A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of St. Charles County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


St. Charles County

[1]

All Saints Village

All Saints Village is situated at Sec. 3 & 10, Twp. 46 N, Range 3 E on an unmarked county road between Highways 70 & N. (--General Highway Map of St. Charles County, issued 11-1-66. Unless otherwise noted, all map descriptions are from this map.)

Mail via St. Peters. (--Standard Ref. Guide of Mo., 1974, Rand, McNally. Referred to as Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Allen's Prairie

Allen's Prairie was six miles west of O'Fallon, (1874). (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, p. 488.)

It is no longer listed.

Augusta elevation 615 feet

The town of Augusta is located on the Missouri River, in Femme Osage Township. The town was originally called Mount Pleasant and was laid out in 1836 by Leonard Harold, a Pennsylvania Dutchman, who came to the locality immediately after the War of 1812 ... Up to 1872, Augusta had a very fine landing under the hills that front the Missouri, but during that year the river changed its course, filled in the main channel opposite the town, so that the old channel is now (1885) on the opposite extreme of the bottom land, on the Franklin County side ... (--Hist. of St. Charles Co., p. 236.)

It is 36 miles above St. Charles, and in 1874, it contained 3 churches, Lutheran, Catholic and Evangelical, 3 school-houses, 16 stores, 1 brewery, 1 pork-house, 5 wine cellars, 4 carpenter shops and 1 flouring-mill. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 487; Encyclopedia of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conrad, Vol. 1, p. 88.)

It is situated at Sec. 13, Twp. 44 N, Range 1 East, at the edge of the Missouri River.

Black Walnut

Black Walnut is in Femme Osage Township. (--Hist. of St. Charles Co., p. 277.)

It is 8 or 9 miles northeast of St. Charles. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, Walter Williams, p. 499.)

It is situated at Sec. undetermined, Twp. 40 N, Range 6 East on Highway H south of the junction with 94, south of Portage des Sioux.

Population 30, mail via St. Charles. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[2]

Boschertown

It is situated at Sec. undetermined, Twp. 47 N, Range 5 East on Highway 94, south of B.

Mail via St. Charles; population 35. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Cappeln

Cappeln was a post-office 12 miles southeast of Wentzville. (--Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, p. 487.)

It is situated at Sec. 5, Twp. 45 N, Range 1 East on Highway D southwest of New Melle.

Mail via Foristell. No population shown. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Centaur Springs

Centaur Springs was northeast of Matson, on the M. K. & T. Railroad. (--Map of Mo., 1939, Rand, McNally.)

Centaur Springs is no longer listed in St. Charles Co.; there is a Centaur in St. Louis Co. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Cottleville

Cottleville, five miles south of St. Peters and ten miles west of St. Charles on the Boone's Lick road, was established by Lorenzo Cottle in 1839 and had a population of about 500 (1874.) It contained 11 stores, 2 hotels, 2 carpenter shops, 2 public schools - 1 white, 1 colored, 2 churches, Evangelical and Methodist, and a Catholic Church in course of construction. (--Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, p. 481.)

It is situated at Sec. undetermined, Twp. 46 N, Range 3 East on Highway N, West of the junction with 94.

Dalhoff

Dalhoff was a post-office 6 miles southwest of O'Fallon. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 487.)

It is no longer listed.

Dardenne

See St. Peters. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 487.)

There is a Dardenne situated at Sec. 1, 2, & 11, Twp. 46 N, Range 3 East on Highway N east of 40.

Mail via O'Fallon; population 65. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[3]

Dortmund

In 1837 Julius and Conrad Mallincrodt came from Westphalia, Germany, and located about one mile west of Augusta ... Julius, shortly afterward platted and laid out the town of Dortmund which he named for his native city in Germany. The place was killed in its infancy; in fact soon after Mr. Mallincrodt had sold many of the town lots, and before building operations began, the ... waters of the Missouri swept around to the opposite side of the broad bottom lands and left the village without a river. This unfortunate circumstance nipped the embryo city in the bud, and the property again came into the possession of its original owner. The property platted as Dortmund is about one mile west of Augusta, in the low lands formed by a creek emptying into the Missouri. (--Hist. of St. Charles Co., pp. 236, 237.)

Defiance

Defiance is four miles south of Hamburg. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 499.)

It is situated in Sec. undetermined, Twp. 45 N, Range 2 East on Highway 94 south of F.

Elm Point (Elm Point Place)

Elm Point on the Norfolk & Western Railroad, is three miles northwest of St. Charles. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 488.)

Apparently it is situated at Sec. 12, Twp. 47 N, Range 5 East.

Mail via St. Charles; population 120. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Enon

Enon was situated at Sec. 5,6, Twp 47 N, Range 2 East on Highway P northwest of Josephville.

Enon is no longer listed in St. Charles Co; there is an Enon in Moniteau County. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Femme Osage

The location of Femme Osage village is quite romantic. The small collection of houses nestled among the trees in the valley of Femme Osage ... gives the place the appearance of some old Swiss village ... A short distance from the little cluster of houses is (1885) located the old stone house erected by Nathan Boone in which his renowned father Col. Daniel Boone passed his last years.

[4]

Femme Osage

A blacksmith and wagon shop, a shoe shop and one small general store, comprised all the business houses of the place, most of the trading being done at Augusta, five miles away. (--Hist. of St. Charles Co., p. 239.)

It is said that one of the early settlers found the body of an Osage squaw in the stream, giving it the name of Femme Osage meaning Osage Woman. This was also the name of the district over which Daniel Boone ruled as Commandant, under Spanish authority ... The home of his son, Nathan, was standing here in 1890; it was of stone, two stories high, the first of its kind in the district. Here Jonathan Bryan built the first water mill west of the Mississippi River, in 1801. It was of rude construction; its product was six to ten bushels a day and the meal had to be sifted because of its coarseness. At the same time a man named McSpaddin made gunpowder by hand which sold at one dollar a pound. (--Encyclopedia of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conrad, Vol. 2, pp. 422, 423.)

Femme Osage is situated at Sec. 20, Twp. 45 N, Range 1 E, on Highway TT, in the southwest corner of the county.

Mail via Augusta. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Firma

Firma was four miles northwest of Peruque. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 499.)

It is no longer listed.

Flint Hill

Flint Hill, four miles north of Wentzville, was established by Taliaferro P. Grantham in 1838, and had two schools, one store and one hotel. (--Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, p. 488.)

It is situated at Sec. 2 ?, Twp. 47 N, Range 1 East on Highway 61 north of Wentzville.

Foristell

Foristell (formerly Millville and Snow Hill) on the St. L., K. C. & N. R. W., 26 miles west of St. Charles, was laid out by J. A. Davis in 1856 and contained a school, a wagon shop and four stores. Population about 30, 1874. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 488.)

It is in the western edge of the county near Warren County line, at Sec. 19 & 30, Twp 47 N, Range 1 East at the junction of Highways H & 40.

[5]

Gilmore elevation 560 feet

Gilmore is a station on the St. L. K. C. & N. Railway, (Norfolk & Western) 19 miles west of St. Charles. (--Gazetteer of Mo, 1874, p. 488.)

It is situated at Sec. 21 & 28, Twp. 47 N, Range 2 East on Highway AA east of the junction with 40.

Mail via Wentzville. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Hamburg

Hamburg was a post-office on the Missouri River, 15 miles south of O'Fallon. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 488.)

It was in Femme Osage Township. (--Hist. of St. Charles Co., p. 257.)

It was near the southwest corner of Dardenne Township. (--New Atlas of Mo., 1874, Campbell, Map #21.)

It is no longer listed.

Harvester

Harvester is situated at Sec. 16, Twp. 46 N, Range 4 East, east of Cottleville.

It is a rural branch of St. Charles Post Office. Population 40. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Hoeberville

Hoeberville was four miles north of Gilmore. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 499.)

It is no longer listed.

Horse-Shoe Lake

Horse-Shoe Lake was in the northwest corner of the county, six and one-half miles northwest of Peruque, on the C. B. & Q. (now a part of the Burlington-Northern R. R. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 499.)

No town is listed for Horse-Shoe Lake. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Howell

Howell was a post-office four miles north of Hamburg. (--The State of Mo, in 1904, p. 499, Gen. Scheme, 1905, p. 94.)

It is no longer listed.

Howell's Prairie

Howell's Prairie was north of Mechanicsville. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #21.)

No longer listed.

[6]

Jacobs

Jacobs was situated at Sec. 29 or 30, Twp. 46 N, Range 4 East on the M. K. & T. R. R.

It is no longer listed.

Josephville

Josephville is four miles north of Wentzville. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 499.)

It had a post-office in 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 94.)

It is situated at Sec. 9 & 16, Twp. 47 N, Range 2 East on an unmarked county road south of P, east of Flint Hill.

Mail via Wentzville; population 40. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Kampville

Kampville is on the C. B. & Q. R. R., west of Orchard Farm. (--Map of Mo., 1939, Rand, McNally.)

It is situated at Secs. 2 & 11, Twp. 47 N, Range 4 East on Highway B east of C.

Mail via St. Charles; population 200. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Kickapoo Indian Village

Kickapoo Indian Village stood about two and a half miles southwest of Portage des Sioux. (--Hist. of St. Charles Co., p. 262.)

Klondike

Klondike is three miles east of Augusta, on the M. K. & T. R. R. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 499.)

It has no population. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Lassouris

Lassouris, named for the Indian chief was below Portage des Sioux on the Mississippi. (--The Hist. of St. Charles Co., p. 262.)

It is no longer listed.

Lynchburg

Lynchburg was on the Cuivre River, opposite Chain of Rocks (Lincoln Co.) (--New Atlas of Mo., 1874, Campbell, Map #21.)

Lynchburg is no longer listed in St. Charles Co. There is a Lynchburg in Laclede County. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[7]

Machens

Machens was four miles northeast of Black Walnut. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 499.)

The post-office was discontinued in December, 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 94.)

It was situated at Sec. undetermined, Twp. 46 N, Range 6 East on Highway 94 east of the junction with J & H.

It is no longer listed.

Maple Lake

Maple Lake was on the Keokuk, St. Louis and N. W. R. R., north of Peruque. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.)

It is no longer listed.

Matson

Matson is between Defiance and Klondike on the M. K. & T. R. R. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 499.)

It is situated at Sec. undetermined, Twp. 46 N, Range 2 East on Highway 94.

Millville

See Foristell. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 488.)

There is a Millville in Ray County. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Miller Station or Harvester P.O.

It is situated on the M. K. & T. R. R., between St. Charles and Hamburg. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.)

See Harvester.

Missouriton or Missouritown

G. H. Wallace was postmaster in 1837. (--Wetmore's Gazetteer of Mo., p. 276.)

It was in Femme Osage Township, on Darst's bottoms. (--Hist. of St. Charles Co., p. 235.)

In 1834, Rodman Kenner, of Virginia, came to Missouri and settled near Missouriton where he lived one year -- (See Pauldingville.) (--Hist. of St. Charles Co., p. 235.)

It was in the southeast corner of the county near the Missouri River. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #21.)

It was a post-office on the Missouri River, 20 miles southwest of St. Charles. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 488.) It is no longer listed.

[8]

Mount Pleasant

See Augusta. (--Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, p. 488.)

There is a Mount Pleasant in Miller Co. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

New Melle elevation 789 feet

New Melle was laid out by Franz Henry Kemper in 1858, and is 26 miles west southwest of St. Charles. It was settled by emigrants from Melle, Germany, and had 11 stores, 2 churches -- Lutheran and Methodist, 3 school houses -- public, Lutheran and Methodist, 3 wagon, 2 carpenter and 2 cooper shops, 1 hotel, 1 flouring and saw-mill combined, and 1 pork house ... New Melle annually shipped over 100,000 dozen eggs, (1874.) (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 488.)

New Melle is in the southwest corner of the county, at Sec. 26, Twp. 46 N, Range 1 East at the junction of Highways Z & D.

Naylor's Store Dalhoff Post-Office.

It is shown in New Atlas of Mo., 1874, Map #21.

It is no longer listed.

There is a Naylor in Ripley County. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Nona

Nona was west of Klondike, on the M. K. & T. R. R. (--Map of Mo., 1939, Rand, McNally.)

It was situated in the southwest corner of the county at Sec. 17 & 20, Twp. 44 N, Range 1 East.

It is no longer listed.

O'Fallon

O'Fallon, on the St. L. K. C. & N. R. W. (Norfolk & Western) 13 miles west of St. Charles, was laid out by John C. Edwards, W. C. Williams, Appleton Bradley and Fred. Matthews, and an addition was made to it by Arnold Krekel. It contained 2 stores, 2 hotels, 1 broom factory, 1 church -- Catholic; one and one-quarter miles south was a Methodist Church, 5 miles west, at Allen's Prairie, was a Catholic Church, and about 2 1/2 miles south was Fairview Seminary. Population about 1,150 (1874). (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 488.)

It covers several sections in Twp. 47 N, Range 3 East on Highway 70 west of 79.

[9]

Orchard Farms Orchard Farm

It is three and one-half miles west of Machens. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 499.)

It is situated at Sec. 34, Twp. 48 N, Range 5 East on Highway 94 north of H.

Pauldingville

Pauldingville was in Callaway Township. (--Hist. of St. Charles Co., p. 235.)

About 1835, Rodman Kenner, of Virginia ... moved out on the Boone's Lick road and opened a first-class hotel. (See Missouriton.) (--Hist. of St. Charles Co., p. 235.)

Apparently it was on the section line between Sec. 6 & 7, of Callaway Township. (--New Atlas of Mo., 1874, Campbell, Map #21.)

It is no longer listed.

Peruque

Peruque, on the St. L. K. C. & N. R. W. (Norfolk & Western) is sixteen miles west of St. Charles. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 488.)

It is situated at Sec. 36, Twp. 48 N, Range 3 East and Sec. 6, Twp. 48 N, Range 4 East on Highway C at the edge of the Mississippi River.

It is a rural branch of St. Charles post-office. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Portage Des Sioux elevation 435 feet

In the latter part of the summer of 1799, Francis Lesieur, then a resident of St. Charles, in a hunting excursion to the lakes in the prairie bottoms, visited an Indian village a short distance from the Mississippi, and in company with some of the Indians, came as far as the river, where there was another Indian settlement. The neighborhood pleased him so much as a site for a village that on his return to St. Charles a colony was organized to settle the locality. Lieutenant Governor Delassus, then at St. Louis, made a grant of land the same fall, and a number of families principally from St. Louis and St. Charles erected their tents on the site of Portage des Sioux. Francis Saucier was appointed Commandant, a position which he continued to hold until the change of government ...

The name of Portage de Sioux had been given to the place by the Indians, and was adopted by the French settlers. Here the distance between the Missouri and Mississippi is scarcely two miles. Bands of Indians on their journeys were accustomed to disembark, carry their canoes across the narrow neck from one river to the other and thus save the long journey of twenty-five miles around the point of land which runs from one river to the other. (--Hist. of St. Charles Co., pp. 261, 262, 263.)

[10]

Portage Des Sioux (Cont)

It was established about 20 years after the settlement of St. Louis ... It had 1 Catholic Church, 1 school, 7 churches, 4 grain dealers ... 2 commission merchants, 4 warehouses, 1 lumber-yard, 2 broom factories and 1 hotel. (--Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, p. 488.)

Francis Saucier was appointed Commandant of the post, and served as such until the transfer of the Territory to the United States. His daughter, Bridget, who married Stephen de Lisle, was the first white child born there, in 1800. During the War of 1812 a fort was built there, and in 1815, it was the scene of the treaty of peace made by Governor Clark and the Confederated Indian tribes under Tecumseh ... On the "Point" nearby ... Samuel Griffith from New York, one of the very first Americans in Missouri, settled in 1795. Soon after came Ebenezer D. Ayers, also from the East, who built the first horse-power mill in that region, was one of the first justices of the peace appointed under the United States authority, in 1804, and at whose house was preached the first Protestant sermon heard in that region ... (--Encyclopedia of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conrad, Vol. 5, p. 195.)

Apparently it is situated at Sec. 5 & 6, Twp. 48 N, Range 6 East on Highway J, at the edge of the Mississippi River.

Richfield

Richfield was the first station south of Lincoln County on St. Louis, Keokuk & N. W. R. R. (C. B. & Q. R. R., part of the Burlington-Northern Railroad.) (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.)

It is no longer listed.

St. Charles elevation 455 feet

It is situated on high ground on the north bank of the Missouri River, twenty miles from its confluence with the Mississippi River, and twenty-three miles from St. Louis ... Here was made the first white settlement after that of St. Louis, and five years later, in 1769, by Louis Blanchette, surnamed Chasseur, a French hunter who named the location Les Petittes Cotes, or village des Cotes, meaning the Little Hills. When the Louisiana Territory was ceded to Spain, he was made post commandant, and he changed the name to St. Charles, in honor of Don Carlos, the Spanish monarch ... The colony which located here was strictly French. Each villager was granted a house lot 120 X 150 feet, and a tract for cultivation 1 arpent wide and 40 arpents long, containing 34 acres. In addition, 14,000 arpents were granted as "Commons," to provide fuel and pasturage ...

[11]

St. Charles (Cont)

The General Assembly, by act passed at its first session, in St. Louis in 1820, constituted St. Charles as the capital city, and that body convened there in June, 1821, in special session, and adopted a solemn public act giving assent to the conditions of the admission of Missouri as a State, in accordance with the Clay resolution, whereupon President Madison issued his proclamation announcing such admission as complete. November 5th, the General Assembly again convened in what is officially known as the second session of the First General Assembly ... at this session Governor McNair announced the admission of Missouri as a State, as proclaimed by President Monroe. The General Assembly closed its last session in St. Charles on January 21, 1826. (--Encyclopedia of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conrad, Vol. 5, pp. 419, 420.)

It covers several sections at Twp. 46 & 47, Ranges 4 & 5 East at the junction of Highways A, 70 & 94.

St. Paul

St. Paul is four and one-half miles south of Horse Shoe Lake. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 499.)

There was a post-office there in 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 95.)

It is situated at Sec. 1, Twp. 47 N, Range 2 East south of Highway Y, west of 79.

It is a rural branch of O'Fallon post-office. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

St. Peters (Dardenne) elevation 445 feet

It is on the St. L. K. C. & N. R. W. (Norfolk & Western) 8 miles west of St. Charles. It contained 1 church, 1 public and 1 private school, 2 mills, 1 cooper shop, 1 gun smith and 2 wagon shops, 1 hotel and about a dozen stores. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 490.)

It is near Dardenne Creek, the name of which is said to be a corruption of Terre d'Inde, meaning the land of turkeys, a game then plentiful ... (--Encyclopedia of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conrad, Vol. 5, p. 472.)

It covers several sections at Twp. 47 N, Range 4 East at the junction of Highway C & 70.

[12]

Schluersburg

It is in Femme Osage Township. (--New Atlas of Mo., 1874, Map #21.)

It is four miles north of Augusta. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 499.)

There was a post-office there in 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 94.)

It is situated at Sec. 25, Twp. 45 N, Range 1 East on an unmarked county road south of F, west of the junction with DD.

Mail via Augusta; population 50. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Schmucker's Store

It was a post-office 20 miles southwest of St. Charles. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 490.)

It is no longer listed.

Seeburger

Apparently Seeburger is located at Sec. 6, Twp. 47 N, Range 5 East.

It has no population. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Snow Hill

See Foristell. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 490.)

Weldon

Weldon, on the M. K. & T. R. R., has no population. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Weldon Springs

It is three and one-half miles northeast of Hamburg. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 499.)

It is situated at Sec. undetermined, Twp. 46 N, Range 3 East at the junction of Highways 94 & 61.

Mail via St. Charles. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Wellsburgh

It was a post-office four miles northwest of O'Fallon. (--Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, p. 490.)

The post-office was discontinued prior to 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 94.)

[13]

Wentzville

Wentzville, on the St. L. K. C. & N. R. W. (Norfolk & Western) 21 miles west of St. Charles, was laid out by Wm. M. Allen in 1855. Various property holders afterwards laid out additions to the town. It had 2 schools, one an academy under the superintendence of Prof. Luckett, and the other a district school; 1 Methodist church, 1 tobacco factory, 7 stores, 2 hotels, 1 carpenter shop and 1 flouring-mill. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 490.)

Cuivre River, from which the township takes its name is said to mean Copper River. The metal is unknown in that region, and the proper name is more reasonably Cuvre, meaning a fish pond ... (--Encyclopedia of the Hist. of Mo., Vol. 6, p. 442, 1901, Conrad.)

Wentzville is situated at Sec. 24, Range 1 East & Sec. 19, Range 2 East, Twp. 47 N, at the junction of Highways Z & 70.

Westalton r. r. name for West Alton elevation 445 feet

West Alton is five and one-half miles southeast of Machens. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 499.)

It is situated at Sec. undetermined, Twp. 48 N, Range 7 East on Highway 94, north and west of 67.

White Corn

White Corn was east of Wilkie, on the C. B. & Q. R. R. (--Map of Mo., 1939, Rand, McNally.)

It is no longer listed.

Willowwood Lake, Inc.

Apparently it is situated at Sec. 3, Twp. 47 N, Range 5 East south of Orchard Farm.

It is not listed in Rand, McNally, 1974.

Wilkie

Wilkie was east of Orchard Farm on the St. L. K. C. & N. W. R. R. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.)

It is no longer listed.

Mechanicsville

Mechanicsville was situated at the south edge of Howell's Prairie, in Dardenne Township. (--New Atlas of Missouri, 1874, Campbell, Map #21.)


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