A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Mississippi County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


Mississippi County

[1]

Alfalfa Center

Alfalfa Center is located at Sec. 22 & 27, Twp. 27 N, R. 17 E, at the junction of Highways K & Y, in the northern part of the county. (--General Highway Map of Mississippi County, issued by The Missouri State Highway Commission, 12-1-62. Unless otherwise noted all map descriptions are from this map.)

Anniston Elevation 315 feet

It is a village in St. James Twp., eight miles south of Charleston. In 1889 it had Methodist and Christian Churches, flouring mill, lumber and stave factory, medicine manufactory and three general stores. Population (estimated) 200, (1901). (--Encyclopedia of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conrad, Vol. 1, 51.)

It was named for Anniston, the county seat of Calhoun County, Alabama. (--How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named, David W. Eaton, Fourth Article, p. 330.)

It is 11 miles northeast of New Madrid Co. line, and 3 1/2 miles northeast of Whitney. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, Walter Williams, p. 449.)

It is located at Sec. 9, Twp. 25 N, R. 16 E, at the junction of Highways 77 & DD.

Baldwin

Baldwin was a post-office in 1856. (--U. S. Postal Guide). Location is unknown.

Belmont

Belmont, the terminus of the Belmont branch of the Iron Mountain R. R., on the Mississippi River, was laid out by a stock company in 1853. (--Hist. of Southeast Mo., 1888, Goodspeed, p. 469.)

It was named in honor of August Belmont, of New York. It had 1 hotel, 2 stores, 2 public schools and 1 Methodist-Episcopal Church. Population (1874) about 300. (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, p. 373.)

It is 7 miles northeast of Wolf Island. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, Walter Williams, p. 449.)

It is located at Sec. 32, Twp. 25 N, R. 18 E, on Highway 80.

Bertrand

Bertrand is situated on the Cairo Branch of the Iron Mountain Railroad (now Missouri Pacific) about six miles west of Charleston. It was laid out in 1859 by H. J. Deal, and had a population of about 200, (1888). (--Hist. of Southeast Mo., 1888, p.469.)

It is in the northwest part of the county, 6 miles east of Buckeye, or 6 1/2 miles northeast of Sikeston. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 449.)

[2]

Bertrand (Cont)

It is located at Sec. 8 & 9, Twp. 26 N, R. 15 E, at the junction of Highways 62 & B. See, also, How Mo. Counties, Streams and Towns Were Named, Eaton, Fourth Article, p. 330.

Bird's Point (also spelled Byrd's Point)

In 1808, Abraham Bird, who with his 4 sons, had in 1795 removed from Virginia to Cairo, began to make improvements at a point opposite on the Missouri shore, known still as Bird's Point. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 373.)

It is a village on the Mississippi River, in Ohio Township, twelve miles northeast of Charleston and two miles from Cairo, Illinois, on the opposite side of the river. It is one of the settlements in the county. The town was formerly known as Greenville and Birdsville. (--Encyclopedia of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conrad, Vol. 1, 278.)

The American State papers relate that John Johnson settled at Bird's Point, opposite Cairo, August 6th, 1800 by virtue of a grant from Henry Peyroux, commandant under the Spanish Government, but authorities conflict, and it seems doubtful to whom belongs the honor of making the first settlement in this county. Andrew Ramsey, of Henderson County, Kentucky, and his sons John, Andrew and James located at the present site of Norfolk in 1800. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 371.)

For seventeen years (late 1880's and early 1890's) the principal northern terminus of the Cotton Belt Railway (St. Louis Southwestern) was at Bird's Point ... In addition to a yard and transfer shed, the Cotton Belt constructed and maintained at Bird's Point a transfer incline and tracks for loading cars on steamers ... Transfer boat service, at Bird's Point presented many seemingly overwhelming difficulties. The transfer at Cairo, Ill., was a long and hard one. At high water it was almost ten miles across the river, at low water not over four or five. Ice gorges and high water frequently interrupted traffic for several days at a time. A stage of forty-nine feet on the Cairo gauge caused overflow of the tracks at Bird's Point. Four feet or less of low water on the Cairo gauge either interrupted or completely as long as two months at a time. (--A History of the St. Louis Southwestern Railway, 1957, pp. 24, 25.)

Bird's Point is located at Sec. 25, Twp. 27 N, R. 18 E, on Highway 62.

Birdville

See Greenville. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 373.)

[3]

Buckeye

Buckeye was in the northwest corner of the county, near Scott County line. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 449.)

Catalpa

Catalpa was the first station south of Bertrand on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. (--Map of Mo., 1903, Geo. F. Crum.)

Charleston

The town of Charleston was laid off by John Rodney, surveyor of Scott County, on May 11, 1837, on lands owned by Thankful Randol, Joseph Moore and W. P. Barnard ... The site was originally entered in 1830 or 1831 by Humphrey Watson, who built a small log house ... In a short time he sold the house and forty acres of land to Thankful Randol, who continued to reside upon it until her death ...

One of the most prominent and useful pioneers of Charleston was George Whitcomb who came to the county from Massachusetts in 1837. He located on the site of Belmont, where he remained until the organization of the county, when he removed to Charleston. (--Hist. of Southeast Mo., 1888, Goodspeed, p. 465.)

In 1874 Charleston had 12 stores, 1 grist mill, 3 hotels, 3 churches -- M. E. Church South, Catholic and Baptist; 1 public school, 1 good private school -- the Charleston Academy -- 1 newspaper. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 373.)

It is located at Sec. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 & 9, Twp. 26 N, R. 16 E, at the junction of Highways 60, 62, 77 & N.

Corner

Corner is located at Sec. 27, 28, 33 & 34, Twp. 25 N, R. 17 E, at the junction of Highways 77 & 80.

Coulter

Coulter was south of Wyatt on the St. Louis Southwestern Railroad. (--Map of Mo., 1903, Geo. F. Crum.)

Crosno

Crosno is northwest of Belmont. (--Map of Mo., 1903, Geo. F. Crum.) Mail via Charleston. (--Reference Guide of Mo., 1974, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Dennon's Mills

Dennon's Mills was in the southwest corner of the county on New Madrid County line. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally & Co.)

[4]

Deventer

Deventer was located at Sec. 9 & 10, Twp. 25 N, R. 17 E, on Highway E, in the eastern part of the county.

Dorena

Dorena is located at Sec. 20 & 29, Twp. 23 N, R. 17 E. in the southeast corner of the county, north of Island No. 6 at the junction of Highways PP & 77.

East Prairie

East Prairie is 6 1/2 miles northeast of Hough (New Madrid County). (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 449.)

It is located at Sec. 25, 26, 35 & 36, Twp. 25 N, R. 15 E. at the junction of Highways 80 & V.

Fuget

Fuget was north of Crosno on the Missouri Pacific R. R. (--Map of Mo., 1903, Geo. F. Crum.)

Greenville (Birdsville)

Greenville, (Birdsville) on the C. A. & T. R. R., opposite Cairo, Ill., with which it was connected by ferry, and 10 miles east, northeast of Charleston, was a new village containing 1 hotel, 1 general store and 1 livery stable. Population about 40 (1874). (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 373.)

Harrison

It was located in Sec. 29, Twp. 27 N, R. 17 E. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #30, with the aid of General Highway Map of Mississippi County.)

Henderson's Mound or Hough's Post Office

It was the second station north of New Madrid County line. (--Map of Mo., 1903, Geo. F. Crum.)

Henson

Henson was a station on the St. L. I. M. & S. R. R. (Mo. Pacific) 8 miles southeast of Charleston. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 373.) Mail via Charleston. (--Standard Ref. Guide of Mo., 1974, Rand, McNally & Co.)

[5]

Hibbard

Hibbard was laid out in 1883 by an improvement company. It was a station on the Texas, Arkansas & St. Louis Railway. (--History of Southeast Mo., 1883, p. 470.)

It is no longer listed.

Hopewell

Hopewell was in the northeast part of the county, on the Mississippi River, at Sec. 13, Twp. 25 N, R. 18 E. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #30, with the aid of General Highway Map of Mississippi County.)

Houghs

Houghs was a station on the C. A. & T. R. R., 6 miles east northeast of Charleston. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 373.)

It was listed as being in New Madrid County in 1904. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 459.) It is no longer listed.

Hough's Post Office

See Henderson's Mound. (--Map of Mo., 1903, Geo. F. Crum.)

Howletts

Howletts was south of Samos. (--Map of Mo., 1903, Geo. F. Crum.)

James Bayou (St. James)

It was on the Mississippi River, at the mouth of St. James Bayou, 20 miles south of Charleston. It had 2 stores, 1 hotel, 1 steam saw mill and 1 public school. Population about 75, 1874. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 373.) No longer listed.

Oak Grove

Oak Grove was located at Sec. 23, Twp. 25 N, R. 15 E. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #30, with the aid of General Highway Map of Mississippi Co.)

Medley

Medley was 5 miles south of Wolf Island, on the Mississippi River. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 449.) No longer listed.

[6]

Norfolk

Norfolk was the first town laid out in the county. It was established in November, 1836, by James Ramsey, William Lester and others, on the Mississippi, about six miles below the mouth of the Ohio. (--History of Southeast Mo., 1889, Goodspeed, pp. 469, 470.)

It had 1 store and 1 private school, and a population of 50 (1874). (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 374.)

It was located at Sec. 4, Twp. 26 N, R. 18 E. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #30, with the aid of Gen. Highway Map of Mississippi County.)

Ohio City

Ohio City was laid out on May 15, 1846, by Hiram Parsons, about one mile above Bird's Point, on the Mississippi River. (--Hist. of Southeast Mo., 1889, p. 470.)

It is no longer listed.

Rodney

Rodney was in the northeast corner of the county, in Tywappity Twp. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Rush's Ridge

It was located at Sec. 11, Twp. 26 N, R. 17 E. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #30, with the aid of Gen. Highway Map of Mississippi County.)

Samos

Samos is located at Sec. 25, Twp. 26 N, R. 16 E, on an unmarked county road and St. Louis Southwestern R. R.

St. James

See James Bayou. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 374.)

Selkirk

Selkirk was north of Hough's P. O., or Henderson. (--Map of Mo., 1903, Geo. F. Crum.)

Texas Bend

Texas Bend in Tywappity Bottom, 5 miles northeast of Charleston, inhabited chiefly by Germans, had 1 church -- Catholic and 1 public school. Population about 150, (1874). (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 374.) No longer listed.

[7]

Whiting

Whiting is located at Sec. 19, Twp. 25 N, R. 16 E, on Highway 105, north of East Prairie.

Mail via East Prairie. (--Standard Ref. Guide of Mo., 1974, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Wilson City

Wilson City is located at Sec. 5, Twp. 26 N, R. 17 E, on Highway Y north of Wyatt.

Wolf Island

Wolf Island, on the Mississippi River, 8 miles below Belmont, had 2 dry goods stores, 2 warehouses and a seminary. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 374.)

It is located at Sec. 10, Twp. 24 N, R. 17 E, at the junction of Highways 77 & AA.

Wolf Island No. 5

An island just below Belmont, and the largest in the Mississippi River, its area being about 5,000 acres. Although it has the appearance of being attached to Missouri, it belongs to Kentucky, that State having had its title to the island confirmed by the United States Supreme Court after a long and spirited contest with Missouri. (--Encyclopedia of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conrad, Vol. 6, p. 500.)

Wyatt

It is 5 1/4 miles southeast of Bird's Point. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 449.)

It is located at Sec. 9, Twp. 26 N, R. 17 E, at the junction of Highways 62, E & AA.


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