A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Newton County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


Newton County

[1]

 

Aroma

 

Aroma was on the section line between Sections 19,24,25 & 30, Township 25 N, Range 31 W, on Highway H, south of 86. (--General Highway Map of Newton County, issued by The Missouri State Highway Department, 1-12-67. Unless otherwise noted, all map locations are from this same map.)

 

Art

 

Art was approximately five miles northwest of McElhany. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Walter Williams, p. 461.)

 

Belfast

 

Belfast, a trading-point, was established about 1880 and was named for Belfast, Ireland, by a prominent Irish family there. (--Place Names.)

Belfast was approximately seven miles west of Neosho from which point it was by R.F.D. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

Belfast was located at Section 20, Township 25 N, Range 32 W, along the Frisco Railroad.

 

Berwick

 

Berwick, a trading-point established soon after the Civil War, was named for the owner of the store. (--Place Names.)

It was a station on the A. & P. R. R. (Frisco), eighteen miles east, northeast of Neosho. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 401.)

It was five miles east of Ritchey (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

It was located at Sections 26 & 35, Township 25 N, Range 29 W, on Highway JJ, north of 60.

There still is a church located at Berwick. (--Larry A. James)

 

Boulder City

 

Boulder City was named from the boulders near. (--Place Names.)

It was located at Section 23, Township 24 N, Range 31 W, at the junction of Highways D & H.

 

Burch

 

Burch was five miles west of McElhany. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

 

[2]

 

Capp's Creek (formerly Jollification).

 

It was eighteen miles east of Neosho and six miles Southwest of Pierce City. It had a population of about 50, a flouring mill, distillery and general store, (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 401.)

It was named for a pioneer settler. (--Place Names.)

A possible location is in Section 11, Township 25 N, Range 29 W. A few buildings are shown on this location; also Capp's Creek flows into Shoal Creek, near there.

 

Cartwell

 

Cartwell was two and one-half miles southwest of Kent, in the southeast corner of the county. (The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

 

Cave Springs (Village)

 

Cave Springs is named for the springs in the vicinity, one of which flows from a cave. (--Place Names.)

Cave Springs is located in Section 32, Township 26 N, Range 32 W. (--Larry A. James.)

 

Chester

 

Chester was three and one-half miles southeast of Newtonia. (The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

A possible location is in Section 4, Township 24 N, Range 30 W, near Highways 86 & HH. Several buildings are shown on the map at this location.

 

Dayton (See Racine). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 401.)

Dayton, (later Racine, q.v.)., was the name of a post-office which is now known as Racine. It was named for Dayton, Ohio. (--Place Names.)

Dayton or Racine, was 12 miles from Neosho on Lost Creek, and was the site in 1869 of Richard Gilstrap's saw and gristmills and wagon and blacksmith shops. The town of Dayton was platted on the Southeast quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 1, Township 25 N, Range 33 W, by Edgar Shroeder, surveyor for Richard Gilstrap, owner, and the plat recorded April 27, 1869. When Senecal Village came into existence old Dayton lost many of her citizens, except what were purely local. (--State of Missouri, History of Newton Co., Goodspeed, 1889, p. 390.)

 

[3]

 

Dessa

 

Dessa was located at Sections 17 & 18, Township 24 N, Range 33 W, on Highway Y, south of Highway 60.

 

Diamond (see below)

 

Diamond is five and three-fourth miles south of the Jasper County line, on the Ft. Scott Central Railroad. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

 

Diamond Grove

 

Diamond Grove was a beautiful grove in the shape of a diamond when the pioneers came. (--Place Names.)

 

Diamond Grove (Village), later Diamond Mill, (q.v.).

 

Diamond Grove was a pioneer village established near the Diamond Grove and named for it. It later became Diamond Mill. (--Place Names.)

 

Diamond Mill (Earlier Diamond Grove, q.v.).

 

Diamond Grove became an important local milling point, and its suffix was changed to Mill on account of the business interest. (--Place Names.)

Diamond is located at Section 33, Township 25 N, Range 31 W, on Highways V and Alt. 71. (--Larry A. James.)

 

Ergo

 

Ergo was two miles east of Chester, which in turn, was three and one-half miles southeast of Newtonia. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

 

Fairbanks

 

Fairbanks was in the northeast corner of the county, approximately five miles southwest of Sarcoxie, from which point mail was delivered by R. F. D. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

 

Gates

 

This store got its name from its owner. (--Place Names.) (Location is unknown.)

 

[4]

 

Gibbonville or Gibbonsville

 

It was a post-office, nine and one-half miles north, northwest of Granby City. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 401.)

Gibbonsville took its name from a Gibbons family who came to this section in the 1870's. (--Place Names.)

 

Granby

 

Granby, a town in the southern part of the county, has been a great mining center. It was probably named for one of the Granbys in four other states. (--Place Names.)

Granby, eight miles northeast of Neosho and one mile south of Granby City, its railroad station, was settled in 1856, and had a population of about 2500, (1874). It contained 1 church, 1 school and 14 stores, also a newspaper -- the Granby Miner. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 401.)

Granby, 302 miles southwest of St. Louis, is in the midst of the high, level lead region 1047 feet above sea level. In 1853, William Foster, a Cornish man, who had been working in the old Cedar Creek mines 12 miles west of Granby, moved to the place. From this time on, the growth of Granby took place at a rapid rate. (--State of Missouri, History of Newton County, 1889, Goodspeed, pp. 361-362 and following.)

Granby is located at Townships 25 & 26, Ranges 30 & 31, on Highway 60, Alt. 71, E & H.

 

Granby City

 

Granby City was a suburb of Granby, (q.v.), and was named for Granby. (--Place Names.)

 

Grangeville

 

Grangeville was located in the same place as the present town of Fairview. It is located in Section 8, Township 24 N, Range 29, in Franklin Township. (--Larry A. James.)

 

[5]

 

Gregg

 

It was in the northwest corner of the county, on the Jasper County line, approximately 3 to 4 miles east of the Kansas State line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

 

Gregg (Earlier Tanyard Hollow, q.v.)

 

Gregg, a miner, owned the store and some mining claims in this place, which was named for him. (--Place Names.)

 

Hornet

 

A store operated by a Mr. Vickery, is of recent origin. Mr. Vickery so named it to indicate that it was a live place. (--Place Names.)

It is located at Section 20, Township 26 N, Range 33 W, on Highways 43 & C.

 

Iron Switch

 

The railroad officials named a switch, five miles west of Neosho, Iron Switch. The origin of the name is not known. (--Place Names.)

 

Isbel's Mill (Later Jolly's Mill, q.v.; then Jollification, q.v.)

 

Isbel's Mill was named for a pioneer, George Isbel, who built his mill on Capp's Creek. (--Place Names.)

 

Jollification (Earlier Isbel's Mill, q.v.; then Jolly's Mill, q.v.)

 

Jollification is on the same site as Isbel's Mill and Jolly's Mill, both of which are earlier names than this one. About 1890-1900 it was named "Jollification" for Jolly's Mill and for the jolly times at the many picnics and other gatherings that were held there. (--Place Names.)

Jollification, on Capp's Creek, eighteen miles east of Neosho. John Isbell (sic), Judge Williams and John P. Osborne (who died in 1874) settled at old Jolly about 1844, while yet all the country west of Greene County was known as Barry County, with the county seat Mount Pleasant, one and one-half miles west of the present town of Pierce City, at a spot known as Wild's farm in 1873 ... on Shoal Creek a short distance from Jollification, was a saw-mill. (--State of Missouri, History of Newton County, Goodspeed, 1889, p. 391.)

It was also known as Jolly. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Williams, p. 461.)

 

[6]

 

Jolly's Mill (Earlier Isbel's Mill q.v.; finally Jollification, q.v.)

 

Jolly's Mill is on the same site as Isbel's Mill and also named for the owner, a man named Jolly. (--Place Names.)

The Jolly Mill is still standing. (--Larry A. James.)

 

June

 

June is the name of a town, established soon after the Civil War. Tradition says it was named for the month in which the first settlers moved there. (--Place Names.)

It was on R. F. D., five miles south of Neosho. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

June was earlier named Christopher, for the name of a man who owned a store there. (--Larry A. James.)

 

Kent

 

Kent, an old post-office sixteen miles southeast of Neosho, was named for the postmaster.

It was three miles northwest of Stella. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

 

Lodi

 

Lodi is an old store eight miles north of Neosho. Very likely it was named for one of the ten other Lodis in the United States, the first of which was probably named for the manufacturing city in the Milan Province where Napoleon defeated the Austrians, May 10, 1796. (--Place Names.)

 

Log

 

Log was near the Oklahoma State Line, on R. F. D., approximately six miles north of Seneca. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

 

McElhany

 

McElhany is seven miles southwest of Neosho. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

McElhany is a trading-post, which was named for a family of that name. (--Place Names.)

It is located at Sections 20, 21, Township 24 N, Range 33 W, on Highways 71 & AA.

 

[7]

 

Neosho

 

Neosho is said to be a corruption of the Osage Indian word NEOZHO, which means clear, cold water. The great springs in the middle of the city certainly bear out this story. (--Place Names.)

Neosho is beautifully situated in the valleys of Hickory and Shoal Creeks, two miles above their confluence and near the center of the county. Neosho is an Indian name and signifies "clear-cold-water". The town was first settled in 1840, incorporated in 1855, and again in 1866. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, pp. 401-402.)

Neosho is 650 feet above the level of St. Louis, 375 feet above the level of Springfield, and 1,041 feet above sea level. There are several springs in and near Neosho.

The United States Fish Commission, through the agent, Col. Moore located the first fish hatchery at Neosho, in October 1887.

A re-survey of Neosho, by F. M. Duncan, under order of Nathan Robertson, county seat commissioner, was made in January, 1846, and witnessed by James Russell, Yancey C. Richardson and W. B. Holmes, chain bearers; Levi Lee, flag bearer, and William Witherspoon, marker. The plat commenced at a stone twenty-three rods and fourteen links east of a stone standing on the west edge of Large Spring branch, nineteen links northeast of a large white oak tree.

Spring, Main and Hickory Streets are shown running East and West, and Lafayette, Washington, Wood and Jefferson Streets running North and South, with the public square between Washington, Wood, Main and Spring Streets.

McCord's addition to Neosho was surveyed by J. W. McCord May 12, 1840, on the southwest quarter of Section 19, Township 25, Range 31, directly north of the original town.

In May, 1846, William M. Chenault presented a petition from the people of Neosho, asking for incorporation. This petition was granted, and William C. Jones, Jackson C. McKay, Samuel Rice, William B. Holmes and William B. Mooney appointed trustees.

The incorporation of 1846 was a nullity so that on August 29, 1847, William B. Holmes presented a petition from two-thirds of the inhabitants, asking for incorporation. This was granted and John Murphy, William Elam, William B. Holmes, Samuel Rice and William Kendrick were appointed trustees. In February, 1851, a third petition for the incorporation of Neosho was presented to the court by Dr. Lewis Wills. This petition was granted, and Lewis Wills, Samuel Rice, John L. Chancy, J. J. Barlow, and Ambrose McKee were appointed trustees.

 

[8]

 

A petition from citizens of Neosha (sic), asking for incorporation, August 10, 1866, was granted on September 25, 1866, and Harvey Conly, George W. Randolph, H. T. Jones, John H. Price and R. V. Keller, appointed trustees.

In February, 1871, A. W. Benham presented a petition for the incorporation of Neosho City, which was granted, and Job Ratliff, A. W. Benham, Lubrick Mertin, Frederick Mertin and W. G. Ratliff were appointed trustees.

On April 22, 1880, a petition was presented to the Neosho Council, asking an election to be held on the question of admitting Neosho City or Martling Post-Office. On May 10, John McElhany presented a remonstrance against admission, which was tabled, and the original petition reported favorably, and ordered an election. On June 29, 1880, the question was settled by a majority for annexation, and on July 8, a proclamation to admit the territory was issued. In May, 1881, a motion to organize the Third Ward of Neosho was presented and ultimately carried, so that in 1881, it became a part of the City of Neosho. (--State of Missouri, History of Newton Co., pp. 324,326.)

In April, 1873, a post-office was established at Neosho City, under the name Martling, but was discontinued in October, 1880. In December, 1879, the first telephone was introduced into Neosho, connecting the Armstrong House with the depot. In New Neosho, Wittim's Neosho City House was completed in November, 1870. (--State of Missouri, History of Newton Co., p. 333.)

In response to a call by the deposed Governor Jackson, dated at Lexington, September 26, 1861, the ex-General Assembly of Missouri met in extra session at the Masonic Hall, Neosho, October 21, 1861.

After several days of preliminary work, a bill by M. C. Goodlett, of Johnson County was introduced --"An act to dissolve the political connection between the State of Missouri, with the United States of America". This was read, rule suspended, read a second time and third time and passed. After the proceedings, the House and Senate adjourned to meet at Cassville, October 31, 1861.

There were several reasons in 1861 that Neosho should be selected as the spot to launch forth the secession ordinance of October 31, 1861, chief of which was the fact that it was only about thirty miles from the Arkansas State Line. (--State of Missouri, History of Newton Co., pp. 328, 329, 330.)

Neosho is located at Township 25 N, Ranges 31 & 32, W. It is on Highways 60, 71, Alt. 71, H & HH. (It covers several sections.)

 

[9]

 

Monark Springs

 

It is east of Neosho. It is located at Section 26, Township 25 N, Range 31 W. on an unmarked road, south of Highway 86.

 

Newstead

 

It was approximately two miles west of Grangeville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

 

Newtonia

 

A village in Newton County, eleven miles east of Neosho, the county seat...It was long known as Prairie City, being located on Oliver's Prairie, named for the first white inhabitant of the county, Lunsford Oliver, who came in 1830. It was platted in 1857, when M. H. Ritchie donated thirteen lots to the Oliver Prairie Male and Female Academy, now extinct. The town was practically obliterated during the Civil War. In 1868 it was incorporated, and the same year was almost entirely destroyed, but was afterward rebuilt. (--Encyclopedia of the History of Mo., Conrad, Vol. 4, p. 477.)

During the Civil War several skirmishes occurred in and near Newtonia.

Newtonia, or the Prairie City, has been the center of pioneer association since 1830. A plat of Newtonia was recorded August 13, 1857, being Morgan's seventy acres, or the east half of the southeast quarter of Section 14, adjoining Dr. John Hind's northeast quarter section on the west and M. H. Ritchey's land on the east. Ritchey is sometimes spelled Ritchie.

Ritchey was severely damaged during the Civil War, and a great fire in 1868 came up to finish the work of war. In 1869 a determined effort was made by the people to rise above their misfortunes, and by 1884 a material improvement was noted. (--State of Missouri, History of Newton Co., pp. 316 and following; also pp. 386-387.

Newtonia is pleasantly situated on Oliver's Prairie, eleven miles east of Neosho, and four and one-half miles south of Ritchey, its railroad station. It was chartered in 1856, and laid out by Judge M. H. Ritchie in 1857. It has a flouring mill, high school, 4 stores and about 400 inhabitants, (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 402.)

 

Nobleton (Earlier Thompson's Mills, q.v.)

 

Nobleton was the name of old Thompson's Mills after 1870. No reason for the name is known. (--Place Names.)

It was located at Section 23, Township 25 N, Range 31 W., 4 miles east of Neosho, (--Larry A. James.)

 

[10]

 

Nobleton (Cont.)

 

Nobleton, in the spring of 1870, was the site of William Thompson's saw and grist-mills, store and shops. (--State of Missouri, History of Newton Co., p. 391.)

 

Old Harmony (Later Wanda, q.v.)

 

Old Harmony was a famous camp-meeting ground in pioneer days. In about 1895 the name of the town was changed to Wanda. The original name was given because of the harmony existing among the worshippers. (--Place Names.)

 

Park

 

Park was approximately six miles northeast of Granby, from where mail was delivered by R. F. D. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

 

Pepsin

 

Pepsin, a store and voting precinct, was established about 1830. No source of the name is known. (--Place Names.)

It was approximately two and one-half miles south of the Jasper County line, on the R. F. D. from Granby, approximately nine miles to the south. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

Pepsin was located at Section 29, Township 27 N, Range 30 W, on Highway E, north of Highway J, east of Diamond.

 

Prairie View

 

Prairie View is the name of a store and voting precinct. It was so named because of the beautiful view from the store. (--Place Names.) (Location is unknown.)

 

Quapaw

 

Quapaw was a post-office seventeen miles, west, northwest of Neosho, near the Indian Territory, (Oklahoma) line. (--Gazatteer of Missouri, p. 402.)

It was located at Section 14, Township 26 N, Range 34 W. (--Larry A. James.)

 

[11]

 

Racine (Dayton)

 

Racine is a station on the A. & P. R. R., (Frisco), ten miles west of Neosho. It had a saw and grist-mill, a school house, 2 stores, and a population of about 100, (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 402.)

 

Racine (Earlier Dayton, q.v.)

 

Racine, for the city of that name in Wisconsin, was submitted and accepted by the Postal Department, in 1871, when "Dayton" caused a conflict in the mail. (--Place Names.)

 

Redding's Mill or Redding or Reding's Mill, (later Shoalsburg (h). q.v.)

 

Redding's Mill was named for John Redding, who built the first mill before the Civil War. (--Place Names.)

It is located at Section 36, Township 27 N, Range 33 W, on Highway 71, near a suburb of Joplin, (Leawood).

 

Ritchey

 

The town of Ritchville was surveyed for Matthew H. Ritchey and Mary E. Ritchey in August, 1870. The plat shows nine blocks on one side of the railroad, and four blocks on the other side. Main, Elm and Oak Streets, intersected by Benton, Spring and Jefferson are named. Owing to the fact that a post-office named Ritchville had already existed it became necessary to change the name of the new town, and the name of the pioneer and owner was suggested and adopted.

J.T. Sanders was appointed postmaster in 1870, but refusing to serve, Zenos Smith was appointed. (--State of Missouri, History of Newton Co., p. 383.)

It is located at Section 26, Township 26 N, Range 30 W, on Highway W, north of 60.

 

Saginaw (Earlier Thurman, q.v.)

 

Saginaw is the name of the trading-point, Thurman, after the name was changed in 1890. It was transferred (sic) from Saginaw, Michigan. (--Place Names.)

It is approximately two and one-half miles south of the Jasper County line, on the K. C. S. Railroad. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

It is located at Section 32, Township 27 N, Range 32 W, east of 71.

 

[12]

 

Seneca

 

Seneca was named for the Seneca Indians, who lived just across the State Line in Indian Territory. (Oklahoma). (--Place Names.)

Seneca, on the A. & P. R. R., (Frisco) sixteen miles west of Neosho, is in a beautiful valley, near the Indian Territory Line. It has a machine shop, Tripoli factory and 14 stores, and does considerable trade with the Indians. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 402, (1874).)

The town of Seneca was platted on the south half of the southeast quarter of Section 35, Township 25, Range 34, October, 31, 1868, by J.C. Bunch. Mill Street, running east and west, with Bluff and Main Streets, north and south are shown. In May, 1871, the limits were extended.

It is on the Western Line of Missouri, bordering on the Indian Territory. It is located on Lost Creek. (--State of Missouri, History of Newton Co., p. 375.

It is located on Business Route 60, 43, and K.

 

Shoal Creek (Village)

 

It is south of the Jasper line; a suburb of Joplin.

It is located at Section 22, Township 27 N, Range 33 W, on Highways 86 & 43. Population, 1967, 277.

 

Shoal Creek (The stream)

 

Shoal Creek was so named because of the nature of the creek in pioneer days. (See Shoalsburgh). (--Place Names.)

 

Shoalsburg or Shoalsburgh

 

Shoalsburg, fourteen miles northwest of Neosho, is the name given to the old milling settlement of Redding, (q.v.), where J. S. Redding's saw and grist-mills were established. These industries with a public school and the post-office of which M. B. Redding was postmaster, formed the beginnings of the village.

Shoalsburgh, twelve miles northwest of Neosho, has a flouring mill, a store and a population of about 50, (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 402; State of Missouri, History of Newton Co., p. 391.)

 

Shoalsburg (Earlier Redding's Mill, q.v.)

 

Shoalsburgh was a name applied to Redding's Mill for a time because it was on Shoal Creek, (q.v.). (--Place Names.)

 

[13]

 

Spring City

 

Spring City, a mining town which sprang up in 1885, was named for the spring nearby. (--Place Names.)

Spring City, was on the R. F. D. from Joplin, (Jasper Co.), approximately ten miles north. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

It is located at Sections 9 & 10, Township 26 N, Range 33 W, on Highways 86 & C. It is still a town. (--Larry A. James.)

 

Spurgeon

 

Spurgeon, a mining town which arose about 1880, was named for the Spurgeon family who lived there. (--Place Names.)

It was approximately seven miles northwest of Neosho, from where it was served by R. F. D. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

It was located at Section 22, Township 26 N, Range 32 W, on Highway NN, south of P.

 

Staples

 

Staples, a little village near Joplin, was named for the man who operated the store. (--Place Names.) (Exact location is unknown).

 

Stark City

 

Stark City was named for William P. Stark, a famous nursery man, who established a large nursery there in 1907. (--Place Names.)

It was located at Sections 23 & 26, Township 25 N, Range 30 W, on Highways 86 & D.

 

Stella

 

Stella, founded about 1870, is a busy little town on Indian Creek. It was named for some woman in the neighborhood very likely. (--Place Names.)

Stella is approximately one mile north of the McDonald County line, in the southeast corner of the county. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

It is located at Section 32, Township 24 N, Range 30 W, on Highways D & F.

 

[14]

 

Stinsonville

 

Stinsonville was located at Section 8, Township 26 N, Range 29 W, on Highway J, west of Wentworth, or east of W.

 

Sweetwater

 

Sweetwater is the name of a little trading-post established on Sweetwater Branch just after the Civil War. It was named for the branch. (--Place Names.)

It was approximately seven miles southeast of Neosho, from which point it was served by R. F. D. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

It was located at Section 10, Township 24 N, Range 31 W, on Highways H & HH.

 

Talmage City

 

Talmage City, a trading-point established about 1890, was named for the owner of the store and farm about it. (--Place Names.)

The City of Talmage on the west half of the northwest quarter of Section 34, Township 27 N, Range 29, was platted for the Memphis, Carthage & Northwestern Railroad Co., by order of L. P. Cunningham, president, who acknowledged the plat December 14, 1872. Talmage in 1882 contained 32 persons. (--State of Missouri, History of Newton Co., p. 390.)

Although not shown as Talmage on the map, from the map co-ordinates shown above, it was on Highways 37 & AA, northwest of Wentworth.

 

Tanyard Hollow (later Gregg, q.v.)

 

Tanyard Hollow was the earlier name of Gregg and was so named because of a tannery there in early times. (--Place Names.)

 

Thompson's Mills (Later Nobleton, q.v.)

 

Thompson's Mills were grist and saw mills established by William Thompson and named for him. (--Place Names.)

 

[15]

 

Thurman (Later Saginaw, q.v.)

 

Thurman was the name of a trading-point which was established soon after the Civil War by a Mr. Thurman and named for him. (--Place Names.)

The town of Thurman was surveyed in August 1872, by P. A. Riggins, on the southeast corner of the northwest quarter of the northeast quarter of Section 31, Township 27, Range 32, for Benjamin L. Riggins and John A. J. Chapman. The plat shows Chapman and Buchanan Streets, intersecting Grove, Rock and Bluff Streets. The Corn Smelting Works at Thurman were opened in November, 1874. At this time Frank Livingston conducted the post-office store, while Lyman superintended the corn store. (--State of Missouri, History of Newton Co., p. 391.)

It is located on Highway 71, south of I-44.

 

Tiptonford

 

It was four and one-half miles south of Saginaw, on the Kansas City Southern Railroad, and approximately ten miles north of Neosho. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

It was located at Section 15, Township 26 N, Range 32 W, on an unmarked road west of Washington Carver National Park, and south of Highway V.

Tiptonford was named for James William Tipton. (--Larry A James.)

 

Tripoli

 

Tripoli was so named because of the large deposits of Magnesium limestone of the same quality of that imported from Tripoli, Africa. (--Place Names.)

(It was near Seneca, but the exact location is not known; Tripoli powder is used in rubbing-down varnish, preparatory to giving it a final finish.)

 

Virvins

 

In 1873 Nicholas Alfred, Compte de Virvins, Baron Fraunberg, a native of Brittany, purchased 45,000 acres of land from the Frisco Railroad Company and had the town of Virvins surveyed. It was named for the owner. (--Place Names.) (Exact location is unknown.)

 

Waddill

 

Waddill was three and one-half miles northeast of Stella. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

 

[16]

 

Wall

 

Wall was approximately one and one-half miles west of McElhany. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

 

Wanda (Earlier Old Harmony, q.v.)

 

Wanda was the name given to the old trading-point and camp meeting place known as Old Harmony. It is an occasional name for a girl. (--Place Names.)

Wanda was five and one-half miles south of Newtonia and three and one-half miles northeast of Kent, which in turn, was three miles northwest of Stella. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

It was located at Sections 6 & 7, Township 24 N, Range 30 W, on Highway O, south of HH.

 

Wela Park

 

Wela Park was located at Section 21, Township 25 N, Range 34 W, along Highway K, southwest of Racine.

 

Wentworth

 

Wentworth is a mining town which was started by John L. Nautly in the 1880's. Very likely it was named for the North Carolina Wentworth in Rockingham County, as many of the people in the vicinity were originally from North Carolina. (--Place Names.)

It is near the Lawrence County Line, on the Frisco Railroad, eight miles southeast of Sarcoxie, (Jasper Co.). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 461.)

It is located at Section 2, Township 26 N, Range 29 W, on Highways J & 37.

 

Westview

 

Westview was located at Section 7, Township 24 N, Range 33 W, on Highway CC, north of 60.

 

Fairview

 

Fairview is located at Section 7, Township 24 N, Range 29 W, on Highways HH & 86.

See Taney Co. Directory for complete list of Fairviews in Missouri.

 

[17]

 

Almeda

 

The town of Almeda was located at Section 13, Township 26 N, Range 29 W. (--Larry A. James.)

 

Leawood

 

Another Suburb of Joplin, south of the Jasper Co. line, at Section 26, Township 27 N, Range 32 W, on Highway 71, population, as of 1967, 152.

 

Midway

 

*A suburb of Joplin

 

Sunnyvale

 

*A suburb of Joplin

 

Cliff Village

 

*A suburb of Joplin.

 

Silver Creek

 

*A suburb of Joplin.

 

Shoal Creek Dr.

 

*A suburb of Joplin.

 

Dennis Acres

 

*A suburb of Joplin

 

*Larry A. James.

 

Note: Most of Mr. James' information was taken from Edward's Historical Atlas of Newton County, 1882.

 

 


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