A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


Ste. Genevieve County

[1]

Avon

Avon, twenty miles south southwest of Ste. Genevieve, was the only place where lead was being mined in 1874. Furnaces were being installed and there was every indication that the mining would be successful. (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Mo., 1874, p. 506.)

It is situated at Sec. 11, Twp. 36 N, Range 7 East on Highway MM south of the junction with F. (--General Highway Map of Ste. Genevieve Co., issued by The Missouri State Highway Dept., 8-1-65. Unless otherwise noted all map descriptions are from this map.)

The post-office was discontinued as of Nov. 1, 1929; thereafter mail via Farmington. (--Mo. Manual, 1929-30, p. 939.)

Big Fields ("Les Grande Champ").

Big Fields were about 2,500 acres of land on the Mississippi River Bottoms, three miles southeast of Ste. Genevieve. This was the site of what was known as "Le vieux village de Ste. Genevieve," and before the river made inroads into it contained 5,000 acres ... The residents of Ste. Genevieve from the earliest settlement down to the present (1900) time have held this land as "commons," each head of a family being allotted a portion for cultivation. (--Encyclopedia of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conrad, Vol. 1, p. 271.)

Bloomsdale

Bloomsdale, on Establishment Creek, ten miles north of Ste. Genevieve, contained one wagon shop, one store and one Church -- Catholic. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 506.)

It is situated at Secs. 11, 12, 13, & 14, Twp. 38 N, Range 7 East at the junction of E & 61, north of the junction of 61 & U.

Bowling

Bowling was situated in Saline Twp., northwest of Avon. (--New Atlas of Mo., 1874, Campbell, Map #29.)

It is no longer listed.

Brickey's

Brickey's is in the northeastern corner of the county, south of Jefferson County line. (--Map of Mo., 1917, Rand McNally.)

It is situated at Sec. 13, Twp. 29 N, Range 7 East on an unmarked county road at the edge of the Mississippi River.

Mail via Bloomsdale. (--Rand McNally Standard Reference Guide of Mo., 1974.)

[2]

Camp Rowdy

See St. Mary's (--Hist. of Southeast Mo., 1888, Goodspeed, p. 410.)

Chestnut Ridge

Chestnut Ridge was a post-office twenty miles southwest of Ste. Genevieve. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 506.)

It is no longer listed in Ste. Genevieve County. There is a Chestnut Ridge in Christian Co. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Clardy

Clardy was located in Jackson Township, northwest of Kinsey. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.)

It is no longer listed.

Clement

Clement was located in the eastern section of the county, in Jackson Township, first station south of Brickey's (--Map of Mo., 1939, Rand, McNally.)

It is no longer listed.

Clearwater

Clearwater is situated at Sec. 3, Twp. 35, Range 8 East on Highway W, east of Coffman.

It has its own post-office; population 15. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Cliff

Cliff was located in the northeast corner of the Mississippi River. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.)

Cliff is no longer listed in Ste. Genevieve County. There is a Cliff Village in Newton County. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Coffman

Coffman is located in the southern section of the county, four and one-half miles west of Ulam. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 505.)

Is is situated at Sec. 31, Twp. 36 N, Range 8 East at the junction of Highways B, F & W.

Mail via Ste. Genevieve. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[3]

Eads

Eads was northeast of Clearwater. (--Map of Mo., 1939, Rand, McNally.)

The post-office was discontinued July 31, 1917; thereafter mail via Minnith. (--Mo. Manual, 1917-18, p. 644.)

It is no longer listed.

Goodfellow

Goodfellow was located on the St. Francois County line, southwest of Mill. (--Sectional Map of Mo., 1894, Rand, McNally.)

Goodfellow is no longer listed in Ste. Genevieve County. There is a Goodfellow Terrace in St. Louis Co. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Grant's Hill

Grant's Hill was a post-office twenty miles southwest of Ste. Genevieve. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 506.)

Grant's Hill is no longer listed in Ste. Genevieve County. There is a Grant in both St. Louis and also in Worth Counties. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Hicksy

Hicksy was located at the junction of 61 & J, north of St. Mary's, at Sec. undetermined, Twp. 37 N, Range 10 East.

It is no longer listed.

Jonca

Jonca was north of Pickel and eight and one-half miles east of Farmington. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 505.)

It is no longer listed.

Kinsey

Kinsey is in the northwestern section of the county, four miles east of Rolf. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 505.)

It is situated at Sec. 2, Twp. 38 N, Range 6 East on Highway K, west of 61.

Mail via Bloomsdale. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[4]

Lawrenceton

Lawrenceton is situated in the western section of the county, six miles east of French Village (St. Francois County.) (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 505.)

It is located at Sec. 31, Twp. 38 N, Range 7 East on Highway E, east of St. Francois Co. line.

Little Rock

Little Rock was north of Ste. Genevieve on the Mississippi River. (--New Atlas of Mo., Map #29.)

It is no longer listed.

McDaniels

McDaniels was in the southwest corner of the county, near St. Francois Co. line (--Map of Mo., 1917, Rand, McNally.)

It is no longer listed.

Minnith

Minnith is in the southeast corner of the county, ten miles southwest of St. Marys.

It is situated at Sec. 28, Twp. 36 N, Range 9 East on Highway N southwest of St. Marys.

Mail via St. Marys. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Marlo

Marlo was located at Sec. 35, Twp. 38 N, Range 6 East on the Missouri-Illinois R. R., east of Highway B.

It is no longer listed.

Mill

Mill was three and three-quarters miles north of Sprott. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 505.)

Mill is no longer listed in Ste. Genevieve County. There is a Mill Spring in Wayne County; Mill Grove in Mercer County. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Millers

Millers was situated at Sec. 4, Twp. 36 N, Range 7 East on Highway 32 southwest of Weingarten.

Millers is no longer listed in Ste. Genevieve County. There is a Miller in Lawrence County. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[5]

Mosher

Mosher is situated at Sec. 31, Twp. 36 N, Range 9 East on an unmarked county road, and the Missouri Pacific Railroad, east of Highways A & 32.

It has no population. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Nations Mill

Nations Mill was located on the south edge of the county. (--Map of Mo., 1939, Rand, McNally.)

The post-office was discontinued as of Nov. 1, 1931. Thereafter mail via Wommack. (--Mo. Manual, 1931-32, p. 730.)

It is no longer listed.

New Bremen

New Bremen was in Beauvais Township, near Ste. Genevieve Township line, east of River Aux Vases. (--New Atlas of Mo., 1874, Campbell, Map #29.)

It is no longer listed.

New Bourbon

The post of New Bourbon was situated two or three miles south of Ste. Genevieve, on the bluffs overlooking the Mississippi River, ... but it ceased to exist many years ago (as of 1888). (--Hist. of Southeast Mo., 1888, Goodspeed, p. 246.)

The settlement here was made in 1793 by order of Baron Carondelet ... At New Bourbon there was a small mill erected in 1793, on the creek now called Dodge's Creek. The mill was built by Francois Valle and afterwards sold to Samuel Dodge. It was the first mill west of the Mississippi River. (--Hist. of Southeast Mo., 1912, Douglas, Vol. 1, p. 62.)

New Offenburgh

New Offenburgh, eight miles west, southwest of Ste. Genevieve, was settled by a colony from Baden ... It had two stores and one Catholic Church. (1874). (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 506.)

The population in 1974 wa 100. (--Rand, McNally.)

New Tennessee

In 1820, Elder Wingate Jackson established a Baptist Church in New Tennessee. It was named Hephzibah. (--Hist. of Southeast Mo., 1888, Goodspeed, p. 552.)

[6]

New Tennessee (Cont)

A settlement was made in the first part of the 19th Century in what is now (1901) Saline Township. It was comprised of American settlers, nearly all of whom were of the Protestant faith ... One of the prominent residents of the settlement was Thomas Madden, notable as a man of wealth. He was one of the early judges of the court of Ste. Genevieve and deputy surveyor under Soulard. He owned one of the first mills in the district, on River Aux Vases. John Coffman, a native of Virginia, was also one of the most prominent of the pioneers who lived at New Tennessee. (--Encyclopedia of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conrad, Vol. 4, p. 575.)

This settlement was made about the year 1800. (--Hist. of Southeast Mo., 1912, Douglas, Vol. 1, p. 62.)

Old Andre

Old Andre was in the Big Field, the site of the village of Ste. Genevieve. It was under water, twelve to fifteen feet deep. (--Hist. of Southeast Mo., 1888, Goodspeed, pp. 240, 241.)

It is no longer listed.

Ozora

Ozora is in the southeast corner of the county, north of St. Marys. (--Map of Mo., 1911, Rand, McNally.)

It is situated at Sec. undetermined, Twp. 37 N, Range 9 East north of the junction of J & N.

The post-office was discontinued July 31, 1917. Thereafter mail via St. Marys. (--Mo. Manual, 1917-18, p. 644.)

Pickle

Pickle was southwest of Jonca, in the southwest section of the county. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, pp. 503, 505.)

It is no longer listed.

Ponca

Ponca was west of Weingarten. (--Map of Mo., 1917, Rand, McNally.)

The post-office was discontinued July 31, 1917. Thereafter mail via Weingarten. (--Mo. Manual, 1917-18, p. 644.)

It is no longer listed.

[7]

Punjaub

Punjaub was twelve miles west of Ste. Genevieve and had one store and one good steam flouring mill, (1874). (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 506.)

It is no longer listed.

Quarrytown

Quarrytown was on the Mississippi River, five miles below Ste. Genevieve. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 506.)

River Aux Vases

River Aux Vases was a post-office ten miles south, southwest of Ste. Genevieve. (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 506.)

It is situated at Sec. 34, Twp. 37 R. Range 8 East on Highway B south of 32.

Mail via Ste. Genevieve. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Rolf

Rolf was located in the northwest section of the county, five miles south of Danby (Jefferson Co.) (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 505.)

Ste. Genevieve

The history of Ste. Genevieve as an incorporated town begins with 1808, when the court of quarter sessions defined its boundaries, which included New Bourbon, and passed an order of incorporation. The first board of trustees consisted of James Moore, John B. Valle, Aaron Elliott, John B. Pratte and J. B. St. Gem ... Ordinances were passed regulating the Big Field, prohibiting the sale of liquors to Indians, and prescribing the duties of citizens in regard to fires. Every citizen was required to provide himself with a leathern bucket, a ladder and a large vessel to hold water ...

The commerce consisted chiefly of lead and peltries, either of which passed current as money ... There was a large profit of trade with the Indians and some of the merchants became quite wealthy. It is related by Gen. Rozier that on one occasion, Thomas Maddin, one of the richest American settlers, laid a wager with Louis Bolduc, an old merchant, that he could show more wealth than Bolduc, but he quickly acknowledged that he had lost when Bolduc requested him to bring a half bushel to measure the silver money he had in his cellar. (--Hist. of Southeast Mo., Goodspeed, p. 400.)

[8]

Ste. Genevieve (Cont)

The earliest known land grants in the area were made by the Commandant at Kaskaskia in 1752. In about 1759 a parish was organized and called "Poste de Sainte Joachim." It is not known exactly when the town acquired its present name in honor of the French saint.

Ste. Genevieve became a Spanish outpost in 1762 when France transferred its territories west of the Mississippi to Spain. In 1772, with a population of 691 the settlement was larger than St. Louis. It became part of the French territory again in 1800 and was transferred to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. In 1812, when the district was organized under the territorial laws of Missouri, Ste. Genevieve was continued as the seat of district government. (--The Empire That Missouri Pacific Serves, p. 243.)

Ste. Genevieve is the oldest town in Missouri, it being settled about 1755. In 1810 it contained about twenty large stores, "from which the people of St. Louis laid in their stocks." It then required four months to go to Philadelphia and return, bringing goods via Pittsburgh, Pa., and the Ohio River. (--New Atlas of Mo., 1874, Campbell, p. 69.)

Ste. Genevieve covers several sections in Twp. 38 N, Range 9 East, at the edge of the Mississippi River, at the junction of Highways 61 & 32.

St. Judes Acres

St. Judes Acres are south of Ste. Genevieve on Highway 61 at Sec. undetermined, Twp. 38 N, Range 9 East south of the junction with 32.

Mail via Ste. Genevieve. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

St. Marys elevation 395 feet

St. Marys was a town of about 500 inhabitants, situated on the Mississippi River a short distance below the mouth of Saline Creek. It was originally known as "Camp Rowdy." ... Later it became the shipping point for Perryville and Mine La Motte, and a store was opened by Kent & Sparrow. They had come from some of the Eastern States and the village then became known as "Yankeetown." Kent & Sparrow were succeeded by Miles A. Gilbert, and at about the same time a second store was opened by Richard Bledsoe. The town then received its present name. (--Hist. of Southeast Mo., Goodspeed, p. 410.)

St. Marys is in the extreme southeastern corner of the county a small part of the town being in Perry County. It contained six stores, two hotels, two churches, one of which is Catholic, one public school, one large stream flouring mill and one stave factory. Population about 450 (1874). (--Gazetteer of Mo., p. 506.)

It is situated at Sec. undetermined, Twp. 37 N, Range 10 East on Highway 61 north of Perry County line.

[9]

Sand Mines

Sand Mines were located at the western edge of Ste. Genevieve Twp., north of New Offenbach. (--New Atlas of Mo., 1874, Map #29.)

Sprott

Sprott is in the southwest section of the county 3 1/2 miles to St. Francois County line or 13 1/2 miles from Esther, (St. Francois Co.) (--The State of Mo., in 1904, pp. 503, 505.)

It is situated at Sec. 35, Twp. 37 N, Range 6 East on Highway EE.

Mail via Weingarten. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Thurman

Thurman was in the western section of the county near St. Francois County line, 2 miles south of Jay Dee -- St. Francois Co. It was situated at Sec. 8, Twp. 37 N, Range 6 East on Highway C east of St. Francois Co. line.

It is no longer listed.

Thomure

Thomure is north of Ste. Genevieve, at Sec. undetermined, Twp. 38 N, Range 7 East. A railroad ferry is near. It is on the Missouri Illinois Railroad. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Trapek

Trapek was in the southern part of the county, first station east of Coffman. (--Map of Mo., 1911, Rand, McNally.)

It is no longer listed.

Ulam

Ulam was in the southeast corner of the county near Perry County line seven miles west of Minnith. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 505.)

It no longer listed.

Valley View

Valley View is in the northwest corner of the county, and is situated at Sec. 32, Twp. 39 N, Range 7 East on Highway K west of 61.

Mail via Bloomsdale. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[10]

Weingarten

Weingarten was platted in 1837 by Jacob Wolf and others, and was named for a town in Germany. (--Eaton, p. 61.)

It is situated at Sec. 25, Twp. 37 N, Range 7 East on Highway 32 south of O.

Mail via Ste. Genevieve. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Womack

Womack is on the southern edge of the county near St. Francois County line, and is situated at Sec. 31, Twp. 34 N, Range 8 East on Highway T.

Population 100. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Yankeetown

See St. Mary's. (--Hist. of Southeast Mo., Goodspeed, p. 410.)

Zell

Zell was in the eastern section of the county, seven miles south of Bloomsdale. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, p. 505.)

It was situated at Sec. 34, Twp. 36 N, Range 8 East on Highway A south of 61.

It is no longer listed.

Zell Station

Zell Station was situated at Sec. 3, Twp. 37 N, Range 8 East on Highway 32, south of Zell.

It is no longer listed.


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