I. Robinson caused the town to be surveyed and platted by Daniel E. Davis, Deputy County Surveyor, under Benjamin H. Massey. It was laid out into eight blocks, block eight being designated church lot, and block 7, was not divided into lots. Blocks 7 and 8 are 211 1-3 feet square. The deed to the public for streets, etc., was made January 21, 1858, and was acknowledged before Amasa Curtis, J. P. Silas C. Howard was the first man to put in a store, and he and Richard I. Robinson were in business before the town was surveyed and afterwards up to the Civil War.

Several fires occurred in Preston during and after the Civil War. (--Wilson's History of Hickory County, pp. 65-66.)

Preston is in the east central portion of the county, 7 miles east of Hermitage. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 401.)

It is located at Section 23, Township 37 N, Range 21 W, on Highways 54, 65 and D.

[9]

Quincy (formerly known as Judy's Gap)

The land on which this town is situated was entered by Isaac M. Cruce, October 11, 1843, but the place was settled ten years or more before that time. William Kirkpatrick entered the West half of the Northwest quarter of Section 32, Township 38, Range 23, January 6, 1843, which lies less than a quarter of a mile West of town. Gladis Nowell and Ephraim Jamison entered tracts North and Northwest of town in Section 15, December 30, 1843. The place before it was surveyed and platted went by the name of "Judy's Gap", because Samuel Judy had set up a blacksmith shop there, and operated it for several years and there was a gap or opening near this point between Hogle's Creek Prairie, and twenty-five mile prairie. Mortimer Payne succeeded Judy, and about that time Aaron Ripetoe put up a country store and secured the appointment as Postmaster. He was, no doubt, the first Postmaster within what is now Hickory County...The date of the survey of the town cannot be given, because the Deed Record containing the plat and the Surveyor's certificate was burned in the Court house fire, January 6, 1881. (--Wilson's History of Hickory County, pp. 68 & 69.)

Quincy, 12 miles west, northwest of Hermitage was settled in 1845. It is in the midst of a good agricultural district, and near mineral deposits, and contains 1 steam carding-mill, 1 steam saw and grist-mill, 2 stores, 1 Masonic Hall, and 1 school. (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, p. 234.)

Quincy has been a post-office since 1867. It was platted and probably named in 1848. ? Probably named for President John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), who died February 23 of the year it was laid out. There are 18 other places bearing the sixth president's middle name, which was favored by his admirers to distinguish him from his father President John Adams. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, p. 139.)

It is in the northwest part of the county, 6 miles from Terry, (St. Clair Co.). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 401.)

It is located at Section 22, 33, Township 38 N, Range 23 W, on Highway 83, approximately midway between Highway 54 and the Benton Co. line.

Roney

Roney was a post-office 14 miles north, northeast of Hermitage. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, p. 234.)

[10]

Weaubleau (formerly Haran or Haren)

This town is situated on lands in Section 11, Township 36, Range 24, entered by Wiliam Hawkins October 23, 1840. It was the earliest land entry in the Township, except two, the East half of the Northeast quarter of Section 1, and the other a part of the N. M. Durnell old farm Southeast of town. These entries were made in 1838 and 1839. The first town survey was made at the instance of the Rev. Emerson Barber, by Patrick Chancellor, County Surveyor, December 3, 1880, on the Northeast fourth of the Northeast fourth of the Southwest quarter, Section 11, and the name given to it was "Haren or Haran". The first addition to the town was caused to be surveyed by A. A. John, August 20, 1883, by Patrick Chancellor. This survey was an addition to "Haren", and was not described as being on any forty acres, but it was said to be South of "Haren". Several additions were made from time to time, the last addition being surveyed June 2, 1904. (--Wilson's History of Hickory County, pp. 70 & 71.)

The Kansas City, Osceola, and Southern Railroad, now Frisco, came in August 13, 1898. (--Wilson's History of Hickory County, p. 73.)

Weaubleau, at one time called Haran, was laid out on ten acres of the Northeast quarter of Northeast quarter of S. W. Section 11, Township 36, Range 24, and was platted by Emerson Barber, (date unknown). He was postmaster, a minister of the gospel and president of the Weaubleau Institute, a male and female academy under the auspices of the Christian denomination...W. L. Snidow, for a long time the able representative of Hickory County in the Legislature, settled the place in 1856. (--State of Missouri, History of Hickory County, 1889, Goodspeed, pp. 251, 252.

Weaubleau is in the Southwest part of the county, near the St. Clair Co. line, 5 miles from Collins and 6 miles from Gerster, (both in St. Clair Co.). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, pp. 501-401.)

It is located at Sections 11, 12, Township 36 N, Range 24 W, on Highways 54 & 123.

The name 'Weaubleau', is of Cherokee heritage. However, the origin and significance remain unsolved. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, pp. 39, 42, 119.)

[11]

Wheatland (at one time, Bledsoe)

In December, 1869, Frederick Kern and Joseph Naffziger, caused to be surveyed and laid off into a town, with streets, alleys, and a public square, the greater part of the Northeast fourth of the Southeast quarter of Section 24, Township 37, Range 23, exactly four and one-half miles West of Hermitage. Fred Kern built a dwelling in 1866, where the Wilson hotel now stands, (1907). Melville H. Cooper, perhaps, was about the first to build a business house, but not far from the same time, Wm. M.Dixon, Perry G. Snyder, Newman & Mendenhall, and John Sutter built business houses. Removing the prairie grass and sod, went on in a hurry, and it is difficult after a lapse of thirty-seven years to remember who was first or third.

About April 1, 1894, the Hickory County Bank was moved from Hermitage, and filed banking contract April 9, 1894, and commenced business in a splendid, new two-story brick building, which stood East of the public square, where the stone store building now stands, (1907). In about a year after the removal the bank building and all the furniture were burned, but the bank vault and safe saved the bank records, papers and funds from destruction. In a short time William H. Liggett, President of the bank, built the brick building now (1907) used by the bank, and the business was moved there, where it remains. (--Wilson's History of Hickory County, pp. 75 & 77.)

What is now the Wheatland office was "Bledsoe", kept at Bledsoe Montgomery's house, about 3 miles north of Wheatland. (--State of Missouri, History of Hickory County, p. 253.)

Wheatland, 5 miles west and the rival of Hermitage, is near the western part of the mining district, and is in the midst of a fine agricultural region. It was settled in 1868, incorporated in 1870 and contains 1 steam grist and saw-mill, 1 carding machine and cotton gin, 1 school, and about 4 stores. The population, (1874) was about 200. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, p. 234.)

Wheatland is 6 miles west of Hermitage, and in the West Central part of the county. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 401.)

It is located at Sections 19, 24, Township 37 N, on the line between Ranges 22 & 23 W, on Highways 83 & B.

It is named for the Agricultural Product. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, p. 84.)

Dooley Bend Neighborhood

It was about 5 miles southeast of Hermitage.(--Wilson's History of Hickory County, p. 42.)

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