A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Pulaski County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


Pulaski County

[1]

Bailey

A post-office, listed on page 421 Missouri Manual, 1897-98, and in Missouri Manual, 1901-02, p. 381. Location is unknown.

But Mr. and Mrs. Ches Helton, of Plato, Mo., are of the opinion that Bailey was later called Bloodland.

Baldridge

A post-office, listed on page 421 Missouri Manual, 1897-98. The location is unknown.

Baldridge has been in two counties; as previously mentioned it was listed in Missouri Manual, 1897-98; also it is listed in the issue of 1899-1900. Later, it was a discontinued farmer's post-office. (1915-1926) and about seven miles north of Houston, (Texas County, in Lynch Township). Named by a grandson, J. M. Baldridge whose house was the first county seat. The post-office was discontinued as of 11-1-1927, thereafter being supplied from Evening Shade.** (--Missouri Manual, 1927-28, pp. 814-815.)

Mr. and Mrs. Ches Helton, say that there is a Baldridge Creek just south of Big Piney School District, one and one-half miles east of Highway TT, in the Mark Twain National Forest. They are in agreement that the post-office was named for a man by the name of Baldridge.

**Additional information is from a Thesis by Anna O'Brien, B. S. in Ed. An M. A. Thesis which Miss O'Brien submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts, in the Graduate School of the University of Missouri, 1939.

Bates

(Now Bartlett's Mill) (--State of Missouri, History of Pulaski Co., pp. 128-131.)

Big Piney

A post-office listed on page 423, Missouri Manual, 1897-98.

It was approximately 14 miles south of Waynesville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

It was located at Section 12, Township 34 N, Range 10 W. (--General Highway Map of Pulaski County, issued by the Missouri State Highway Department, 4-1-67. Unless otherwise specified, all map descriptions are quoted from this map.)

Bellefonte

A post-office 11 miles southwest of Waynesville. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, p. 457; also, The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

There was a post-office here in 1901-02, according to Missouri Manual, for those years, p. 381.

Prior to this date, Bellefonte was in Laclede County. (--Sergeant Groves, of the Highway Patrol, who has been working on a history of post-offices in Laclede County.)

[2]

Bloodland

It was ten miles south of Waynesville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

It is now in the Fort Leonard Wood Military Reservation.

It had a post-office and a high-school. (--Daughter of present postmaster at Roby, S. K. Koonce, by Mr. and Mrs. Ches Helton, Plato, Mo.)

Brownfield (now in Laclede County)

It is approximately 20 miles southwest of Waynesville, on the Laclede County line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

There was a post-office there in 1901-02, according to Missouri Manual for those years.

Buckhorn

Buckhorn is located at Section 8, Township 35 N, Range 12 W, on Highway 17, southwest of Waynesville.

Cookville

It was a post-office, listed on page 423 of Missouri Manual, 1897-98.

It was 12 miles southwest of Waynesville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

It was between Bloodland and Palace. (--Mr. and Mrs. Ches Helton.)

Cookville had a store and mill which was managed by W. J. Cook, in 1889. (--State of Missouri, History of Pulaski Co., p. 151.)

It is now in the Fort Leonard Wood Military Reservation.

Crocker

Crocker is the fourth town in Pulaski County, and is one of the first shipping-points. It is, (1899), a freight and express depot for Waynesville, Iberia, Brumley, Toronto and Hawkey. Crocker is on the railway, a little west of the middle portion of the northern region of the county, and is a town made by the railway, and grown from the ruins of a little place built in 1869, and the following year, J. A. Flippen removed from Humboldt and erected what is now (1899) the Bostick Hotel. Joseph Fielbelman's store, erected in 1871, was the "last straw" on the back of Humboldt. (--State of Missouri, History of Pulaski Co., p. 150.)

Crocker, on the A. & P. Railroad, (now Frisco), 150 miles from St. Louis, is a growing village with 2 general stores, and is the railroad station for Waynesville. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, p. 150.)

It is 10 1/2 miles north and west of Waynesville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

It is located at Section 8, Township 37 N, Range 12 W, on Highways 17, 133 and AA.

[3]

De Bruin

De bruin was six miles southwest of Waynesville. It had 1 general store. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 457. Also, The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

There was a post-office there in 1897-98. (--Missouri Manual for those years, p. 421.)

Decker (see page 11)

Decker was 7 miles southeast of Waynesville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

It is now in the Fort Leonard Wood Military Reservation.

Devil's Elbow

A resort center on the Big Piney River near the old bridge -- a lovely place today, popular for hunting and fishing. It got its unusual name during the era for lumber and tie rafting down the river to market. It was the abrupt bend in the river that caused so much trouble. Long rafts had to be cut in two in order to round the bend, hence the name "Devil's Elbow." (--Lest We Forget, A History of Pulaski County.)

There was a post-office at Devil's Elbow in 1939-40. (--Missouri Manual for those years, p. 936.)

It is located at Section 16, Township 36 N, Range 10 W, on Highways 66 & V, east of St. Robert.

Dixon

Dixon is the second town in the county within easy reach of the Matthew's Prairie Settlement ... The land was entered by Pittman & Kehr, railway land agents, and half of it was deeded to the railway company. In 1869, it was laid out by Milton Santee (a surveyor of Rolla) on both sides of the railway.

About 1872, the railway company located the division end here. This added a round-house for four engines and made it a residence for four crews; this number was increased during about three years, until there were located four freight and two or three passenger crews. For the following two years or thereabouts, the division was located at St. James, but was brought back about 1878, and remained until 1884, the time of its removal to Newburg. No other event has so affected the town as has these oscillations of the end of the divisions; this does not control the place, however, for the surrounding country and population are abundantly sufficient to warrant the growth of the town ...

[4]

Dixon (Cont)

Town incorporation cuts quite a pungent figure in the history of Dixon. The most active spirit of the incorporating element was W. H. Murphy, and their object was secured in 1878. W. R. Wilson was elected Mayor, but the opposition from the railway men especially made it necessary for the circuit court to reverse the action of the county court. Mr. Murphy and others succeeded in securing another incorporation, and J. H. Imboden was made Mayor, but by general consent this also came to naught, and it now is not an incorporation. (--The State of Missouri, History of Pulaski Co., pp. 143, 144, 145.)

Dixon, on the A. & P. R. R. (now Frisco), is 12 miles northeast of Crocker, and was settled in 1869. It had 3 stores, 1 grist-mill, 3 hotels, 1 church, and 1 public school. The population is about 300, (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, po. 457. Also, The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

It is located at Section 26, Township 37 N, Range 11 W on Highways 27, O & C, in the northeast corner of the county.

Duke

It is in the southeast part of the county, near the Phelps County line. It is 6 miles from Rolfe (Phelps Co.) (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

There has been a post-office there since 1901. The earliest post-office is listed on page 384, Missouri Manual, 1901-02.

It is southeast of Big Piney, on Section 8, Township 34 N, Range 10 W. (--Phillips Oil Co., Map, in connection with Highway Map of Pulaski County, issued by The Missouri State Highway Department.)

Dundas

It was in Robideaux (Roubideaux) Township. (--New Atlas of Missouri, Map #27.)

It was a post-office, 14 miles southwest of Waynesville. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 457.)

[5]

Fort Leonard Wood

It was upon the site of the abandoned C. C. C. Camp that a fort was started in 1940. The new fort was allocated on that part of the Mark Twain National Forest Reservation lying within the boundaries of Pulaski County.

On the Third of December in 1940, an army camp was started on the Mark Twain National Forest Reservation, within three miles of Waynesville.

January Third, 1941, the War Department issued the order that designated the area as Fort Leonard Wood, in honor of the late Major General Leonard E. Wood, Chief of Staff of the U. S. Army from 1910-1914, and hero of the Spanish-American War and famous Indian fighter. (--Lest We Forget, A History of Pulaski County and Fort Leonard Wood, pp. 55, 57.)

Francis

Francis has two stores and a mill and has recently been made a post-office. (--State of Missouri, History of Pulaski Co., p. 151.)

It was approximately 21 1/4 miles southwest of Waynesville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

There was a post-office there in 1901-02, according to Missouri Manual for those years, p. 385.

Franks

It is a station on the A. & P. R. R. (Frisco), 17 miles east of Crocker.

It is 6 miles southeast of Dixon. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

Franks has a store and mill, and John McMakin is a leader there. (1889). (--State of Missouri, History of Pulaski Co., p. 151.)

It is located at Section 4, Township 37 N, Range 10 W, in the northeast part of the county.

Fyan

It was about 2 miles southeast of Brownfield, or approximately 20 miles southwest of Waynesville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

[6]

Hancock

Hancock, a railway point between Crocker and Dixon, was entered as a land site in 1865 by Isaac Goodman. He sold it in 1868 to W. H. Murphy, who laid out the place in 1869, and Murphy Brothers opened the first store in August of that year. They moved to Dixon in 1877.

The place was first called Iron Summitt. (--State of Missouri, History of Pulaski Co., pp. 150-151.)

See Iron Summitt. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 457.)

It is approximately 5 miles west of Dixon. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

A post-office was listed for Hancock, in Missouri Manual, 1901-02, p. 386.

It is located at Section 31, Township 38 N, Range 12 W, on Highway 133.

Hanna

It is 8 miles southwest of Waynesville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

It is a post-office and store, on the Roubidoux. Mrs. H. F. (Stella) Dye is the post-mistress. (--Mrs. Ches Helton, Plato, Mo.)

It is located on the section line between Sections 27 & 28, Township 25 N, Range 12 W, at the south end of Highway NN, southeast of Laquey.

Hawkeye

Hawkeye was 10 1/2 miles northwest of Crocker, and 5 miles from Faith, (Miller Co.). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

There was a post-office there in 1901-02, according to Missouri Manual for those years, p. 386.

A. Kieth had a store at Hawkeye, in 1889. (--State of Missouri, History of Pulaski Co., p. 151.)

It was located at Section 19, Township 37 N, Range 12 W, on Highways AA & DD, in the extreme northwest corner of the county.

Hooker

It is 8 miles west of Arlington, (Phelps Co.). (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

There was a post-office there in 1901-02, according to Missouri Manual for those years, p. 386.

It is located at Section 8, Township 36 N, Range 10 W, on Highway 66, east of Devil's Elbow.

Hurabottel (or Hiltbottel)

It was in Tavern Township, near Crocker. (--New Atlas of Missouri, Map #27.)

[7]

Helms

Helms was a station on the A. & P. R. R. (Frisco), 10 miles east of Crocker. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 457.)

It was located at Section 29, Township 38 N, Range 11 W, on Highway N, east of Hancock.

Iron Summitt (Hancock)

Iron Summitt, on the A. & P. R. R. (Frisco) 6 miles northeast of Crocker, has 2 general stores, 1 hotel and 1 public school. This town is the shipping-point for the great iron bank in Miller County, (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 457.)

Laquey

This post-office town, (p. o. 1839-40) and (1901-02) Missouri Manuals, p. 936 and 387, is located on section line between Sections 13 & 17, Township 35 N, Range 12 W, on Highway 17.

Leone

Leone is a town in contemplation in the southeastern part of the county. G. P. Walker heads the enterprise. (--State of Missouri, History of Pulaski Co., p. 151.)

The Miller Spring

While not a town, still it deserves a place in this directory. On the south side of Fort Leonard Wood can be found a unique spring; different from most springs in that it rises and falls similar to the ebb and flow of the tides of the ocean. There are three or four springs in the Ozarks whose flows varies, but Miller is the only one whose flow is regular. Its ebb and flow is regular every eight hours. It rises about five inches on the level. Indians used to call it the "Breathing Spring." Engineers from the Missouri School of Mines at Rolla think that air pressure in the underground caverns builds up ever so often and forces the greater flow. (--Lest We Forget: A History of Pulaski Co., pp. 68 & 69.)

It is 2 miles northeast of Big Piney. (--Mrs. Verner Page, Big Piney, Mo.)

Moab

A post-office listed in Missouri Manual, 1897-98, p. 294.

It was 11 1/2 miles southeast of Waynesville, near the Big Piney River. It was south of Devil's Elbow. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 385.)

It is now in the Fort Leonard Wood Military Reservation.

Moab was a rural school at Blue Springs, above Devil's Elbow. (--Mrs. Ches Helton, Plato, Mo.)

[8]

Richland

Richland is the most robust child of the St. Louis & San Francisco Railway in the county, and proudly bears the title of a "city of the fourth class," the only city or incorporated town in the county, (1889). It was laid out on railway land by M. Santee, a surveyor, and located near the western boundary of the county, in the fall of 1869. The plat was made on both sides of the railway, and the officials of the railway named it in honor of General Lyon. The petition for a post-office brought to light the fact of another Missouri point bearing that name, and at the suggestions of Rev. (now) J. A. Bradshaw and Capt. L. Withaup, a name was found to honor Mr. G. W. Rich, a director of the old Atlantic and Pacific Railway. (--State of Missouri, History of Pulaski Co., pp. 137-138.)

Richland on the A. & P. R. R., 13 miles southwest of Crocker, built in 1870 has about 500 inhabitants, and is one of the most flourishing villages in the county. The Richland Institute, the best school in the county is located here, and owns a substantial two-story building furnished in modern style. The Christians, Methodists and Baptists have organizations, but as yet no buildings. There are 7 stores, 1 hotel and 1 newspaper. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, (1874), p. 457.)

Richland is on the county lines of Pulaski, Camden and Laclede Counties. That portion of Richland in Camden County has been incorporated and is known as "Hillhouse," with a population of about 300. (--Mayor of Richland, Mo.)

It is not known about the portion of Richland which extends into Laclede County.

Richland was incorporated as a village by the county court at the beginning of its existence, but in 1884, it was incorporated as a city of the fourth class. (--State of Missouri, History of Pulaski Co., p. 141.)

It is located at Sections 17 & 18, Township 36 N, Range 13 W, on Highways 7, 133 & A.

St. John

It was located at Sections 5 & 8, Township 36 N, Range 13 W. It is not shown on the Missouri State Highway Department Map of Pulaski Co., 4-1-67, but it was located with the aid of the Map of Missouri, issued by The Missouri Home Life Insurance Co.

[9]

St. Roberts

A new community, the result of the building of Fort Leonard Wood. The early pioneers who settled in the community were a religious sect known as the Dunkards. They were so religious that it became known as Gospel Ridge. ...

As the years passed the Dunkards either died out or moved away, and the people who lived there, were, for the most part Baptists. But Gospel Ridge remained a rural community until 1941, when Fort Leonard Wood was constructed. (--Lest We Forget; A History of Pulaski County, p. 22.)

It is east of Waynesville, on Sections 24 & 25, Township 36 N, Range 11 W, on I-44 and 66, west of Y.

Schlicht

It was 5 miles southwest of Crocker. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

Swedeborg

It is a Swedish settlement and railway point between Richland and Crocker, the land of which was bought from the railway about 1878, by the Swede Company. (--State of Missouri, History of Pulaski Co., p. 151.)

It is 5 1/2 miles southwest of Crocker. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

It is located at Section 26, Township 37 N, Range 13 W, on Highways 133 & T.

Tribune

A post-office listed in Missouri Manual, 1893-94, p. 297. It was 12 miles south of Waynesville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

It is now in the Fort Leonard Wood Military Reservation. It was at the south side of the Training Center at Fort Leonard Wood. It was moved. (--Mr. and Mrs. Ches Helton, Plato, Mo.)

[10]

Waynesville

Waynesville, the county seat, 10 miles south of Crocker, is near the center of the county. The land upon which it is built was given by Wm. Moore and Josiah Christenson, who laid off the town in 1834. It has a new and elegant court-house, erected in 1873, 3 stores, 1 public school, and a population of about 100. The Baptists and Methodists have organizations here, but no church buildings. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 457.)

G. W. Gibson "squatted" at the site of Waynesville before the county was organized -- the spring of about 1831 or 1832 -- when its magnificent spring was a watering place on the old "Kickapoo Trace," or the old St. Louis and Springfield road as it became known later on. Then James A. Bates opened a log-cabin store near the creek about 1835, and the county fathers fixed upon his place as a temporary court-house. William Moore moved down from Stark's Ford, and bought Gibson's claim, and E. J. Christenson built a house on the hill. Moore and Cook were merchants; also, Swink & Dodson were in business for a short time; about 1841 Edwin Swink entered the land, and some trouble was had on account of William Moore's squatter claims. (Evidently the trouble was resolved, as no further mention of it is made.)

The town first grew up around the creek banks, but about 1847, it began to dispose itself around the court-house. In 1839 the county platted the town, by its surveyor, Thomas P. Masterson, and Cyrus Colley was commissioner to sell the lots. They sold rapidly. The post-office was secured by Harvey Wood, who, in a conversation before a young boy named V. B. Hill, said he was going to have it named after old "Mad Anthony Wayne." (--State of Missouri, History of Pulaski Co., pp. 147-148.)

It is located at Sections 24 & 25, Township 36 N, Range 12 W, on Highways 17, 66 and City Route I-44.

Wharton

This small town is now in the Fort Leonard Wood Military Reservation.

It was north of Bloodland. There was a store and a post-office there; Dick Brown was postmaster. (--Mrs. Verner Page, Big Piney, Mo.)

Wheeler

Wheeler was 6 miles south of Hancock. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 485.)

It was located at Section 25, Township 37 N, Range 12 W, at the east end of Highway DD. (--Apparently it is nearly abandoned.)

[11]

Wildwood

It was near what is now the main gate of Fort Leonard Wood. It was a store and post-office, operated by a man named Thompson, It is now in the Fort Leonard Wood Military Reservation. (--Mrs. Ches Helton, Plato, Mo.)

Woodend

A station on the A. & P. R. R. (Frisco), 6 miles southwest of Crocker, (1874). (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 457.)

Rigsby

The location of this town is unknown.

Decker (See page 3)

Decker was above Moab and near Hooker. (--Mrs. Ches Helton, Plato, Mo.)


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