A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Polk County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


Polk County

[1]

Adonis

Adonis was an early trading-point at or near the pioneer mill built by Flowers. The name is from Greek Mythology, but the reason for its selection is unknown. (--Place Names in Southwest Missouri Counties, Robert Lee Myers, 1930. A thesis for Master of Arts, in the school at Columbia Missouri, University of Missouri. On Micro-film, afterwards referred to as Place Names.)

It was in the north central part of the county, on the Pomme de Terre River, four miles west of Sentinel. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, Walter Williams, p. 483.)

It was located at Section 10, Township 35 N, Range 22 W. It was on the south side of the eastern arm of Pomme de Terre Reservoir. (--Highway Map of Polk County, as issued by The Missouri State Highway Department, 4-13-64. Unless otherwise noted, all descriptions are from this map.)

Aldrich

It is in the southwest part of the county, seven miles south of Fair Play, on the (now abandoned) Kansas City, Clinton & Springfield Railroad. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It was re-located, due to the construction of the Stockton Dam and Reservoir, in 1969-70.

It is located at Section 34, Township 33 N, Range 24 W, and is on Highways 123 & TT.

Appleby Mill

Appleby Mill was a pioneer mill built by Appleby on Little Sac River, in the southwest part of the county. It was named for the owner. (--Place Names, Etc.)

Bolivar

Bolivar is in the center of the county, ten miles east of Fair Play. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It is 90 miles south of Sedalia, and 30 miles north of Springfield. It has 3 hotels, 2 churches, a high school building, 1 bank, 18 stores, 2 cabinet, 2 wagon and 2 saddle and harness shops. It has 1 wool-carding machine, 1 cotton gin, 1 steam saw and 1 steam flouring mill and 2 newspapers. The present court house was built in 1841. (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 453.)

[2]

Bolivar (Cont)

Bolivar, county seat of Polk County, was selected by John M. McDonald, Markham Fristoe and John W. Hancock, in 1840. It was named for a town in Tennessee, the home of a portion of the Polk family. The Tennessee town was named for Simon Bolivar, who, after a struggle of fourteen years, from 1811 to 1825, freed Peru from the Spanish yoke. (--How Missouri Streams, Counties, Towns Were Named, by David W. Eaton, Fourth Article, p. 342. From a series of articles in the Missouri Historical Review.)

A large statue of Simon Bolivar is located in Neuhart Park, near the south side of Bolivar. The inscription thereon reads:

"The Government and the People of Venezuela to the noble city which renders through its name a perpetual homage to the Memory of the Liberator, Simon Bolivar."

Presented by President Romulo Callegos of Venezuela.

Dedicated by President Harry S. Truman, of the United States, Bolivar, Mo., July 5, 1948.

Bolivar is located at Sections 12-11-1-2, Township 33 N, Range 22 W, on Highways 13-83-32-D.

Brighton

Brighton is a pioneer town where once the overland stage was accustomed to stop (at the home of J. H. M. Smith) on its way to California. It was named by the earlier settlers for Brighton, Tipton County, Tenn. (--Place Names. Mr. Anderson.)

It is in the south central part of the county. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It is 12 miles southeast of Bolivar, and contains 1 store, (1874). (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 453.)

It is located at Section 33, Township 32 N, Range 22 W. It is on Highways 13 and 215, (formerly M.)

It appears on a list of Post-Offices in the U.S. Postal Guide, 1861.

[3]

Burnes or Burns

Burnes was named for Thomas J. Burnes, the father of Captain James W. Burnes of the 15th Missouri Cavalry during the Civil War. (--Place Names, Etc.)

It was six miles east of Bolivar, four miles west of Halfway. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

The post-office was discontinued Oct. 1, 1923. Thereafter, it was supplied from Bolivar. (--Missouri Manual, 1923-24, p. 893.)

It was located at Section 11, Township 33 N, Range 22 W. It was on Highways AA & 32.

Cedar Vista

It was located at Section 5, Township 32 N, Range 22 W. It was on Highway 13, south of Slagle.

Clifford

Clifford was a small trading-point. Mr. Shannon and Mr. Richey think it was probably named for a boy in the family of the store. Location unknown. (--Place Names, Etc.)

Cliquot

At the time the Frisco Railroad was extended on to Kansas City, (in 1890), Ben F. Leonard, who owned the land at this place, gave the site for the town and named it Cliquot in honor of his race horse. (--Place Names, Etc.)

It is 7 miles northwest of Bolivar. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It is located at Section 8, Township 34 N, Range 23 W, at the north end of Highway O.

Cronje

This community was located at Township 34 N, Range 22 W. The section is uncertain. It may have been Section 6, possibly on Highway PP, northwest of Huron. (--Phillips 66 Map of Missouri, as of 1904; also, Highway Map of Missouri, as issued by the Missouri State Highway Department, about 1940.)

[4]

Dewey

Dewey is a little trading-point which was named in 1898 in honor of Admiral George Dewey of the Spanish-American War. He captured Manila, P. I., in that year. (--Place Names, Etc., also, Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, p. 61.)

It was about thirteen and one-half miles northeast of Bolivar. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

There was a post-office here in 1903-04, according to Missouri Manual of those years, p. 472.

Dunnegan (Springs)

In 1885, T. H. B. Dunnegan asked George R. Nettleton, General Manager of the Kansas City, Clinton & Springfield Railroad, to name the station Dunnegan Springs, in honor of the Dunnegan family, the first settlers there. Mr. Nettleton did as requested, but some years later, "a crank in the Postal Department wanted to shorten all names and had the Springs cut off." (--Place Names, Etc.)

It is five and one-half miles north of Fair Play. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It is located at Section 5, Township 34 N, Range 24 W. It is on Highway 123.

Eudora (Earlier Sharon, q. v. ... Gulf P.O.)

Eudora is the name of a railroad station formerly known as Sharon. The change of this name was made because freight often went to a Sharon, in northern Missouri. Eudora was named for Eudora Springs, a health resort nearby. (--Place Names, Etc.)

Although Eudora is a feminine name, the person for whom it was named is unidentified. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, p. 73.)

It is eleven and one-half miles south of Fair Play, on the old Kansas City, Clinton & Springfield Railroad. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p 483.)

It is located at Section 26, Township 32 N, Range 24 W. It is on Highways 123, W & K.

[5]

Eudora Springs

Eudora Springs is a health resort, a half mile east of Eudora. It is a common feminine Christian name, but the reason for its selection is not known. (--Place Names.)

Fugateville

Fugateville, also known as Mission, (q.v.), was located in the center of the northeast quarter of Section 14, Township 34 N, Range 21 W. It was named for a man by the name of Fugate. (--Mr. Mose Voris. Also, see Mission.)

Fair Play

A Mr. Owen owned a store just south of the present site and called it Oakland, but when he asked for a post-office there was another Oakland in the State. Then John Wakefield and Millard H. Easley donated a new site just north of the store, and Mr. Wakefield said, "We'll just call it 'Fair Play.'"

Fair Play contains 2 stores, according to Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 453.

It is ten miles west of Bolivar, on Highway 32, near the Cedar County line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It is located at section 33, Township 34 N, Range 24 W. It is on Highways 32 & BB.

Flemington

Flemington was built after the extension of the Frisco Railroad (1898) from Bolivar to Kansas City, and was named for Robert L. Fleming who gave the site for the town. (--Place Names.)

It is in the northwest part of the county near the Hickory County line, fifteen miles north of Bolivar. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It is located at Section 8, Township 35 N, Range 23 W, on Highway V. Highway V runs east and west to Humansville.

Flower's Mill (First Simpson's Mill, q.v.; then Lightfoot's Mill, q.v.). (--Place Names.)

[6]

Gold (See, also, Tin Town; Klondike)

Gold is a small trading-point in the south part of the county. There has been a good deal of prospecting for gold in the vicinity, so the name probably came from the search for gold. (--Place Names, Etc.)

It was in the southeast part of the county, near the Dallas County line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

The post-office was discontinued July 31, 1917. Thereafter mail was supplied from Red Top. (--Missouri Manual, 1917-18, p. 644.)

Gold is now known as Tin Town. (--Mr. Anderson.)

Goodnight

It was named for J. H. Goodnight, who built and operated Goodnight's Mill on the Pomme de Terre River soon after the Civil War and was the postmaster and merchant there for many years. (--Place Names, Etc.)

It was in the southeast part of the county, five miles west of Gold. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

Goodson

It was established about 1870 and was named for Sam Goodson, a son of Mr. Goodson who was assessor for many years, beginning soon after the organization of the county. (--Place Names, Etc.)

It is in the northeast part of the county, about sixteen miles northeast of Bolivar. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It is located at Section 5, Township 34 N, Range 21 W, on Highway P, north of Halfway.

Graydon

Graydon is the railroad station near Graydon Springs. It took its name from the town of Graydon Springs, (q.v.) (--Place Names.)

[7]

Graydon Springs

Graydon Springs, opened as a health resort by Adams and Cummings in 1888, had been named in 1884 by Capt. Rodgers and the Frisco attorney, John O'Day, for Mr. Graydon, an officer of the Frisco Railroad. (--Place Names, Etc.)

It is located at Section 31, Township 32 N, Range 23 W.

It is in the southwest part of the county, five miles southwest of Wishart. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

Gresham

Gresham was established in the 1880's and was named for Walter Q. Gresham, who was Secretary of Treasury, 1884, under Grover Cleveland. (--Place Names, Etc.)

It was in the southern part of the county, one-half mile north of the Greene County line, three and one-half miles north of Sacville (Sackville) in Greene County. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483; Mr. Anderson.)

It was located, possibly, in Section 11, Township 31 N, Range 23 W.

Gulf Post-Office (Earlier Sharon, q. v.; then Eudora, q. v.)

Gulf was the name given to the post-office at Sharon. The Kansas City, Clinton & Springfield Railroad, was a branch of the Kansas City, Fort Scott & Gulf Railroad, so the name of the post-office was taken from the railroad. (--Place Names, Etc.)

Halfway

Halfway was named by Squire Askrem, who was its first postmaster, before the Civil War. It is halfway from Bolivar to Buffalo. (--Place Names, Etc.)

It is ten miles east of Bolivar and ten miles west of Buffalo, (Dallas County), thus halfway between the two county seats. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It is located at Sections 4 & 5, Township 33 N, Range 21 W. It is on Highways 32, H & P.

[8]

Hickory Point

"In the southwest part of Three Mound Prairie, at Hickory Point, William Jamieson opened the first retail store in the county." It was near a little grove of hickory trees which extended out to a point in one direction. (--Place Names, Etc.)

Huckaby

Huckaby is a small trading-point which has been in Polk County about thirty years, (as of 1930). It was named for a family of that name. (--Place Names, Etc.)

The post-office was discontinued July 31, 1917. Thereafter it was supplied from Goodson. (--Missouri Manual, 1917-18, p. 644.)

It was located at Section 16, Township 35 N, Range 21 W. It was located on Highways HH & CC, in the northeast corner of the county.

Humansville

Judge James G. Human of Illinois settled at the big spring in 1834 and afterwards held many positions of trust in the county. The town was named for him. (--Place Names, Etc.)

It appears on a list of post-offices in the U. S. Postal Guide, 1861.

It is in the northwest part of the county, nine miles south of Collins, (St. Clair Co.). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It is sixteen miles northwest of Bolivar, and was one of the first settled towns in the county. It contains 9 stores, and 1 cooper and 1 saddle shop, (1874). (Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874.)

It is located at Sections 9, 10, 15, 16, Township 35 N, Range 24 W, on Highways 13, 123, N, in the northwest corner of the county near the St. Clair and Cedar County lines.

Huron

Huron was an early store and post-office and was named for Huron, Henderson County, Tennessee, by settlers from that state. (--Place Names, Etc.)

It was seven and one-half miles northeast of Bolivar. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

The post-office was discontinued in 1919, thereafter being supplied from Bolivar. (--Missouri Manual, 1919-20.)

It was located at Section 4, Township 34 N, Range 22 W, on Highway PP, northeast of Bolivar.

[9]

Ingalls

Ingalls was named for a family by the name of Inglis, who came there in 1880. John Inglis, one of the members of the family is still living, (1930). Between 1885 and 1890, Mr. Dunnegan asked that the post-office be named for the Inglis family. The spelling of Ingalls is an error. (--Place Names.)

It was in the northeast corner of the county not far from the Hickory Co. line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It was located at Section 15, Township 35 N, Range 21 W, on Highways AC & HH.

Karlin (Earlier Treemont, q. v.)

Karlin (is) a small railroad town in a Bohemian settlement. It was originally called Treemont, but when the seven sons of Francka arrived, 1890-95, they changed the name to Karlin in honor of a city in the extreme northern part of Bohemia. (--Place Names.)

The post-office was changed from Treemont to Karlin, circa 1903-04. (--Missouri Manual, 1903-1904, p. 458.)

St. Wenceslaus Church in Karlin, was established in 1904, and was placed on the "in-active" list in May of 1965 because of a shortage of priests to staff all the churches and missions in "our Diocese." There are no plans to re-open the church. (--Rev. Bosco V. Westrich, vice Chancellor, of the Diocese of Springfield-Cape Girardeau.)

The post-office was discontinued circa 1944-45, since it was listed in Missouri Manual, for 1943-44, but the issue of 1945-46, omits it.

Route 7, of Bolivar serves the vicinity now. Karlin is virtually a ghost town, as there is about one family left near the town-site.

The following inscription appears on the gate of the Cemetery:

Hrbitov Sv Vaclava

Catholic Cemetery

1921

Translated the inscription reads: St. Wenceslaus Cemetery. (--Mrs. Angie Corbin, teller at Union National Bank.)

Early in April, 1921, Karlin was the site of a "test drill hole" for oil. But, sad to relate, no oil was discovered. (--Springfield Daily Leader, April 10, 1921.)

It was four miles south of Bolivar. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It was located at Section 14, Township 32 N, Range 23 W, east of Wishart, on Highway U, at the crossing of the railroad, and adjacent.

[10]

Klondike

This was a local name for Gold, circa 1907-08. (--Mrs. Cheryl Wadsworth, teller Union National Bank.)

Lamartinsville

Lamartinsville was about half way between Bolivar and Halfway. (--New Atlas of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, Map #26.) (Mr. Voris wondered it this town were not the same as Burns, akd asked Mr. Robinson, but Mr. Robinson did not answer.).

Lick Skillet later Pin Hook later Pleasant Hope

Lick Skillet was an early, fanciful name for Pleasant Hope. (--Place Names.)

Our ancestors seem to have thought it hilariously funny to suggest that nearby communities did not always have enough to eat, and hence that they were reduced to nature's method of extracting the last morsel from their cooking vessels. There are no fewer than 8 places in Missouri that once bore the mocking name of Lickskillet. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, Robert L. Ramsay, p. 89.)

Lightfoot's Mill (first Simpson's Mill, q. v.; then Flower's Mill, q.v.).

Lightfoot's Mill was named for its owner. (--Place Names.)

Mission

Many years ago a man in Pennsylvania donated land for a church and school in this location. The place was called Mission because of this gift and its purpose. (--Place Names.)

It was eighteen and one-half miles northeast of Bolivar. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It was in the center of Northeast quarter of Section 14, Township 34 N, Range 21 W, and was also known as Fugateville, (q.v.) (Mr. Mose Voris.)

[11]

Mohawk

Mohawk was named by the pioneers for Mohawk, Greene County, Tennessee. (--Place Names.)

It was about fourteen miles northeast of Bolivar. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

The post-office was discontinued, July 31, 1917. Thereafter, it was supplied from Polk. (--Missouri Manual, 1917-1918, p. 644.)

Morrisville earlier Pleasant Prairie, q. v.; then Mount Pleasant, q. v.

Morrisville was named for Morris Mitchell, who gave land for the site of a Methodist College there in 1870. (--Place Names.)

It is ten miles south of Bolivar. In 1874, it contained a population of 100 and 2 stores. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, p. 453.)

It is located at Sections 23 & 26, Township 32 N, Range 23 W, on Highway 215.

The Methodist College referred to is the result of a merger of an academy established at Ebenezer, (Greene County) in 1845, with Scarritt College of Neosho, Mo., in 1909. Following the merger, the new college was established at Morrisville, and became known as Scarritt-Morrisville College. The college has since been discontinued. (--A Directory of Towns, Villages and Hamlets Past and Present of Greene County, Mo. Moser.)

Morrisville Station

Morrisville Station was named for Morrisville, q.v. It was approximately 2 miles north of Morrisville, on the Bolivar branch of the Frisco Railroad. With the abandonment of passenger service, the station was closed, and the small hamlet virtually disappeared. (--Personal Observation.)

Mount Pleasant earlier Pleasant Prairie, q. v.; finally, Morrisville, q. v.

Mount Pleasant was the name given to Pleasant Prairie by local inhabitants, probably because they noticed that the commanding position of the town on a high hill was the very antithesis of the "Prairie" part of the name. It finally became Morrisville. (--Place Names.)

[11]

Morrisville (Cont)

"Morrisville, as we all know, was named for the founder, Morris Mitchell. There were too many Mitchells to call it Mitchellville; besides there was another town of that name in the state. Many years before it was made a real town and named Morrisville it was called Pleasant Prairie from the lovely prairie -- like an oasis in a desert -- that is still the pride of our people.

"Several years before the town was christened Morrisville, it was called Shave Tail. In 1870 the name was used universally. Dr. William Lemmon told how the town got the unique name.

"Over a hundred years ago (from 1927) a Methodist minister, the Reverend George Mitchell owned all the land where Morrisville now stands. He had for a home a log cabin of two rooms built of hewed logs. This was the dwelling of the white folks. Ten feet west of the cabin were two more large cabins, the homes of several negro slaves who did the cooking and all the work of the preacher's household.

"One night there was a large crowd of friends and relatives at the wedding of one of his daughters. There were over a hundred horses tied to the trees along the highway that is now -- 1927 -- West College Street.

"Several people who had not been invited to the wedding showed their resentment by shaving the tails of the fine bunch of horses.

"The doctor said the tail of every horse was shaved bare, excepting a small tassel. This was almost a tragedy to the owners of the horses -- they had to be used. And the hilarity occasioned by their freak appearance gave the town its name. Morrisville is still called Shave Tail at times by people who haven't the good fortune to live here." (--Letter from Hannah M. Rhyness, to the Springfield Daily News, March 16, 1927, p. 9.)

[12]

New Market (also known as Orleans)

New Market, an active trading-point laid out by William Campbell, broke up in 1852, when he went to California. Probably it was named for one of the ten New Markets or Newmarkets, in the United States. (--Place Names; Mr. Anderson.)

Nox

Nox was a little trading-point on King Branch, four miles east of Dadeville, (Dade Co.). It was named by one of the owners of the store, Lee Wheeler, who had learned a little Latin. The dense shade of the black oak grove suggested the Latin work, Nox, night, as a descriptive term. (--Place Names.)

It was eight miles north of Walnut Grove, (Greene Co.). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

Oakland (later Fair Play, q. v.)

Oakland is the name a Mr. Bowen gave to his store just south of the present site of Fair Play. No reason for the name is definitely known, but the beautiful grove of oaks makes the name evident. (--Place Names.)

Orleans (also known as New Market)

Orleans was a very old trading-point on Little Sac, south of Aldrich. It was named for New Orleans, because so much trade from this region was carried on with that market. (--Place Names.)

It was in the southwest corner of the county, in Jackson Township. (--New Atlas of Missouri, Campbell, Map #26.)

It was ten miles southwest of Bolivar. It had 1 store and a flouring and saw mill. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 453.)

It appears on a list of post-offices, in the U. S. Postal Guide, 1861.

Payne's Prairie Post-Office

Payne's Prairie Post-office was named for the prairie on which it was located, (in the northern part of the county.). It was named for a pioneer family. (--Place Names.)

[13]

Pin Hook or Pinhook, (earlier Lick Skillet; then Pin Hook; finally, Pleasant Hope, q. v.)

Pin Hook or Pinhook was an early fanciful name for Pleasant Hope. (--Place Names.)

There is an interesting legend concerning the naming of this village. According to a story handed down to Mrs. Cheryl Wadsworth, a teller at Union National Bank, an itinerant peddler used to include this territory on his route. Among the various items he had for sale, were sewing supplies, i. e. pins, hooks, etc. The women in the area used to meet him at the cross-roads to make their purchases. Soon a small settlement was established and was called "Pinhook." Later on the name was changed to Pleasant Hope.

However, Mr. Clarence Salsman said that Jeff Odom told him a lady stole a paper of pins, and thus the name was acquired. --Mr. Mose Voris; Mr. John Robinson, postmaster, Halfway. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, Campbell, refers to Pleasant Hope, on page 453; but it does not allude to Pin Hook.)

Pleasant Hope

This small village is a trading-point, seventeen miles southeast of Bolivar, about eight miles west of the Dallas County line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It contains a carding machine, two stores and some shops. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, p. 453.)

Also, it is shown on a U. S. Geological Survey Map, surveyed in 1881; edition of 1886, reprinted in 1927.

Locally, it is still referred to as Pin Hook.

Pleasant Hope, (earlier Lick Skillet, q. v.; then Pin Hook, q. v.)

Pleasant Hope is a trading-point in the southern part of the county. It got its name from the Cumberland Presbyterians, who had a little academy there and had a "pleasant hope" for its future. Earlier, however, it had been known as Lick Skillet and Pin Hook, (or Pinhook). (--Place Names.)

Pleasant Prairie (later Mount Pleasant, q. v.; then Morrisville, q. v.)

Pleasant Prairie was so named because it was a pleasant place to live. (It later bore the names of Mount Pleasant and Morrisville.) (--Place Names.)

[14]

Polk County Post-Office

Polk County Post-Office was an early village four miles northeast of Payne's Prairie (post-office) and was named for the county. (--Place Names.)

Polk

It was in the northeast part of the county, four and one-half miles west of Goodson. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

Originally called Polk Town. It, too, was named for James K. Polk, (1879). (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, Ramsay, p. 53.)

It was on the line between Sections 1 & 2, Township 34 N, Range 21 W, on Highway D, northeast of Goodson.

Polk Town

Polk Town was the name of a store and post-office established by J. M. Zumwalt in 1879 and named for the county. (--Place Names.)

Providence

It was located in the northwest corner of the southeast quarter of Section 18, Township 32 N, Range 21 W, on the Pomme de Terre River. It was also called Bob Town, for Robert Rimmer. (--Mr. Mose Voris.)

Rice's Mill (earlier Strain's Mill, q. v.)

The old site of Rice's mill is on little Sac River a short distance below Aldrich. It got its name from B. B. Rice, one of the men to whom John Strain sold it. (--Place Names.)

Rex

It was about sixteen miles east and south of Bolivar.

It was located in the middle of Section 34, Township 33 N, Range 21 W. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483; Mr. Mose Voris.)

Rimby

It was in the northeast part of the county, five and one-half miles southwest of Ingalls. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It was on a line between Sections 22 & 27, Township 35 N, Range 21 W, on Highway 64, near HH.

[15]

Rock Prairie

It was northeast of Pleasant Hope, or north of Tin Town, (q. v.).

It was located at Section 23, Township 32 N, Range 21 W, on Highway Z.

Rondo

Rondo was a small store owned by a Mr. Schooley, who named it for the postmaster, Mr. Rondo.

It was in the northern part of the county, five and one-half miles southeast of Flemington. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It was ten miles northeast of Bolivar. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 453.)

It was located at Sections 22 & 27, Township 35 N, Range 23 W, on Highway 83, south of V.

Schell

Schell is a trading-point, the origin of whose name is not known. (Location is not known). (--Place Names, Etc.)

Schofield

In about 1870, Schofield was named for a pioneer Baptist minister, a local land owner, and a Civil War veteran. (--Place Names, Etc.)

"Not long ago, two employees of the Highway Department driving a pick-up truck got lost on Polk County road EE. They carried two signs stenciled Schofield, and had instructions to place one on either side of Schofield. But they simply could not find the town." (--L. B. Porter, Lamar, Mo., in a letter to "Over The Ozarks," a column in The Springfield Daily News, 4-6-70.

It was six miles southeast of Halfway, near the Dallas County line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It was located at Section 26, Township 33 N, Range 21 W, on Highway EE.

[16]

Sentinel Prairie (earlier Vaughn's Stand, q. v.; then South Prairie, q. v.)

Sentinel Prairie is the name of a post-office and store which had been known earlier as Vaughn's Stand. It probably takes its name from the fact that, like a sentinel, it stands out over the surrounding country. (--Place Names.)

It was in the northeast part of the county, near the Hickory County line, and three miles from Pittsburg. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It is a post-office fourteen miles northeast of Bolivar, (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 453.)

It was located at Section 16, Township 35 N, Range 21 W, and approximately one mile east of Highway 64.

Shady Grove

The saw and shingle mill, built by Thomas W. Slagle in 1872, was named Shady Grove, because of the beautiful grove of shade trees in which it was located. (--Place Names.)

Sharon (later Eudora, q. v.; then P. O. Gulf, q. v.)

Sharon was the name of the railroad station just after the coming of the Kansas City, Clinton & Springfield Railroad in 1885. It was a Bible name, but it was probably named for one of the eighteen other Sharons in the United States. (--Place Names.)

Simpson's Mill (later Lightfoot Mill, q. v.; finally Flower's Mill, q. v.)

Simpson's Mill was named for its owner, who built it on the Pomme de Terre River, prior to the Civil War. (--Place Names.)

Skillet

This town was about eight miles east of Pleasant Hope, and a little over four miles west of Elkland, (Webster Co.). It was in Jackson Township. (--Topographic Map, (Springfield Sheet), issued by the U. S. Geological Survey.) (Surveyed in 1884, Edition of 1886, reprinted in 1927.)

It was about two and one-half miles north of the Greene County line.

[17]

Slagle

Slagle is a pioneer village south of Bolivar. It was named for the early Slagle family. (--Place Names.)

Slagle is six miles south of Bolivar, on Highway 13. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It is located at Section 5, Township 32 N, Range 22 W.

South Prairie (earlier Vaughn's Stand, q. v.; later Sentinel Prairie, q. v.)

South Prairie was so named because it was a prairie in the southern part of the county. (--Place Names.)

Strain's Mill (later Rice's Mill, q. v.)

Strain's Mill, which is the oldest mill in this section of Missouri, was built in the 1850's by John Strain, who, after a few years, traded it to B. B. Rice and S. D. Strain. (--Place Names.)

Sunset

Sunset was the fanciful name given to a little store and post-office about forty years ago. It was probably named for one of the other Sunsets in the United States, (1930). (--Place Names.)

It was five and one-half miles northeast of Slagle. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

Tin Town (formerly Gold)

Tin Town was so called, because at one time all buildings were covered with tin. Hence Tin Town.

It is located at Section 36, Township 32 N, Range 21 W, on Highway CC, east of Pleasant Hope, near the Dallas County line. (There is a possibility it may have been known as Skilet in the early days, since the map co-ordinates are very similar.)

[18]

Three Mound Prairie

Three Mound Prairie is in the name of a little prairie that is so named because it has on it three mounds which stand out prominently above the surrounding land. (--Place Names.)

Treemont or Tremont, later Karlin, q. v.

This town was established in the early 1890's and the Missouri Manual, for 1893-1894, lists Tremont on page 293. It was listed as such in the Manuals through 1901-1902.

Tremont is an old trading-post. The name is said to be a corruption of Three Mound Prairie, or "Three Mounds," near it. (--Place Names.)

It is shown on a map of Missouri, p. 48, in Evening in Wisconsin edition of Rand, McNally's New General Atlas of the World, 1896.

According to a letter to Mrs. Angie Corbin, a teller at the Union National Bank, from her mother, Mrs. Joe (Effie) Vodicka, the name was changed to Karlin in the early 1900's. (She was not sure of the exact year, but the Missouri Manual for 1903-1904, p. 458, shows Karlin as a post-office. Tremont is not listed.).

Mrs. Vodicka adds, "The mail was missent so much to Fremont, (in Carter County) and vice versa, that the post-master requested that a change be made. Your grandfather and the people nearby were mostly "Czech," (then Bohemians) and since there was -- and may still be -- a street in Prague named Karlin, they decided to change the name from Tremont to Karlin."

Karlin was listed in the Missouri Manuals through 1943-1944, but in the Missouri Manual of 1945-1946, the name was omitted from the list.

Mrs. Vodicka continues, "Karlin post-office was closed, as Route 7 from Bolivar was close by. I don't know who the postmaster was before the appointment of Joe Dvorak, (from Howell, Nebraska, no relative of the composer). Mr. Dvorak was appointed about 1903-1904."

[19]

Van

William S. Burns, who was a land owner at this place, named the little trading-point for his son, Van Burns. (--Place Names.)

It was six miles east and five miles southeast of Bolivar, south of Burns. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It is located at Section 25, Township 33 N, Range 21 W, and is on Highway YY, east of H.

Vaughn's Stand (later South Prairie; finally Sentinel Prairie, q. v.).

Jeremiah Vaughn built the first store at this place in 1863 and gave it his name. The name "stand" is commonly used in the southern states to refer to a little trading-point. This accounts for the suffix "Stand." (--Place Names.)

Violet

Violet is a little trading-point about forty years old, (as of 1930). Tradition says it was named for a woman in the vicinity. (--Place Names.)

It was eight and one-half miles northeast of Bolivar. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

The post-office was discontinued October 1, 1923, thereafter it was supplied from Bolivar. (--Missouri Manual, 1923-1924, p. 893.)

It was located at Sections 14, 15, 22, Township 34 N, Range 21 W, on Highway AA, north of Burns.

West Bend

West Bend was a trading-point in a west bend of little Sac River, three and one-half miles southwest of Morrisville. It was named for its location. (--Place Names; Mr. Anderson.)

It was in Looney Township. (--Topographic Map, (Springfield Sheet), issued by the U. S. Geological Survey. Surveyed in 1884, Edition of 1886, and reprinted in 1927.)

[20]

Wishart

Wishart is a village on the Frisco south of Bolivar. It was named, about 1855, for Dr. Wishart, general passenger agent for the Frisco Railroad. (--Place Names.)

It is about eleven miles southwest of Bolivar. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 483.)

It is located at Section 16, Township 32 N, Range 23 W, at the south end of Highway UU.

The following post-offices could not be located:

Erna

A post-office, listed in Missouri Manual, 1901-1902, on page 394.

Otis

A post-office, listed in Missouri Manual, 1901-1902, on page 389.

Principia

An ill-fated utopian colony. Between 1877 and 1893, Alcander Longley, who had established several utopian colonies in Missouri, attempted to establish one in Polk County, but his attempt was unsuccessful. Virtually nothing is known of this ill-fated project. (--Missouri Historical Review, October, 1971, p. 42.)


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