A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Taney County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


Taney County

[1]

Ada

This is a post-office mentioned in General Scheme of Missouri, Dec. 1905, as used by R. M. S. (Railway Mail Service), hereafter referred to as General Scheme. The reference to Ada, is on page 111. It could not be located on available maps.

The original Ada, (in Ray County), 1854, was named for the wife of Eli Carter, its founder. (--University of Missouri Bulletin of Missouri Place Names, p. 72.)

Ameera

This post-office was mentioned in General Scheme, p. 111. It could not be located on available maps. Later, the post-office was discontinued and service was via Hillcrest.

The Ameera post-office was established July 31, 1903, with Elizabeth Wayland as post mistress. It was later run by Cora Allen and Seth Knapp. It was changed to Hill Crest, Sept. 5, 1906, because there was often mail missent there that was addressed to Aurora. (--Elmo Ingenthron.)

Bald Knob

This post-office was eleven miles north of Forsyth. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 618; also, see Map #34, Campbell's New Atlas of Missouri.)

Bauff

This post-office was twenty-five miles southeast of Forsyth. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 618.) It is shown on Map #34, Campbell's New Atlas of Missouri, as being in the southeast corner of the county, near the Ozark County line.

It was established Nov. 15, 1858, at the junction of the road that ran from Yellville to Rockbridge. That is where the Forsyth road branched off. Mail service was discontinued there, Jan. 12, 1894. (--Elmo Ingenthron.)

Bee Creek

This post-office was fourteen miles south of Forsyth. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 618.)

[2]

Bluff

The earliest post-office to be listed under this name, is for 1897-98. (--Missouri Manual, 1897-98, p. 422.)

It was a trading point on Bull Creek, near the Christian County line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

It was at the west end of Gravelly Hollow, and was located at township 24 N, range 21 W, section 3. (Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri, 1-25-65.)

The history of Bluff runs from 1893 to 1928. (--Elmo Ingenthron.)

Bradleyville

This is a post-office and store sixteen miles northwest of Forsyth. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 618.)

It is listed in Missouri Manual, 1897-98, p. 422.

It is located at township 24 N, range 18 W, sections 10 & 11, on Highways 125 & 76. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Branson

One of the larger towns in Taney County, in The Shepherd of the Hills Country, Branson was named for R. S. Branson, first postmaster, who took office June 13, 1882.

The name of the post-office and community center was changed to Lucia in 1901, and remained so until 1904, when it was changed back to Branson. (--Elmo Ingenthron.)

It is mentioned on page 422 of Missouri Manual, 1897-98.

It is located at township 23 N, range 21 W, section 31, at the intersection of Highways 76 & 65. It is on Lake Taneycomo.

Brown Branch

This post-office is six miles northeast of Bradleyville, on the road to Roy, Douglas County. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

It is located at township 24 N, range 17 W, section 4, on Highway 76. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

[3]

Cedar Creek

This is one of the older post-offices in Taney Co. It is first mentioned in Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 618. "It is a post-office twelve miles southeast of Forsyth."

It is shown on a map in The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.

It is located at township 22 N, range 19 W, section 24. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Cedar Valley

The earliest reference to this post-office was in Missouri Manual, 1897-98, p. 422.

It was twelve and one-half miles southwest of Kirbyville, near the Stone County line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

The post-office was discontinued between June 1, 1935 and June 1, 1939. Thereafter mail was supplied from Point Lookout. (--Missouri Manual, 1939, p. 937.)

Later, Cedar Valley was known as Oasis, and more recently it was swallowed up by Table Rock Lake. (--English Village in the Ozarks, The Story of Hollister, Missouri, by Edith McCall, p. 19. Copyright, used by permission.)

Comoville

There was a post-office here in 1933-34. (--Missouri Manual, 1933-34, p. 902.) No other listings noted.

Day

This was a trading point, four and one-half miles northwest of Walnut Shade. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

It was located at township 24 N, range 21 W, section 6, on Highway 176, west of 65, at the north end of Jackson Hollow. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Dewey Bald

This post-office is listed in Missouri Manual, 1917-18, p. 636; it was discontinued as of October 31, 1919. Mail thereafter was supplied from Branson. (--Missouri Manual, 1919-20, p. 732.)

[4]

Dickens

This town was five miles northeast of Forsyth. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

It was named Dickens, for the English writer, Charles Dickens. (--White River Valley Historical Society Quarterly, Summer, 1963, p. 8.)

It was located at township 24 N, range 19 W, section 33, on Highway 76, southwest of Taneyville. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Dit

This former post-office is first listed in Missouri Manual, 1897-98, p. 422; however this book listed the post-office as having been in Ozark County. It is also listed in General Scheme, p. 111. Later editions of Missouri Manual indicated that it is in Taney County.

It was eighteen miles southeast of Bradleyville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

East View

This former post-office, as of 1905, is listed in General Scheme, p. 111.

It was five miles southeast of Brown Branch. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

It was about fifteen miles directly east of Taneyville, near the Ozark County line. (--Map of Western States, Rand, McNally, 1911.)

Emery

This post-office is listed in Missouri Manual, 1911-12, p. 576. No other information could be found.

Fairview

This name is used for the town name in 30 states, so the Post-Office Department called a halt to use of this name for post-office.

It is one of the most popular names for a town site in the State of Missouri, as there are about 16 towns by this name in reference books of Missouri. There are about five towns by this name in Southwest Missouri.

[5]

Fairview (Cont)

They are located thusly: (1) Texas Co., on Highway 38, two miles east of Bendavis; (2) Newton Co., on Highway 86, two miles west of Barry Co. line. This Fairview is the only Fairview post-office in Missouri. (3) Laclede Co., near Conway, (church only). (4) somewhere in McDonald Co., (5) Taney Co., is located at township 23 N, range 17 W, sections 31 & 32, on Highway 125, north of Highway 160. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by the State Highway Commission of Missouri. Also, 1970 Map of Missouri.)

There was once a Fairview in Franklin Co., the one in Lincoln Co., has been changed to Millwood. It was a post-office which was established in 1886, and was discontinued in 1904. Fairview in Nodaway Co., was established in 1875, by John Bilby, who came from Illinois to Missouri where he bought several thousand acres of land. He was first postmaster of Fairview; originally the site was known as Whig Valley.

Denver, in Worth Co., was first called Fairview. Fairview was used by W. W. Howe as his fictitious name for Bethany in Harrison Co. in his famous novel, Story of a Country Town.

Fairview was also an addition to Hannibal; Fairview, in Pettis Co., was a post-office since 1860, in north part of Elkfork township. It is not known when the post-office was discontinued.

Fairview, in Randolph Co., see Cairo; Fairview, in St. Francois Co., see Haggai; Fairview, in Vernon Co., a town in southwest corner of Drywood township, laid out by Thomas R. Dawes, before the Civil War, (Vernon Co., history, p. 572); the word is used as a descriptive term.

It is in St. Louis Co., on the Mo. Pac. R. R. 9 miles west of St. Louis, as shown in Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874. (--Information Concerning the Various Town Sites of Fairview, courtesy of The State Historical Society of Mo.)

Forsyth or Forsythe

The county seat and principal town of Taney County, is situated on the north bank of White River, (now Bull Shoals Lake), about four miles northwest of the center of the county. It was settled about 1838, and had a steady growth until the Civil War, during which it was entirely destroyed. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 618.)

It was named for John Forsyth of Georgia, (1780-1841) Secretary of State, 1834-1841. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, p. 57.)

It was once the headquarters of the Baldknobbers, an organization formed July 4, 1884. (--Missouri Writers Program, p. 485.)

[6]

Forsyth or Forsythe (Cont)

It is located at township 24 N, range 20 W, sections 32 & 33, on Highway 160. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Flag

This post-office was in the western part of the county, near the Stone Co. line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

It was a post-office in 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 111.)

Garber

The earliest post-office listed here was in 1897-98. (--Missouri Manual, p. 424.)

It is also listed in General Scheme, p. 111, as of 1905.

The place is also known as Garber Bald. (--University of Missouri Bulletin of Place Names, p. 125.)

Goodloe

This post-office is first listed in 1897-98. (--Missouri Manual, p. 422.)

It was five miles southeast of Bradleyville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

Gretna

This post-office is first listed in General Scheme, p. 111, as of 1905.

It is also listed as a post-office in 1911-12. (--Missouri Manual, 1911-12, p. 576.)

It was located at township 23 N, range 22 W, section 25, near Roark Creek, northwest of Branson. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Greenleaf

This post-office was listed in Missouri Manual, 1911-12, p. 576.

[7]

Groom

This post-office was twelve and one-half miles south of Kissee Mills. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

There was a post-office here in 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 111.)

The post-office was discontinued as of July 31, 1917. Thereafter it was served from Cedar Creek.

It was located at township 22 N, range 19 W, section 25 on Highway M, south of Cedar Creek. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Hercules

The first post-office to be listed was in 1897-98. (--Missouri Manual, 1897-98, p. 425.)

It was eight miles southeast of Bradleyville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

There was a post-office here in 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 111.)

It was discontinued between June 1, 1935 and June 1, 1939; thereafter it was supplied from Bradleyville. (--Missouri Manual, 1939, p. 937.)

It was located at township 23 N, range 17 W, section 6.

Hilda

This post-office was first listed in 1897-98. (--Missouri Manual, 1897-98, p. 425.)

Another listing was for 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 111.)

It was located at township 23 N, range 18 W, section 19, on Highway 160, north of the M intersection. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

John T. Mosley started Hilda post-office at Beaver Mills located on Beaver Creek at the mouth of Cane Creek in 1896. It was named Hilda for his first wife. (--Elmo Ingenthron.)

[8]

Hollister

In the 1890's following the development of zinc and lead mines around Galena and Joplin, mineral deposits were found along Turkey Creek, in a line extending up from Lead Hill, Ark. Later a ferry was established at the mouth of Turkey Creek to cross White River.

In 1904, Reuben Kirkham opened a store at the cross roads along the railroad right of way, in a building erected by Jim Holliday.

A log building which had been an exhibit for the State of Maine at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis in 1904, had been purchased by a group of St. Louis Sportsmen, and rebuilt on the bluffs at Point Lookout. It was called the Maine Club.

Later, a pear orchard, said to have been the largest one in the world was planted between what is now Hollister and Point Lookout. This acreage became known as Maine Orchard and some people began to use that name for the little settlement just north of it.

Mr. Kirkham, who once had lived near Hollister, Calif., noted the similarity of the Ozark hills to the gentle hills in Calif., had applied for permission to open a post-office in the corner of his store building. He asked that the name Hollister be given to the new post-office. Hollister it became, and Mr. Kirkham its first post-master, officially on June 18, 1904.

When the railroad set up a box car not far from the store, to serve as a temporary depot, it, too, bore the name Hollister. (--English Village in the Ozarks, the Story of Hollister, Mo., by Edith McCall. Copyright, used by permission, pp. 15, 20, 21.)

It is located at township 22 N, range 21 W, sections 9 & 10, on Highways 65 & BB, across Lake Taneycomo from Branson. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Irma

This post-office was six miles north of Garber. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

There was a post-office here in 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 111.)

It was located at township 24 N, range 22 W, section 26, at the junction of Highways 148 & 160. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.

[9]

Jody

This post-office of 1905 is mentioned on page 111 of General Scheme. No other reference could be found.

Kirbyville

This post-office is eight miles south, southwest of Forsyth. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 618.

There was a post-office here in 1897-98. (--Missouri Manual, 1897-98, p. 426.)

It was seven and one-half miles southwest of Forsyth. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

It is located at township 22 N, range 21 W, section 12, on Highways J & 86. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Kissee Mills

There was a post-office here in 1897-98. (--Missouri Manual, 1897-98, p. 426.)

It is six miles east of Forsyth. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

It is located at township 24 N, range 20 W, sections 25 & 26, on Highways 160 & O, near Bull Shoals Lake. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Lucia

This post-office was established in 1902. It was named for the wife of E. P. Brice, post-master. (--University of Missouri Bulletin of Place Names, p. 73.)

It was located five miles west of Kirbyville. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

It was the Branson post-office for four years. See, Branson. (--Elmo Ingenthron.)

McClurg

There was a post-office here in 1897-98. (--Missouri Manual, 1897-98, p. 427.)

It is in the northeast corner of the county, near the Ozark County line. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

It is located at township 24 N, range 17 W, section 1, on Highway W. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

(10)

McFarland

This post-office was eight miles east of Walnut Shade, or two and one-half miles north of Forsyth. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

It was about twelve miles southeast of Day. (--Map of Western States, Rand McNally, 1911.)

There was a post-office here in 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 111.)

Melva

This post-office was about two miles south of Hollister, on the Missouri-Pacific R. R. (--Map of Western States, Rand, McNally, 1911)

There was a post-office here in 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 111.)

Melva was started with the coming of the railroad in 1906. It was discontinued in 1931. The whole village was blown away by a cyclone and never rebuilt. Several people were killed in the storm. (--Elmo Ingenthron.)

Mildred

This post-office was established in 1906. It was named for the daughter of the first postmaster. (--University of Missouri Bulletin of Place Names, p. 73.)

There was a post-office here in 1911-12. (--Missouri Manual, 1911-12, p. 527.)

It is located at township 23 N, range 20 W, section 21, on Highways MM & 86. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Mincy

This post office is first listed in 1897-98. (--Missouri Manual, 1897-98, p. 527.)

It was six and one-half miles southeast of Kirbyville, and ten miles south of Forsyth. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

It is located at township 22 N, range 20 W, section 16, on Highway J. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

[11]

Nance

This post-office, first listed in 1911-12, was on Big Creek, southeast of Reuter, near the Ozark County line. It was named for the Nance family. The post-office was discontinued in 1925; mail thereafter was supplied from Ocie, (Ozark Co.) (--Missouri Manuals, 1911-12, p. 577; 1924-25, p. 977. Map of Western States, Rand, McNally, 1911; Elmo Ingenthron.)

Nancy

This post-office or hamlet had a short life, from 1905 to 1908. The exact location is unknown. (--Elmo Ingenthron.)

Oasis

There was a post-office here in 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 111.)

It was about seven miles west of Pinetop, near the Stone County line. (--Map of Western States, Rand, McNally, 1911.)

Later it was swallowed up by Table Rock Lake. (--English Village in the Ozarks, The Story of Hollister, Missouri, by Edith McCall, p. 19. Copyright, used by permission.)

See, also, Cedar Valley.

Osaka

This post-office, which was established in 1908, was named for the city in Japan. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, p. 35.)

It was discontinued as of July 31, 1917. Thereafter it was served from Bradleyville. (--Missouri Manual, 1917-18, p. 644.)

Ozark Beach

This town was located at township 23 N, range 20 W, section 7, on the south side of Lake Taneycomo, west of Powersite. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Pedrow

In the early 1880's, William Pedrow Moberly and his wife settled on Bull Creek, about one and one-half miles above the mouth of the stream.

In addition to the grinding mill, Moberly constructed a water-powered saw mill.

[12]

Pedrow (Cont)

In April 1902, William Moberly established a post-office at the mill site, by enclosing a portion of his front porch, naming the new office Pedrow, which was taken from his middle name.

For a period of time around the turn of the century, railroad ties were bought and delivered to the mouth of Bull Creek where they were yarded and fashioned into rafts to be floated down White River to markets in Arkansas.

Marion Woods, finding the place inviting for mercantile business, established a store near the mill. Some distance farther up the creek, Freddie Miller established a harness shop to serve the local people and the "freighters" using the old Harrison-Springfield Road. On the river a short distance above the mouth of Bull Creek, William Hensley operated a ferry serving the north-south travel.

In 1906, the White River Iron Mountain Railway Company completed a railroad through Branson, Missouri, which soon slowed to a trickle the commerce on the old Harrison-Springfield Road. Business at Wood's Store and Freddie Miller's harness shop declined.

The Pedrow post-office was discontinued in March of 1913. The Moberlys moved away, reportedly to near Golden City. (--White River Valley Historical Society Quarterly, Spring, 1963, pp. 5 & 6.)

It was four and one-half miles southeast of Walnut Shade. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

It is interesting to note there was a Pedro in Barton Co., in 1897-98. (--Missouri Manual, 1897-98, p. 428.)

Protem

This post-office was established in 1870. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, p. 115.)

The perennial struggle waged by our local postmasters with the Post Office Department in Washington, has provided some of our best place name jokes. One postmaster was instructed that he could use any name protem until he had made up his mind. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, p. 112.)

It is located at township 21 N, range 17 W, section 5, at the intersection of Highways 125 & D. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

[13]

Ransom

"It was no town at all. It was the name of a post-office mother started in her home in 1907. Then Grandmother ran it a short time. It served a rather local neighborhood. It was discontinued in 1911." (--Elmo Ingenthron.)

It was about two miles east of Walnut Shade. (--Map of Western States, Rand, McNally, 1911.)

Reuter

This post-office, established in 1880, was named for Reuter, the first postmaster. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, p. 68.)

There was a post-office here in 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 111.)

It has disappeared or is no longer in use. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, p. 144.)

It was located at township 22 N, range 17 W, section 7, at the intersection of Highways 125 & 160. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Commission of Missouri.)

Ridgedale

This small town is near the Arkansas border, and is located at township 21 N, range 21 W, sections 20 & 21. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Pinetop

This post-office was about three miles south of Melva, on the Missouri-Pacific R. R. (Map of Western States, Rand, McNally, 1911.)

There was a post-office here in 1905. (--General Scheme, p. 111.)

It can be assumed that the name derives from the Pine Trees prevalent in the vicinity. (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, p. 86.)

Pope

This post-office was discontinued as of July 31, 1917, thereafter it was served from Walnut Shade. (--Missouri Manual, 1917-18, p. 644.)

No other information could be found.

[14]

Point Lookout

This is one of the more famous post-offices in Taney County. The School of the Ozarks is located here.

It is located at township 22 N, range 21 W, section 7, on Highway V, near 65. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Powersite

This town is located near the dam on Lake Taneycomo. It is located on Highway VV, between Highways 86 & MM. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

The post-office was first listed in 1913-14, and is still listed as of 1970. (--Missouri Manuals, 1913-14, p. 600; 1969-70, p. 1497.)

Rill

This post-office was about three miles east of Bluff. (--Map of Western States, Rand McNally, 1911.)

There was a post-office here in 1911-12. (--Missouri Manual, 1911-12, p. 577.)

Rockaway Beach

Willard Merriam, a member of a Realty and Insurance Co., of Kansas City, Kans., learned of the plans for the Empire District Electric Dam to be built in Taney County ... Mr. Merriam purchased over 600 acres of land in Taney County with Rockaway Beach as the focal point, and along with his wife, he proceeded to make a real estate project out of this project ...

Up to this time mail was addressed "Rockaway Beach, on Lake Taneycomo, via Branson, Mo." The first post-office was established (Jan. 31, 1919) with the name "Taneycomo, Missouri." The first postmaster, Jacob Mueller, figured the name of the resort might be duplicated elsewhere, and he circulated a petition to Washington, D. C., and so the name was changed to and has remained "The Rockaway Beach Post-Office." Mr. Mueller was postmaster until George Puchta was appointed in March, 1939.

The first store was built and operated by Jacob Mueller and his wife on the present property known today as "George's Store."

Taneycomo, so named, is a contraction of Taney County, Missouri, "Taney-Co-Mo," and Rockaway Beach is located right on the shores of the Lake, and this is something you can't find on a Government Lake, "to my knowledge." -- Stephen Burton. (--White River Valley Historical Society Quarterly, Spring 1963, pp. 16 & 19.)

[15]

Ruthy

This post-office was about three miles northeast of Protem, near the Ozark County line. (--Map of Western States, Rand, McNally, 1911.)

There was a post-office here in 1911-12. (--Missouri Manual, 1911-12, p. 577.)

Swan

This post-office was located at township 24 N, range 20 W, section 2, on Highway AA, northeast of Taneyville, on Swan Creek, at the confluence of Blue Creek. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

There was a post-office here in 1897-98, p. 431.

Mail was carried by horseback from Chadwick twice a week. (To Garrison.) The same rider carried mail onto the Swan post-office on Blue Creek. (--Christian County, Its First 100 Years, copyright, used by permission, p. 152.)

Taney City

This post-office is listed in A Reminiscent History of The Ozark Region, Goodspeed Bros., Chicago, 1894, p. 31.

It is also listed in Missouri Manual, 1893-94, p. 297. No other listings noted.

Taneyville

There was a post-office here in 1897-98. Also, in 1905. (--Missouri Manual, 1897-98; General Scheme, p. 111.)

By 1891, Taneyville had grown into a thriving little town located very near the center of Taney County. The town was first laid out by Henderson and Wilkey; but at a later date another man by the name of Johnston laid out another plot which was called Taneyville. There were just two houses built in the area -- The Kilby and Gordon homes. What we call Taneyville is "Taney City, North Division," by the plat and courthouse records. The government named the post-office Taneyville, which was likely responsible for the town being called Taneyville instead of Taney City.

Early business houses include a hotel which is still standing. The building was also used for a post-office and store. Other businesses included a Town Hall, in which a drug store and barbershop were operated; a print shop, a furniture store, camp house, and livery barn and hotel, run by a Mr. Speakman. Right after the turn of the century, a Mr. Osborne operated a hotel, livery stable, and harness shoe shop.

[16]

Taneyville (Cont)

There was a brick-yard just west of town operated by a Mr. Crutchfield.

A railroad was surveyed through the town, but it was never built. It did lead to having the town platted and the streets named. (--Ray Stout, in The White River Valley Historical Society Quarterly, Spring, 1963, pp. 7 & 8.)

It is located at township 24 N, range 19 W, section 28, on Highways 76, AA & FF. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

Taney City was a pre-civil war hamlet settled in 1858. It was located at Taneyville. I think Taneyville is perhaps the north division of Taney City. The use of the name Taney City was discontinued in 1894 and the use of the name Taneyville was started then. It is all and the same place. (--Elmo Ingenthron.)

Thistle

This town was at the confluence of Big Beaver Creek, and Cane Fork. (--Campbell's New Atlas of Missouri, Map #34.)

Tidwell

This post-office is listed in A Reminiscent History of the Ozark Region, Goodspeed Bros., Chicago, 1894, p. 31.

It is also listed in Missouri Manual, 1893-94, p. 297.

No other listings noted.

Walnut Shade

This post-office is eight and one-half miles northwest of Forsyth. (--The State of Missouri, in 1904, p. 527.)

The post-office is first listed in 1897-98. (--Missouri Manual, 1897-98, p. 431.)

It is located at township 24 N, range 21 W, section 33, on Highways 176 & 160. (--Highway Map of Taney County, as issued by The State Highway Commission of Missouri.)

It had its origin in 1860 when Samuel Weatherman started a business there. (--Elmo Ingenthron)

Windy

This post-office is listed in the Missouri Manual, 1905-06, p. 389. It is also listed in General Scheme, p. 111.

No other listings noted.


Taney County Table of Contents
Local History Home