A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of St. Louis County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


St. Louis County

[1]

Affton elevation 600 feet

Affton is a branch of the St. Louis post-office. (--Zip Code Directory, Post Office Department.)

Afton is the census name. Railroad name is Gravois Station; population, 1974, 25,000. (--Standard Ref. Guide of Mo., 1974, Rand, McNally.)

Allenton

Allenton is a village thirty-two miles west of St. Louis, on the Missouri Pacific and St. Louis & San Francisco (now B-N) Railroads, which was laid out by Thomas R. Allen, in 1852. (--Ency. of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conard, Vol. I, 32.)

It contained two stores, one public school, and one colored school. (--Campbell's Gazetteer of Mo., 1894, 512.)

Arsenal Island

Arsenal Island was formed by the transporting power of the current during early half of the last century. In 1841 the head of the island was 300 yards below the line of Arsenal Street. It then extended down the river three-fourths of a mile and was nearly half a mile wide. The island was covered with willows ... In 1862, ... the head of the island was opposite the north line of the Arsenal. By 1865 the head of the island had moved down 300 feet, in which year the main channel was on the east side. In 1874 the head of the island had moved down 1,300 feet from its position in 1865. In 1880 ... the island had moved down 4,800 feet, nearly a mile from the survey in 1862. The area of the island covered over 247 acres. In 1864, while the island was in a state of transition, it was patented to the St. Louis School Board by the Commissioner of the General Land Office at Washington ... In 1866 the city of St. Louis purchased the island from the school board for the sum of $33,000. During the Civil War the upper part of the island was used as a burial ground by the government. After the city got possession it was used for quarantine purposes and called Quarantine Island. The old graves were subsequently was washed away and scattered from here to the Gulf. In 1867-8, City Engineer Moulton constructed a dyke at the foot of Bryant Street, the effect of which was to divert the channel from the west to the east side of the island, and also washed the head of the island down some 3,000 feet. Property owners on the Illinois side ... raised a howl of opposition, caused by the diverted currents and the prospective dismemberment of the island. The Governor of Illinois was appealed to ... Eventually suits were instituted, which reached the Supreme Court of the United States, that court decreeing that the island to Illinois. Thus the government which granted the island to St. Louis, by its highest court, reclaimed the land and granted it to Illinois ... (--Ency. of the Hist. of Mo., 1901, Conard, Vol. I, 65.)

[2]

Ashland

Ashland, a town site laid out at the mouth of Fox Creek, on the north bank of the Meramec River, by an adventurous real estate operator, who came from Pittsburgh to St. Louis at an early date. Lots were sold to speculatively inclined persons who were beguiled by an alluring prospectus, but no headway was made toward the building up of a town and in process of time the property was sold for taxes, although the place continued to have a place on the map, 1899. (--Conard, Vol. I, 67, 68.)

Ashland is no longer listed in St. Louis Co.; there is an Ashland in Boone Co. (--Rand McNally, 1974.)

Baden

Baden, six miles north of St. Louis ... contained eleven stores, three wagon shops, four churches, and four schools. Population about 400, 1874. (--Campbell, 512.)

It is a station of the St. Louis Post Office. (--Zip Code Directory.)

Ballwin

Ballwin is a post-office nineteen and one-half miles west of St. Louis, on the Manchester Rock Road, and contained two stores, two large blacksmith and wagon shops, one German Methodist Church and one public school. Population (1874) about 200. (--Campbell, 512.)

It is an independent city. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Beckville

Beckville was a post-office five miles west of St. Louis and contained two stores, two churches, one of which was German Lutheran, one public school, coal mines, and a large fire brick manufactory. Population (1874) about 480. (--Campbell, 512.)

Bellefontaine

This place, fifteen miles from St. Louis, on the right bank of the Missouri River, was chosen by Gen. Wilkinson for the location of an army cantonment. Since Jefferson Barracks below St. Louis, have been finished, the property had been sold by the government agent, and a company of gentlemen in St. Louis were the purchasers. They had laid off a town here, and a number of lots were sold. Many of the purchasers were Missourians. The road from the thriving little towns of Alton, Graffton, etc. in Illinois to the city of St. Louis was shortened by this route, when the ferry was established at Bellefontaine. (--Wetmore's Gazetteer of the State of Mo., 1837, p. 176.)

[3]

Bellefontaine (Cont)

Bellefontaine, a post-office twenty-two miles west of St. Louis, on the Olive Street Rock Road, contained four stores, one carpenter, one wagon and blacksmith shop, and a limestone quarry. Population (1874) about 100. (--Campbell, 512.)

The population is included with Chesterfield; there is a Bellefontaine in Washington County. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Bellefontaine Neighbors

Mail is via St. Louis; population 13,987. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Benton

Benton, on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, six and one-half miles from St. Louis, contained a good school ... one store and several fine residences. (--Campbell, 512.)

It is now Benton Park, a station of the St. Louis post-office. (--Zip Code Directory.)

Black Jack Blackjack

Blackjack, a post-office three miles northeast of Ferguson, had one store and one wagon shop. Population (1874) about 75. (--Campbell, 512.)

Attempts to incorporate were under legislation in 1971. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Bonfils Station

Bonfils Station, on the St. L. K. C. & N. Railway, eighteen and one-quarter miles from St. Louis, contained one public school, one store and one colored school. (--Campbell, 512.)

It is a part of Bridgeton. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Bonhomme

Bonhomme was a post-office twenty-nine miles from St. Louis, and contained one store. (--Campbell, 512.)

It has no population. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Brentwood

Brentwood is a branch of St. Louis post-office. (--Ibid. Zip Code Directory.)

[4]

Breckenridge Hills

Mail is via St. Louis. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Bremen

It is a part of St. Louis. (--Ibid.)

Bridgeton

Bridgeton, on the St. L. K. C. & N. Railway, fourteen and three-quarter miles from St. Louis, was incorporated February 27, 1843. It contained two hotels, two stores, one wagon and carriage shop, one brick yard, two (brick) churches -- Catholic and M. E. Church South ... and one (brick) school house. (--Campbell, 512.)

A village near the Missouri River, only about three or four miles from St. Ferdinand, was laid out by permission of the lieutenant-governor Trudeau, by Robert Owens, who had been a resident of the country since 1781, and where, in 1793, Francois Honore and others had first formed a station to protect themselves against the Indians. Maturin Bouvet, as deputy surveyor, surveyed and platted the place in 1794. The village became known as "Marais des Liards," and also as "Village a Robert." The Wabash Railroad now passes here and the station is called Bridgeton. (--Hist. of Mo., 1908, Hauck, Vol. II, 17.)

Bridgeton, a town ... situated fifteen miles northwest from the courthouse in St. Louis, had its origin in a French and Spanish settlement, made within a few years after St. Louis was founded. The place was incorporated as a town by act of the Missouri Legislature in 1843. An old time-fort erected there for defense against the Indians was commanded for a time by William Owens, and the place was known as Owens' Station prior to its incorporation. (--Conard, Vol. I, 371, 372.)

It is a branch of Halewood post-office. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Brotherton

It was opposite the city of St. Charles. It contained one store, one hotel, one good school, one starch factory. (--Campbell, 512, 513.)

It is no longer listed.

[5]

Carondelet

Several years after Laclede established his trading-post, Clement Dolor de Treget, born at Quersy Cahors, in the south of France, established himself on the Mississippi near the mouth of the River des Peres, about ten miles below Laclede's village, probably on the site of the original Jesuit missionary settlement ... When he first arrived in Louisiana, he settled at Ste. Genevieve, but in 1767 from that place came up the river with his wife. Charmed with the beauty of the country ... he resolved to settle there, and here St. Ange made a grant of land to him. At the foot of what is now (1908) known as Elwood Street, he built a small stone house ... The stone house stood for a hundred years, but finally gave way to improvements made by the Iron Mountain Railroad in that vicinity. A village soon sprang up near his place of residence, known at first as "DeLor's village," but afterward as "Catalan's Prairie," so named for one Louis Catalan, also an early settler. Then the village was named "Louisbourg," and finally, shortly before the acquisition of Louisiana, was called "Carondelet," in honor of Baron de Carondelet, governor-general of Louisiana. Generally, however, the village was known as "Vide Poche" (Empty Pocket) a nick-name bestowed upon it by the inhabitants of St. Louis. It was also known as "Pain de Sucre." The village grew slowly, and for a number of years not more than twenty families lived there, principally engaged in agriculture, cultivating an adjacent common field, "a farming people," Choteau testified. The village had a common of 6,000 arpens, in fact more "commons" than they were able to pay Choteau for surveying ... (--Houck, Vol. II, 63, 64.)

The first settlement at Carondelet was made in 1767, when Clement de Treget Delor, a native of France, who came from a good family, and had served as an officer in the French army, built a stone house at the foot of the rock bluff about five and a half miles south of the site of the St. Louis courthouse.

Gradually other settlers gathered around him, and in 1804, the village, which then came into existence, had a population of 250 souls. Its inhabitants were much more inclined to agriculture than the inhabitants of the neighboring village of St. Louis -- who were mostly traders -- and at that time their occupation was by no means remunerative. The fact that they were less prosperous than their neighbors gave rise to the appellation, "Vide Poche," -- "Empty Pockets," -- by which the place was frequently called by the early settlers of St. Louis. It was first named Prairie a Catalan, after one Louis Catalan. Later the name was changed to Louisbourg, and in 1794, to Carondelet, the latter name being given it in honor of Baron de Carondelet, at that time Governor of Louisiana.

[6]

Carondelet (Cont)

The village of Carondelet was incorporated by the county court of St. Louis County in 1832, and the first plat of the town was made by Laurentius Eiler soon afterward. It was incorporated as a city by legislative enactment, March 1, 1881, and divided into three wards. James B. Walsh was first mayor of the city. It was annexed to and became a part of St. Louis in 1870. (--Conard, Vol. I, 443.)

It is a station of St. Louis post-office. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

"Catalan's Prairie"

See Carondelet.

Central

Central, a post-office eight and one-half miles west of St. Louis ... contained two stores, one blacksmith and wagon shop, one (brick) Catholic Church, and one (brick) public school. Population (1874) about 100. (--Campbell, 513.)

It is a station of St. Louis post-office. (--Zip Code Directory.)

Cheltenham

A suburban district of St. Louis, chiefly noted for its manufacturing of fire clay. It was the site of the Icarian settlement founded in 1857 and broken up in 1864. Its name originated with William Wibble, who built there a country home and named it "Cheltenham," after the famous watering place in Gloucestershire, England. when the Missouri Pacific Railroad Company established a station near Mr. Wibble's place, the station was named Cheltenham, and this name attached itself to the adjacent territory.

It is a part of St. Louis. (--Zip Code Directory.)

Chesterfield

It is on the Rock Island Railroad, north of Bellefontaie. (--Williams, p. 507.)

It was laid out in 1818. (--How Mo. Towns, Streams and Counties Were Named, Eaton, 62.)

It is an independent post-office. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[7]

Cheltenham (Cont)

It is on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, five and one-half miles from St. Louis, and contained three stores, one silver and refining furnace, four large manufactories of fire brick, tile and drainpipe, one Catholic Church, two wagon shops, and one (brick) public school. Population (1874) about 300. (--Campbell, 513.)

Clayton elevation 550 feet

Clayton is the county seat of St. Louis County. It was laid out in 1878 around a tract of four acres, donated by Mrs. Hanley, for the public buildings, and was named after Ralph Clayton, an old citizen, who donated one hundred acres of his farm to the new county. Mr. Clayton was born in Augusta County, Virginia, February 22, 1788, came to Missouri in 1820 and settled in Central Township, of St. Louis County, on the land which he opened and lived on, till his death at the age of ninety-six years. (--Conard, Vol. II, 22.)

It is a branch of St. Louis post-office. (--Zip Code Directory.)

Cliff Cave also known as Indian Cave

Cliff Cave, on the Mississippi River, and on the ST. L. I. M & S. R. W., thirteen miles from St. Louis, was the location of Indian Cave, and was frequented by pleasure parties from St. Louis. (--Campbell, 513; see, also, Conard, Vol. II, 27.)

Coleman

Coleman was a post-office, five and one-half miles west of St. Louis, on the Olive Street Rock Road ... contained one store, and two fine nurseries. (--Campbell, 513.)

Coleman is no longer listed in St. Louis Co.; there is a Coleman in Cass County. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

College View

College View, on the ST. L. K. C. & N. R. W., nine miles from St. Louis, received its name from being the contemplated site of a large Catholic college. (--Campbell, 513.) It is no longer listed.

[8]

Creve Coeur

Another settlement existed in the Bon Homme region near and on Creve Coeur Creek. Conway says the name originated from this circumstance: That in 1796 after a big flood of the Missouri, there was much sickness in the bottoms and among the first French settlers there, that a large number died, and that the survivors abandoned the locality, and hence the name "Creve Coeur," brokenhearted ... (--Houck, Vol. II, 72; see, also, Campbell, 513.)

Delor's Village

See Carondelet.

Crestwood

Crestwood is a part of St. Louis. (--Rand McNally, 1974.)

Dellwood

Delwood is three miles west of Bellefontaine Neighbors. Mail is via St. Louis. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Des Peres

Des Peres was a post-office on the Manchester Rock Road, and contained one store. (--Campbell, 513.)

It is a branch of St. Louis post-office. (--Zip Code Directory.)

Ellendale

Ellendale was a suburban town, on the Missouri Pacific Railroad ... just outside the limits of St. Louis (1899). It took its name from the eldest daughter of William L. Thomas, publisher of the "School and Home" of St. Louis, who laid off a subdivision of thirty-three acres in the vicinity, and who with his wife, deeded the ground on which the beautiful station house stood to the railroad company. (--Conard, Vol. II, 369.) It is no longer listed.

Ellisville

Ellisville is a post-office, twenty-two miles from St. Louis on the Manchester Rock Road, and contained one store, and in its vicinity one good brick church, Lutheran. (--Campbell, 513.)

It is a branch of Ballwin post-office. (Rand McNally, 1974.)

[9]

Eureka

In most instances where communities have chosen for their name Archimede's historic exclamation, the choice was inspired by some discovery made at or in the vicinity of the community site. This cross roads trading center in St. Louis County is no exception. Its name is said to have been provided by a construction engineer for the pioneer Pacific Railroad, who found that a route through the valley in which the town now lies would eliminate many cuts and grades. A construction camp established here in 1853 was jocularly called "Eureka" and when the town was laid out in 1858 it adopted the name with the approval of the Post Office Department. (--The Empire That Missouri Pacific Serves, a publication of the Missouri Pacific Railroad Company; 209.)

A place of 250 inhabitants (1901), thirty miles west of St. Louis, on the Missouri Pacific and St. Louis & San Francisco (now Burlington-Northern) Railroads, laid out in 1859 ... It had a Methodist (South) Church, and Episcopal Chapel and a Masonic Hall. It was for a time the home of Edward Johnson, a brilliant newspaper writer whose Washington City letters to a Philadelphia paper, over the signature of "Il Segretaire," about 1848, attracted much attention. The vicinity of Eureka was the scene of a railroad collision, attended by the loss of several lives and the wounding of many other persons in 1869. (--Conard, Col. II, 388; see, also, Campbell, 513.)

It is an independent post-office. (--Rand McNally, 1974.)

Fairview

Fairview, on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, nine miles of St. Louis, had in its vicinity one large fine (stone) Episcopal Church, value about $12,000. (--Campbell, 513.)

It is a part of Jennings. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Fee Fee (Patton's Store)

It was a business point two miles southwest of Bridgeton, and contained one store, one wagon shop and two (brick churches) -- Baptist, the oldest organization of this denomination in St. Louis County, and Presbyterian O. S.; valuation of the former about $7,000 and of the latter about $4,000 (1874.) (--Campbell, 513.)

Pattonville is a part of Bridgeton. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[10]

Fee Fee (Cont)

The Baptist Church, located on Fee Fee Creek ... was said to have been organized as early as 1807 by Elder Thomas R. Music ... No minutes of this church exist prior to 1820, but no doubt occasional meetings were held by the Baptister ... No mention is made by Peck of Fee Fee as an early Baptist preaching station ... (--Houck, Vol., III, 216.)

Nicolas Beaugeneau (Beaugeneaux) farmer, forty-five years of age, at Fort de Chartres in 1758 ...was a native of Canada; died in St. Louis, in 1770; ... His oldest son also named Nicolas, called "Fifi," born in Canada in 1741 ... The name of FeeFee Creek in St. Louis County derived its name from his nickname "Fifi," (Billons annals of St. Louis, Vol. I, p. 466) which is pronounced in French like Feefee ... (--Houck, Vol., II, 9.)

Fenton

A beautiful little town on the Meramec River, and also on the Gravois Rock Road, fourteen miles from St. Louis. It was laid out about the beginning of the nineteenth century by Wm. Long, who named it for his maternal family. There was an iron bridge across the Meramec River at the place. Nearly all the travel and traffic between St. Louis and Jefferson County passed through this place. (--Conard, Vol. II, 423.)

Fenton, on the Meramec River, four and one-half miles south of Kirkwood, contained three stores, one M. E. Church, South and one school. (--Campbell, 513.)

It is an independent post-office. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Ferguson elevation 505 feet

An incorporated city ... on the Wabash Railroad, six miles from St. Louis, takes its name from William B. Ferguson ... a large land owner, who in 1838, gave the ground for a station on the old North Missouri Railroad, afterward incorporated in the Wabash System ...

It is situated in one of the most beautiful districts in St. Louis County, and contained the country homes of many prominent businessmen of the city. It had five churches. Population, 1899 (estimated) 2,000. (--Conard, Vol. II, 423.)

[11]

Ferguson (Cont)

It contained two stores, one wagon shop, one Presbyterian Church, one (brick) public school, value about $4,000, and a number of handsome country residences. (--Campbell, 513.)

It is a branch of St. Louis post-office. (--Zip Code Directory.)

Florence Village

A village then adjacent to St. Louis, laid out by James S. Watson and Samuel D. Smith, April 20, 1853. It is now (1901) a part of the city, on the west side of Garrison Avenue, between Thomas Street and Cass Avenue. (--Conard, Vol. II, 476.) It is no longer listed.

There is a Florence in Morgan County; a Florence in Buchanan County, (part of St. Joseph.) (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Florissant

The first settlement at Florissant -- or as it was called in early records, "Fleurissant" -- was made soon after the first settlement at St. Louis. A Jesuit mission was established there by Father Mourin, and in 1793 a special lieutenant, with the military rank of captain, was appointed by Baron de Carondelet, Governor of Louisiana, to act as military commandant at the place. In 1829 Florissant was incorporated as a town, but the charter was after a time, allowed to lapse. It was again incorporated in 1848 as a city, under the name "City of St. Ferdinand." St. Ferdinand was the name given to the place by the Spanish colonel, who drew the original plan of the village, and while "Florissant" is the name by which it is commonly known, the corporate name of the city perpetuates the intent of the founder, as to its name. An Indian School was established there under the auspices of Bishop Duboury, of the Catholic Church, in 1824, and the school thus established by the Jesuit Fathers, who came there from Maryland, was parent of the present St. Louis University. The novitiate of St. Stanislaus and other Catholic institutions have given Florissant more than local renown, and it is noted also as the burial place of many of the fathers of the Catholic Church in Missouri. (--Conard, Vol. II, 476.)

[12]

Florissant (Cont)

When the United States took possession of Louisiana, the St. Louis district embraced all the territory between the Meramec and the Missouri, and extended indefinitely west. The largest settlement in this district was St. Ferdinand, or San Fernando de Florissant. The village then contained sixty houses. The date when the first settlement was made here is not now (1908) known. It is, however, supposed that about the time Laclede established his post, some of the French immigrants from the east established themselves near ... In 1787 Francisco Rui established "Fort El Principe de Asturia" near the Missouri, eight miles or so from where the village of St. Ferdinand is now (1908) located, and it may be that the history of the first settlement of this village is connected with the erection of the fort. The ancient village of St. Ferdinand was located on rising ground on one side of Cold Water Creek -- opposite a fertile prairie two miles wide and twelve miles long, running parallel with, and about two or three miles from the Missouri River. This region was known as Florissant or "Fleurissant" long before it received the name of St. Ferdinand cause here we can well imagine the wild flowers then bloomed, luxuriantly on the open prairie ... Fountain a Biche, or Cold Water, however, was called Fernando River (Rio Fernando) by the Spaniards.

The earliest resident in the neighborhood of St. Ferdinand was Nicholas Hebert dit Lecompte, who lived there in 1765 ... Hezediah Liard settled in this neighborhood in 1797, and erected a grist and saw mill, which was in operation in 1799 ... (--Houck, Vol. II, 67, 68, 69.)

Florissant, formerly called St. Ferdinand, is an old French settlement, three miles north of Ferguson. In 1799 it contained about 300 inhabitants ... About 5,000 arpents were granted this town by the Spanish government, as a "common-field," and in 1894, at the time of its incorporation, the town authorities leased the commons to several of the citizens for 999 years, at the nominal rent of about 25 cents per acre. Only a small portion of the commons has been sold in fee simple. The village, in 1874, contained one (brick) Catholic Convent, two (brick) Catholic Churches, one Catholic parochial school; aggregate value of Catholic property, about $80,000, one public school, value about $2,000, three wagon shops, and seven stores. Population about 1,200. (--Campbell, 514.)

It is a minor zoned city. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

"Fort el Principe de Asturia"

See Florissant.

[13]

Fox Creek

Fox Creek was a post-office twenty-eight miles west of St. Louis, and contained one store. (--Campbell, 514.)

It is situated on Sec. 9, Twp. 44 N, R. 3 E. (--General Highway Map of St. Louis Co., Issued by the Missouri Highway Department, 4-1-66. Unless otherwise noted all map locations are from this map.)

The post-office was discontinued in 1905. (--General Scheme of Mo., 1905, Taft.)

Mail is via Pacific, (rural) no population. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Glencoe

A station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad ... twenty-six miles from St. Louis, taking its name from the glen in Scotland where the massacre of the MacDonalds by the Campbells took place in 1689 ... The place was wild and attractive, with the Meramec winding through the hills. (--Conard, Vol. III, 62.)

It contained one store, one large Catholic Reformatory (in process of construction), one colored Baptist Church, and in the vicinity, one M. E. Church South. (--Campbell, 514.)

It is an independent post-office. (--Rand McNally, 1974.)

Glendale elevation 600 feet

A station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad ... twelve miles form St. Louis ... Near the station were some stately villas -- one built by Col. Sam McGoffin and afterward owned for many years by Hudson E. Bridge, and after him by George Myers; another, built by Col. George E. Leighton, and afterward owned and occupied by Charles W. Barstow; another, the Dyer place, owned and occupied by Charles A. Dyer; and another, the Crittenden place, owned and occupied by Col. Sam Williams. (--Conard, Vol. III, 62; Campbell, 514.)

Grants

Grants was named in honor of President U. S. Grant, who owned the farm on which located. Mrs. Grant was born at this place. (--Eaton, 62; Campbell, 514.)

It is a part of Grantwood. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Grantwood Grant Wood

Mail is via St. Louis; population 994. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[14]

Gravois (Station)

It is the railroad name for Baden. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Hartwood

See Oakland (--Conard, Vol. V, 1.)

Indian Cave

See Cliff Cave. (--Conard, Vol. II, 21.)

Jefferson Barracks elevation 985 feet

Jefferson Barracks was one of the noted land marks on the Mississippi River and was established as a military point by the War Department in 1826. It was at first designated as the "New School for Instruction," for the training for soldiers. The tract embraced 1,700 acres, and was, until 1824, a portion of the commons belonging to the village of Carondelet, now a part of St. Louis. It was leased by the old village to the United States, with a view of getting a market nearby. A quit claim deed to the tract was given to the United States by the corporation of Carondelet in 1854, when a patent was granted for the balance of the original commons. Afterward, an unsuccessful effort was made by Carondelet to recover the land ...

From Jefferson Barracks, at different times during the subsequent history of the post, numerous expeditions had started out for distant military service, or for exploring purposes. It is stated that prior to 1861 scarcely a regiment in the army had not, at one time or another, been represented there ...

The barracks continued to be an important military post, until the breaking out of the Civil War, when they were transformed into a military hospital. Previous to that time the barracks were used as a cavalry depot, from whence recruits were sent for service in the far West. Before and up to the time of the Civil War, the following distinguished officers were stationed at Jefferson Barracks, most of them at a time when they were unknown to fame and holding a subservient rank: Gen. Henry Atkinson, commander of the right wing of the Western Department and hero of the Black Hawk War; Gen. U. S. Grant, President of the U. S.; Gen. Jefferson Davis, President of the Southern Confederacy; Gen. Stephen Watts Kearney, in command of the California expedition in the Mexican War; Gen. David T. Twiggs; Gen. Philip St. George Cook; Gen. David Hunter; Gen. Richard B. Mason, Military Governor of the California Department during the Mexican War; Gen. Edwin V. Summer; Gen. Winston Bragg, "of a little more grape" and Confederate fame;

[15]

Jefferson Barracks (Cont)

Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, Democratic nominee for President; Gen. Joseph E. Johnson next to Gen. Lee as a Confederate commander; Gen. Mansfield Lovell; Gen. Robert E. Lee, the Confederate chieftain; Gen. William J. Hardee, of "Hardee's Tactics;" Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith; Gen. Earl Van Dorn, in command of the Confederates at Pea Ridge, March, 1862; Gen. George H. Thomas; Gen. George Stoneman, chief of cavalry under Gen. Hooker and Governor of California in 1883; Gen. John B. Hood; Gen. Fitzhugh Lee; Col. Francis Lee; and Gen D. M. Frost. Among the illustrious visitors at the barracks were Gen. Brown, hero of Lundy's Lane; Daniel Webster, who crossed the river and killed a deer; and Gen. Grant, while President of the U. S. ... (--Conard, Vol. III, 424, 425, 426.)

Although the War Department abandoned it as a military installation following the end of World War II, the Jefferson Barracks still include a National Military Cemetery and government operated Veterans Hospital. (--The Empire That Missouri Pacific Serves, 223. See, also, Campbell, 514.)

It is a Veterans Administration Hospital. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Jennings

Jennings, on the St. L. K. C. & N. R. W. (now N. & W.) seven and one-half miles from St. Louis ... contained one fine (brick) public school, value $7,000, and a female seminary under Baptist patronage, (value $15,000) ... The Baptists and Presbyterians had organizations, but no edifices. Population (1874) about 100. (--Campbell, 514.)

It is a branch of St. Louis post-office and includes a branch of River Road. (--Rand McNally, 1974.)

Kirkwood elevation 635 feet

A suburban town, thirteen miles from St. Louis, on the Missouri Pacific Railroad. Two electric roads ran through it to Meramec Highlands, two and a half miles west of it, and the St. Louis & San Francisco (B N) road runs a mile south of the town, which takes its name from the first chief engineer of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, had a population of 2,825 in 1900. It had eight churches, two public schools, Haight's Military Academy, a large Armory Hall, and commodious stone station house ... (--Conard, Vol. III, 546.)

[16]

Kirkwood (Cont)

Kirkwood, thirteen and one-half miles from St. Louis, was laid out in 1852, and named in honor of the first chief engineer of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, Jas. P. Kirkwood, and incorporated February 27th, 1869 ... It is on the summit between the Meramec and Missouri Rivers, about 250 feet above St. Louis, and contained many fine residences six or seven stores, seven churches, two wagon shops, one fine hotel, two public schools, one town hall (in process of construction) and one female seminary, founded in 1860 by Miss Alma Sneed ... This was the largest town in the county outside of St. Louis, and its population, of about 2,000 was composed mainly of St. Louis business men who resided there with their families. (--Campbell, 514, 515.)

It is a branch of St. Louis post-office. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Lake

Lake was a post-office eighteen and one-half miles west of St. Louis, on the Olive Street Rock Road, and contained one store, one large wagon and blacksmith shop, and a very fine limestone quarry. (--Campbell, 515.)

The post-office was discontinued in 1905. (--Taft, 98.)

Lake is no longer listed in St. Louis County; there is a Lake Junction, part of Webster Groves. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Lake House

Lake House was a business point sixteen miles north of St. Louis, on the Olive Street Rock Road and contained one store, one hotel and one steam flouring mill. (--Campbell, 515.)

Louisbourg

See Carondelet.

Lowell

Lowell was a post-office four miles north of the courthouse in St. Louis, and contained four or five stores, four wagon shops, one public school, one church, one woolen and one soap factory and a branch of the St. Louis University. Population (1874) about 800. (--Campbell, 515.)

[17]

Manchester

Manchester, a post-office eighteen miles west of St. Louis on the old State Rock Road, contained three stores, one fine steam flouring mill, three churches, one public school, one brick yard, one wagon and one cooper shop. Population (1874) about 300. (--Campbell, 515.)

It is an old town on the Manchester Rock Road ... The first settler is said to have been an Indian having the civilized name of Bryson O'Hara, whose cabin stood near the spring. It was first called Hoardstown, from Jesse Hoard, from Kentucky, who followed O'Hara and built a house there, and this name was maintained until about 1825, when an English settler, who had located there gave it the name of Manchester. (--Conard, Vol. IV, 168.)

It is a branch of Ballwin post-office. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Maplewood elevation 508 feet

Maplewood was named for the Maplewood Realty Company. It occupies part of a Spanish grant made in 1785 to Charles Gratiot. The area was once called Sutton in honor of James C. Sutton, an ironsmith, who purchased part of Gratiot's land in 1825. One of Maplewood's principal streets still bears the Sutton name.

In 1890 the Maplewood Realty Company purchased several hundred acres of land from the Sutton heirs and started the subdivision of Maplewood. The town was incorporated in 1908. (--The Empire That Missouri Pacific Serves, 231.)

A station on the electric railroad between St. Louis and the Meramec Highlands. There was a post-office at the station, and a Congregational Church, and a number of attractive residences in the neighborhood. (--Conard, Vol. IV, 184.)

It is a branch of St. Louis Post Office. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Marais des Liard

One of the names by which the settlement at what is now Bridgeton was known to the early French settlers. (--Conard, Vol. IV, 184.)

Melrose

Melrose was a post-office thirty-one miles west of St. Louis. (--Campbell, 515.)

The post-office was discontinued in 1905. (--Taft, 98.)

Mail is via Glencoe (rural); no population. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[18]

Midland

Midland was east of Clayton. (--The State of Mo., in 1904, Williams, 507.)

Meramec Station

It was on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, nineteen miles from St. Louis, and had two stores, one public school, one wagon shop and an extensive limestone quarry. (--Campbell, 515.)

Meramec

Meramec is an independent city (part of St. Louis.) (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Meramec Forest

Mail is via Manchester; population 110. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Moline Acres

Moline Acres is one mile west of Bellefontaine Neighbors. Mail is via St. Louis. (--Rand McNally, 1974.)

Monarch

Monarch was in the northwest corner of the county, second station east of Franklin County line. On Rock Island Railroad. (--Williams, 507.)

Mokeville

Mokeville was a post-office four miles west of Bridgeton and contained one store and one blacksmith and wagon shop. (--Campbell, 515.)

Normandy

It was a post-office on the Natural Bridge Road, three and one-half miles south of Ferguson and contained one store and had in the vicinity one Catholic Church and one Catholic school. (--Campbell, 515.)

It is a branch of St. Louis post-office. (--Rand, McNally, 974.)

[19]

North St. Louis

North St. Louis, a town site then adjacent to St. Louis laid out by William T. Christy, William Chambers and Thomas Wright in 1816. The town extended from the river to Twelfth Street, and embraced the territory which is now between Manchester and Montgomery Streets. In the dedication by Messrs. Chamber, Christy and Clark, they gave a market square, school park, and church sites. This territory was made a part of the city by an expansion of the limits in 1841. (--Conard, Vol. IV, 593.)

There is a Northwoods (one mile northwest of Pinelawn; mail is via St. Louis.) Population 4,611. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Oakland

Oakland, on the Missouri Pacific R. R., twelve and one-quarter miles from St. Louis, was surrounded by fine residences. (--Campbell, 515.)

One of the most attractive stations on the Missouri Pacific R. R. ... The original name of Oakland was Hartwood, named after Henry Clay Hart. After Hart it came into the possession of E. W. Fox, who gave it the present name. (--Conard, Vol. V, 1.)

Mail is via St. Louis. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Old Orchard

A suburban town on the St. Louis & San Francisco R. R., (now B-N), seven and three-quarters miles from St. Louis. It takes its name from an apple orchard on a part of whose site it was built. It had several churches and many beautiful and well kept places. (--Conard, Vol. V, 10.)

It is a part of Webster Groves. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Old Town

Old Town is a part of Florissant. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Olivette elevation 600 feet

Olivette is a branch of St. Louis post-office; population 9,238. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[20]

Orrville

Orville was a post-office twenty-nine miles from St. Louis and contained one public school. (--Campbell, 515.)

Mail is via Chesterfield. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Owen's Station

The name by which the present town of Bridgeton ... was known prior to its incorporation in 1843. It was so called because an early fort erected there for protection against Indians was commanded by one William Owens. (--Conrad, Vol. V, 546; See, Conard, Vol. I, 372.)

"Pain de Sucre"

See Carondelet.

Pain Court

The early inhabitants of St. Louis called Carondelet "Vide Poche" -- "Empty Pocket"-- referring to the poverty of its first settlers. Carondelet retorted by calling St. Louis "Pain Court" -- "without bread" -- for which they found justification in the fact that most of the French settlers in St. Louis were traders and trappers, who did not produce a sufficient quantity of grain to supply the demand, a frequent scarcity of bread being the consequence. (--Conard, Vol. V, 43.)

Passionists Retreat

This retreat was founded in 1884 on a fifty-acre tract of land on Page Avenue, St. Louis, but afterward the place was sold to the Sisters of Visitation, and the Sisters then founded a house at Normandy where they attend St. Anne's Church built by Mrs. Anne L. Hunt. They teach only members of their own order for the ministry. The parent house is at Hoboken, New Jersey. (--Conard, Vol. V, 69.)

Patton's Store Pattonville

See FeeFee. (--Campbell, 515.)

[21]

Pond

Pond, a post-office twenty-six miles west of St. Louis, contained one store, one blacksmith and wagon shop, and one public school. (--Campbell, 515.)

The post-office was discontinued in 1905. (--Taft, 98.)

It is situated on Sec. 2, Twp. 49 N, R. 3 E on Highway 100 in the western portion of the county.

Mail is via Glencoe. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Quarantine

Quarantine, on the St. L. I. M. & S. R. R., eleven and one-quarter miles from St. Louis, was the location of the quarantine and small-pox hospital. (--Campbell, 515.)

Quarantine Island

The name given to the island previously called Arsenal Island when it passed into the possession of the city of St. Louis and became a quarantine station. The action of the river and decision of the Supreme Court of the United States gave it to Illinois. (See "Arsenal Island.") (--Conard, Vol. V, 261.)

Rock Hill elevation 528 feet

A post-office ten miles west of St. Louis and contained two general stores, and one public school, value about $1,500. (--Campbell, 515.)

It is an independent post-office. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Rock Spring

Rock Spring was one-half mile east of Taylorwick, and contained ten stores, one large (brick) hotel, four wagon shops, one large glue and one large soap factory, one Catholic Church and two public schools. (--Campbell, 516.)

Rock Spring is no longer listed in St. Louis Co.; there is a Rock Spring in St. Francois Co. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

[22]

Rose Hill

Rose Hill was on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, about fourteen miles from St. Louis, and was surrounded by fine residences. (--Campbell, 516.)

St. Ferdinand

See Florissant.

Sn Andre Misuri

West of St. Louis, James Mackay, a native of the parish of Kildonan County of Sutherland, northeast part of Scotland, and one of the first English-speaking settlers of upper Louisiana, established a settlement known as "Sn Andre del Misuri," ... This village (now in the river) was laid off by one John Henry, in that part of the Missouri River better known as Bon Homme ... (--Houck, Vol., II, 70.)

St. Louis Lat. 38 degrees 37' 28" N, Long. 90 degrees 15' 16" W.

When St. Louis was settled there were no post-offices on the west side of the Mississippi River. When Louisiana Territory was acquired post-offices were established in St. Louis, Ste. Genevieve, and St. Charles by Postmaster General Gideon Granger under Jefferson's administration. Rufus Eaton became the first postmaster at St. Louis, acting from July 4, 1804 until October 14, 1805, when he succeeded Edward Hemstead as a delegate in Congress. Up to 1823 there was only one mail line from Philadelphia to St. Louis, taking in Pittsburgh, Wheeling, Louisville, New Albany, Vincennes and Cahokia, going by horseback once a week from Pittsburgh to St. Louis. As late as 1808 (sic) the only mail routes west of Indiana and Kentucky, were to Vincennes and Ste. Genevieve and Cahokia, thence to St. Louis twice a month. (--Conard, Vol. V, 198.)

St. Louis as a Capital

Within two years after the settlement of St. Louis it became, in a sense, a seat of government. From 1766 to 1770 St. Ange de Bellrive was acting Governor of Upper Louisiana, and his official residence the post of St. Louis. The first Spanish Lieutenant Governor of the province came to St. Louis in 1770, and his successors governed the territory within their jurisdiction from this point until Louisiana was transferred to the United States. The formal transfer of Upper Louisiana from Spain to France, and from France to the United States in 1804 took place in St. Louis. After the Territory of Louisiana had been created by act of Congress it continued to be the seat of government and later the capital of Missouri Territory, until the State government was organized.

[23]

St. Louis (Cont)

With the erection of Missouri into a State, St. Louis ceased to be more than the capital of a county, the seat of government being fixed at St. Charles by act of the Legislature bearing date of November 28, 1820. For fifty years previous to that time, however, St. Louis had been officially recognized as a provincial and territorial capital. The capital was removed from St. Charles to Jefferson City in 1826.(--Conard, Vol. V, 450, 451.)

St. Louis was founded as the result of a fur trader's enterprise. In 1762 the firm of Maxent, Laclede & Co., formed in New Orleans, obtained from Louis Billouart de Kerlerlec, colonial Governor of Louisiana, a concession which gave them exclusive control of the fur trade with the Missouris and other tribes of Indians as far north as the River St. Peters. The junior member of this form was Pierre Liguest Laclede, commonly called Pierre Laclede, and to him was intrusted the establishment of a permanent trading post somewhere in the vicinity of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers. On the 3d of August, 1763, he embarked in primitive boats which had been loaded with goods for the Indian trade, and which were slowly and laboriously pushed up the Mississippi River. It had been his intention to store his goods at Ste. Genevieve while selecting a location for the trading post, but when he failed to find such accommodations as he needed he proceeded to Fort Chartres, which he reached three months after leaving New Orleans. After making such preliminary arrangements as were necessary, he left the fort to explore the country about the mouth of the Missouri River, and coming upon the site of St. Louis, in the course of his exploration was so impressed with its advantageous situation that he at once determined that here was a natural trade center. He found no aborigines laying claim to the site of the future city, and did not have to ask consent to occupy the lands necessary for his purpose. His young stepson, Auguste Choteau, had accompanied him, and to this lad he communicated his intention of establishing a trading post at this point, and marked the trees so that the boy could easily identify the spot upon his return. They then returned to Fort Chartres to make preparations for carrying forward the work planned, and not long after young Choteau, who was evidently an unusually intelligent and trustworthy youth, left the post, accompanied by about thirty men to enter upon the work of clearing a town site and building settler's cabins at St. Louis. This party came in boats by way of the river, and landed on the site of the present city, February 14, 1764. About the same time Laclede, who had traveled across the country from Fort Chartres, arrived there, and under his direction the work of laying out a town was begun by Auguste Choteau.

[24]

St. Louis (Cont)

The first trees were felled and the first cabins were erected on the block which afterward was occupied by the old "Chateau mansion." During the spring and summer of 1764 the work of laying out the town -- after the approved plan of French villages established in the Mississippi Valley -- and erecting houses for the settlers and the buildings in which Laclede was to carry on his trading operations progressed steadily, and when autumn came the settlement had a well-defined existence. The most pretentious of the buildings was that which was to be occupied by Laclede, and this was ready for occupancy in the early autumn of 1764. Laclede then brought to his trading post, which he named St. Louis, the stock of goods he had left at Fort Chartres. With this stock of goods designed for the Indian trade the commerce of the place began, and there was inaugurated the fur trade for which St. Louis was so long headquarters ... The transfer of the Illinois country to England by France, which took place shortly after St. Louis was founded, contributed somewhat to the growth of the new settlement on the west bank of the river, a considerable number of the French settlers at Cahokia, St. Phillipe, Prairie du Roche and other places moving to the west side of the river in the hope that they would here still be able to live under the French Government ... (--Conard, Vol. V, 461, 462.)

Small-pox first appeared in St. Louis in 1799, and hence the year was called "Annee de la Picotte." The winter following being unusually severe, the year 1800 was known among the people as "Annee du Grand Hiver." ...

In 1801 the Spanish Government established a military hospital at St. Louis, and of this hospital Dr. Saugrain was appointed Surgeon at a monthly salary of 30 dollars. St. Louis, says Austin, at that time contained more than two hundred houses, "some of them stone." ... (--Hist. of Missouri, 1908, Houck, Vol. II, 62, 63.)

After Laclede had established his trading post, a band of Peoria Indians were allowed to build a village at the lower end of the town, and this locality ... was called "Prairie Village, Sauvage."

After the settlement was begun the additional settlers, anxious to escape British rule, came to the new village, so that the end of the first year, 1766, forty families were congregated at the future metropolis, and which Laclede named "St. Louis," in honor of the sainted king of France. Popularly, however, the place was at first known as "Laclede's Village," and then as "Paincourt." It has been suggested that some of the early settlers, in grateful recognition of Laclede's services, proposed to call the town "Laclede." (Scharf's History of St. Louis, p. 69.) This sounds like a pious fiction. The first settlers of St. Louis, according to Pittman (Mississippi Settlements, p. 95) secured their

[25]

St. Louis (Cont)

flour from Ste. Genevieve, and hence probably the nick-name, "Paincourt" -- meaning without, or short of bread. (See, also, Reynold's Pioneer History of Illinois, p. 62.) (--Houck, Vol. II, 11, 12.)

Piernas, after his arrival in upper Louisiana, in a letter to Governor O'Reilly, says that the distance from New Orleans to the first settlement at Ste. Genevieve is 345 leagues at high water, but one-third more at low water. In this settlement the commandant was a french retired officer, De Rocheblaue, "but little affected towards the Spanish nation, none at all to the French and hated the English for their ungovernable and turbulent nation." His post was subservient "to the commandant and council of Paincourt." By this name Piernas means St. Louis, for by this name the village was then generally known. ... (1772 and later.) (--Ibid, Vol. I, 301.)

For many years it was a trading post for traders. Carondelet, formerly called Vide Poche, was first settled in 1767. The first brick house in St. Louis was erected in 1813. The first steamboat arrived there in 1812. The first brick pavement was laid in 1821. The first newspaper was commenced in July, 1808, by Joseph Charles, and received the name of Missouri Gazette, the germ of the later Missouri Republican. The first churches were erected by the Baptists and Roman Catholics in 1818, and by the Methodists and the Episcopalians, in 1820. The first English school was opened in St. Louis, in 1808, and the first school board was formed in 1817. John Jacob Astor established a branch fur house in this city in 1819. St. Louis was incorporated as a town November 9th, 1809, and as a city December 9th, 1822, when it contained a population of 5,000. Lafayette visited the city in April, 1825. In 1826, the United States Arsenal was authorized by Congress, but not completed for several years afterward ... In April, 1849, a great conflagration occurred, destroying over $3,000,000 worth of property. The first street cars were started July 4th, 1859, and the streets were first lighted by gas in 1847. (--Campbell's New Atlas of Mo., 1874, 70.)

St. Paul

See Sherman. (--Campbell, 512.)

Sappington

A post-office and settlement on the Gravois Road ... ten miles from St. Louis, named after one of the first settlers in that part of the county. (--Conard, Vol. V, 485.)

[26]

Sappington (Cont)

It contained three stores, one public school and one blacksmith and wagon shop. (--Campbell, 572.)

It is a branch of St. Louis post-office. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Sherman (St. Paul)

This place, on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, twenty-four miles from St. Louis, contained two stores, one public school, and one blacksmith and wagon shop. (--Campbell, 572.)

The railroad name is Jedburg. (--Rand McNally, 1974.).

Shoveltown

It is on By-Pass 67, on an unmarked county road north from Black Jack. (--Highway Map of St. Louis Co.)

Mail is via Florissant; population 50. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Shrewsbury elevation 485 feet

Mail is via St. Louis. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

South St. Louis

The name given to an addition to St. Louis, dedicated May 1, 1836, by Samuel S. Rayborn, William F. Stamps, John Withnell and twenty others. It included territory lying between the old arsenal and Mann's Hospital. The name, South St. Louis, as used in 1900, applied to all the southern portion of the city. (--Conard, Vol. VI, 29.)

Sunset Hill

Sunset Hill is one mile southwest of Crestwood. Mail is via St. Louis. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Sutton

Sutton was on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, seven and one-half miles from St. Louis. See Maplewood. (--Campbell, 572.)

[27]

Tara

The population is included with Affton. (--Rand McNally, 1974.)

Taylorwick

Taylorwick was on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, three and one-half miles from St. Louis, and contained one store and one M. E. Church South. The celebrated Shaw's Botanical Gardens is one-half mile south of this station. (--Campbell, 572.) It is no longer listed.

Valley elevation 425 feet

Valley, now Valley Park, in the Meramec River valley ... derived its name from the locale. During the summer vacation season, the town derives a considerable portion of its income from week-end holiday seekers, enjoying the attractions of the Meramec River valley. Its year 'round industries produce surgical cotton supplies, woodenware, varnish, lacquer, and concrete pipes ... (--The Empire That Missouri Pacific Serves, 251.)

It is an independent post-office. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Webster Groves elevation 595 feet

Generally known as Webster, one of the largest and most beautiful of the suburban towns near St. Louis. It is ... ten miles from the city. The Missouri Pacific Railroad runs through it and the "Frisco" (now B-N) Railroad runs a mile south of it. The place had a population of 2,500, with five large stone churches and a large school building. (--Conard, Vol. VI, 424.)

It is a branch of St. Louis post-office. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)

Webster Groves owes its name to Webster College, established by Artemas Ballard, a New Englander, who honored Daniel Webster. (--Eaton, 62.)

It had three stores, two churches, one good public school and one soldier's orphan asylum. (--Campbell, 572.)

Webster Park

A suburban town, about ten miles from St. Louis, and a quarter of a mile east of Webster Groves ... (--Conard, Vol. VI, 424.)

It is a part of Webster Groves. (--Rand, McNally, 1984.)

[28]

"West End"

A popular name for that part of St. Louis which lies west of the business district, and which included many of the handsomest residence districts of the city. (--Conard, Vol. VI, 332.)

Woodlawn

Woodlawn, on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, thirteen miles from St. Louis, was surrounded by fine residences. (--Campbell, 572.)

A beautiful and inviting suburban station on the Missouri Pacific Railroad ... half a mile east of Kirkwood. (--Conard, Vol. VI, 515.)

Woodlawn is no longer listed in St. Louis County. There is a Woodson Terrace two miles east of St. Ann. (--Rand McNally, 1974.)

Yeatman

Yeatman was a post-office on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, twenty-six miles from St. Louis. (--Campbell, 572.)

It has no population. (--Rand, McNally, 1974.)


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