A Directory of Towns, Villages, and Hamlets
Past and Present
of Texas County, Missouri

Compiled by Arthur Paul Moser


Texas County

[1]

Alice

A village in Morris Township. A post-office since 1888, named for Alice Embree, daughter of J. M. Embree, a settler from Tennessee. (See Ruth). (--Place Names.)

It was discontinued as of Nov. 1, 1927. Thereafter it was supplied from Ben Davis. (--Missouri Manual, 1927-28, pp. 814-815.)

Arroll

A village in Date Township. A post-office from 1900 to 1915; re-established in 1934. When the post-office was opened, the name Carroll was suggested but the Department found that was used, so they clipped off the "C" and named the office Arroll. (--Place Names.)

Arroll was located at Sections 8, 9, 17, 16, Township 28 N, Range 7 W, on Highway W, south from Midvale, where it turns East. (--General Highway Map of Texas County, issued by The Missouri State Highway Department, 6-1-68. Unless otherwise specified, all map descriptions are from this map.)

Arroll post-office was discontinued July 31, 1917. Thereafter it was supplied from Summersville. (--Missouri Manual, 1917-18, p. 644.)

Armstrong's Store

In central Morris Township. A tourist supply store on Highway 17. Named for the owner, C. H. Armstrong. (--Place Names.)

Ashley Cave

A post-office established in 1937 in Current Township, named for the cave, which is a land mark in the community. The cave is named for William Henry Ashley, who used the cave as a post for his fur trade. Originally a merchant and surveyor in St. Louis, he entered the fur trade after the American fur trade was established.

Much later, with the Sublette brothers, Robert Campbell and Jim Bridger, he established the Rocky Mountain Fur Co. (--Place Names.)

Ashley Creek

This small hamlet was located in Section 10, Township 31 N, Range 7 W. It was on Highway AY, north of T, near the Dent County line.

[2]

Bado

A village in Morris Township. It was established during the Civil War (c. 1863) by Mr. Clabe Groce. The present (1933) postmaster has always lived within a mile of the office and has heard that it was so called because it was settled during the bad years. The name was used long before it became a post-office in 1888. (--Place Names.)

Bado was located at Section 34, Township 30 N, Range 11 W, on Highway M, south of Fairview, and north of YY.

Baldridge

Baldridge has been in two counties, Pulaski, and later in Texas County. According to Evening in Wisconsin Edition of Rand, McNally Atlas, 1896, p. 48, Baldridge was in Pulaski Co. Later, it was moved to Texas Co. It was named by a grandson, J. M. Baldridge, in honor of Carter Baldridge, an early settler whose house was the first county seat. (--Place Names.)

Baldridge was near Evening Shade, according to a map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.

The post-office was discontinued as of 11-1-1927, thereafter it was supplied from Evening Shade. (--Missouri Manual, 1927-28, pp. 814-815. 1897-1898, p. 421, where it is located in Pulaski County.)

Bend

A post-office in a farm house in Roubidoux Township in 1879. Named because it was located on a bend in Roubidoux Creek. (--Place Names.)

Bendavis

In southeast Morris Township. A post-office since 1910. Named by James J. Burns who hoped to build a town at the place and at the same time advertise the Ben Davis Apple which he grew in his large orchard. The town existed only on paper, however. An elaborate plat is recorded in the county seat, but only a store and post-office mark the place. (--Place Names.)

It was located at Sections 13 & 24, Township 30 N, Range 12 W, on Highways 38 & B.

[3]

Big Creek

Big Creek is a village named for the creek on which the village is located, ten miles southeast of Houston, and twenty miles northeast of Cabool, in Ozark Township. In 1855, the following business men were listed: H. M. Williams, merchant, postmaster and owner of flouring mill; P. Barclow, saw-mill owner; F. Nagle, cabinet-maker; J. W. Frederick, wagon-maker; John Morrissey and R. B. Hanes, Blacksmiths; J. A. Kirman, physician. (--State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., p. 491.)*

It was a post-office, twelve miles southeast of Houston. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, p. 620.)

A village in Ozark Township. A post-office from 1876 to 1904. Named for the creek on which it was located.

*Correction by Mrs. Louise Johnson, Librarian, Houston, Mo.

Blooming Rose

It appears on a list of post-offices for 1856.

Also, it is shown on Map #33 of Campbell's New Atlas of Missouri, 1874, as being in Boone Township. However, the present (or last noted location) is in Phelps Co. (U. S. Postal Guide; Mrs. Louise Johnson.)

Blue Moon

See Mitchell Store. (--Place Names.)

Bucyrus

A village in Piney Township. A post-office in 1899. The village was first called Odd (1895-1897) by Ransom D. Lynch, who thought the name a distinctive one. The Postal Authorities objected, and the name was changed to Bucyrus, for the town in Ohio which had been Mrs. Lynch's birth place. Ransom D. Lynch was for many years a leading citizen in Texas Co. Before his death in 1937, he was the oldest living native resident of the county. According to Gannett, the city of Bucyrus, Ohio, was named by Col. James Kilbourne. He gives two explanations for the colonel's choice. Two women, daughters of Samuel Morton, say he named it for his favorite character, Cyrus, King of Persia, to which the "bu" was prefixed, referring to the beautiful country. An old citizen, F. Adams, says that it was named by Col. Kilbourne for Busiris in Ancient Egypt. The latter seems to be more likely the origin of the name. (--Place Names.)

Bucyrus was located at Section 34, Township 31 N, Range 10 W, at the junction of Highways 17 & Z, northwest of Houston.

[4]

Burkhart Mills or Mill

An early saw-mill built on the Big Piney about 1826. Named for Josiah L. Burkhart, owner. (--Place Names.)

Cabool

Cabool was surveyed in September, 1882, for Ralph and Frances G. Walker, who acknowledged the plat September 27, that year. The Cedar Bluff Post-Office, one-fourth mile east of Cabool was established "years ago," William B. Bradshaw being postmaster from 1852 to 1882, when George Pettigrew was commissioned. In 1883 the office was transferred to Cabool, where Mr. Pettigrew has served since, except for ten months in 1884, when J. W. Gorman held the office.

The village was incorporated November 8, 1884. (--State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., pp. 482, 483.)

Cabool, a railroad town in Burdine Township, was established in 1882 and a post-office since that date. Named for the capital of Afghanistan, now spelled Cabul or Kabul, by Ralph and Frances Walker, who were real estate promoters. Mrs. Walker never came to Cabool, and then Walker left as soon as the enterprise was underway. The dedication of streets and alleys was made at Springfield, 100 miles away. A local legend asserts that the town was named after an Indian Chief, Cabool, who kidnapped the daughter of Chief Pomona. When her father brought his braves to seek vengeance, Cabool and his maiden Tahassie plunged to their deaths over a cliff rather than be separated. (--Place Names.)

Cabool was named for the capital of Afghanistan (now usually spelled Cabul or Kabul.) (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, Ramsay, p. 35.)

It is located at Sections 11, 12, 1 & 2, Township 28 N, Range 11 W, on Highways 60, M, 63, 181 & PP.

Carlisle

A post-office, listed in 1867. Probably named for the family of R. W. Carlisle, who lived near Licking. He was an influential farmer. (Exact location is unknown.)

Casto

A post-office, eighteen miles southeast of Houston. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, p. 620; Map #33 New Atlas of Missouri, Campbell.) Casto is now in Shannon Co., (q. v.).

Casto Valley

It appears on a list of post-offices in the U. S. Postal Guide, 1856. It is now in Shannon Co., (q. v.).

[5]

Cedar Bluff

It appears on a list of post-offices, U. S. Postal Guide, 1856.

It was a post-office, eighteen miles south, southwest of Houston. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, 1874, p. 620.)

Cedar Bluff was a post-office just about a mile from Cabool, and when the railroad came through the section and Cabool was established, the office was closed. Named for its location on a Cedar Bluff. (See Cabool.) (--Place Names.)

Centre

A post-office, in 1867. An office which lasted only a few years; so named because it was half way between Houston and Plato. (--Place Names.)

Chestnut

In Roubidoux Township. A post-office from 1899 to 1901. Named for a grove of trees near the office. (--Place Names.)

Clara

A village in Piney Township. A post-office since 1902. Named for the wife of Haden Lynch, postmaster and prominent citizen. He was a grandson of John Lynch, one of Texas County's first settlers. (--Place Names.)

Clara was located at Section 15, Township 30 N, Range 10 W, at the junction of Highways Z & AU.

Clear Spring (also spelled Springs)

A village in Pierce Township, a post-office since 1880; it was listed as Clearspring, from 1897 to 1910. Named for the unusually fine spring in the vicinity. (--Place Names.)

It was located at Section 8, Township 28 N, Range 8 W, on Highway Y, approximately one and one-half miles south and east of 137. Near the Howell Co. line.

[6]

Clyde

A proposed village in Pierce Township. Surveyed in 1871. The name was selected by an old merchant named Ira Martin; but no one remembers why he had chosen the name. There was never a village or post-office at the place. (--Place Names.)

Clyde was surveyed in 1871 and acknowledged by Ira Martin Mar. 6, that year. The location in Township 31, Section 8, is now John R. Martin's farm, (1889). (--State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., p. 492.)

Cork Mill

See Ormsby Mill. (--Place Names.)

Coulstone

This is another village which has been claimed by two counties. It was in Sherrill Township on the Dent County line. It was listed in Texas County from 1883 to 1918; in Dent Co., since 1926. It was named for W. R. E. Coulstone, merchant.

It was approximately four miles northeast of Licking, near the Dent Co. line. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.: Mrs. Louise Johnson.)

Covert

A village in Lynch Township. A post-office in 1915. Named for J. A. Covert, postmaster. (--Place Names.)

It was southwest of Licking and north of Prescott. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.; Mrs. Louise Johnson.)

The post-office was discontinued July 31, 1917. Thereafter, it was supplied from Prescott. (--Missouri Manual, 1917-1918, p. 644.)

Date

A post-office from 1893 to 1896. (--Place Names.)

It was in the southeast part of the county, east of Varvel, near the Shannon Co. line. (--Post Route Map of Missouri, 1959. Published by Postmaster General Arthur E. Summerfield, Apr. 1, 1959.)

David

A hamlet in Spring Creek Township. Named for David Zellweiger, storekeeper and postmaster. (--Place Names.)

[7]

Dent

A village in Boone Township. A post-office since 1901. The village was named for the Dent family, who were prominent in the district. (--Place Names.)

Dent was approximately one mile southwest of Sherrill and approximately two miles south of the Phelps Co. line. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.; Mrs. Louise Johnson.)

The post-office was discontinued "in past three years," as of October 1, 1933. Thereafter it was supplied from Kinderpost. (--Missouri Manual, 1933-1934, p. 896.)

Dunn (Impo post-office, q. v.)

It was four miles east of Mountain Grove, and approximately five miles west of Cabool. (--Tydol Oil Co., Map of Missouri, (as of 1950 census.))

Dunn is located at Sections 5 & 6, Township 29 N, Range 12 W, near Highway 60, near the junction with MM.

Dykes

A village in Morris Township. A post-office since 1876. Named for John Dykes, who settled there in early days. (--Place Names.)

Dykes was a post-office, ten miles west of Houston. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, 1874, p. 620.)

It was sixteen miles northeast of Mountain Grove, and was the location of H. W. Worsham's post-office store. James Avery, the blacksmith, and William Kaney, the telegraph agent, were here in 1885. (--State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., p. 491; Mrs. Louise Johnson.)

The post-office was discontinued in "past three years," as of October 1, 1933. Thereafter it was supplied from Bucyrus. (--Missouri Manual, 1933-1934, p. 896.)

Dykes was located at Section 2, Township 30 N, Range 11 W, on Highway 38, east of FF.

Edanville

It was in northwest Boone Township. A post-office from 1893 to 1927. Named because of the beauty of the country side. The region is a very lonely section and will ultimately become part of the National Forest. In the Texas Co. platbook, it is apparently misspelled Evansville. The name Edanville is probably a misspelling for Eden. (--Place Names.)

It was approximately one-half mile south of the Pulaski Co. line, and about one and one-half miles north of Evening Shade. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.)

The post-office was discontinued as of Nov. 1, 1927. Thereafter it was supplied from Evening Shade. (--Missouri Manual, 1927-1928, pp. 814-815.)

[8]

Elk Creek

A village in Cass Township. A post-office since 1867. Named for the Moose or Wapiti, locally called Elk, that once roamed over that portion of the county. Settled by Virginians, the village has always been considered the cultural center of Texas County. (--Place Names.)

Elk Creek, twelve miles south of Houston, is the post-office center of the district. In 1885, there were four church organizations and a well-attended academy here. Austin Grisham had charge of the post-office; J. J. Bradbury was general merchant; Bradford & Brown, blacksmiths; W. Nall kept the hotel and C. Salisbury carried on the flouring mill. (--State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., 1889, p. 491.)

It was located at Section 13, Township 29 N, Range 10 W, at the junction of Highways H & C, approximately one and one-half mile east of 63.

Ella?

The post-office was discontinued July 31, 1917. There after it was supplied from Dora. (Location is unknown.) (--Missouri Manual, 1917-1918, p. 644.)

Ellis Prairie

A village northwest of Houston in Lynch Township. A post-office since 1879. Named for Washington Asa Ellis, a pioneer in the region. It is located on Prairie land. (--Place Names.)

Ellis Prairie post-office was established in 1879, at a point nine miles northwest of the county seat and twenty-five miles north of Cabool. Alfred Crosthwaite was postmaster, and J. G. McClernon owner and operator of a saw mill. (--State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., p. 491.)

It was located at Section 8, Township 31 N, Range 10 W, on Highway AA, approximately one mile east of Highway 17 & 32.

The post-office was discontinued July 31, 1917. Thereafter it was supplied from Seymour. (--Missouri Manual, 1917-1918, p. 644.)

Ellsworth

The first hamlet in the county was located in Lynch Township, in 1837. It was a post-office in 1860. Named for an old pioneer who had a general store there before the (Civil) War. (--Place Names.)

Ellsworth was a post-office on Big Piney, ten miles north of Houston. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, Campbell, p. 620.)

It appears on a list of post-offices for 1856 and 1861. (--U. S. Postal Guide for those years.)

[9]

Embree

A post-office from 1899 to 1923 in Upton Township. Named for Tom Embree. (--Place Names.)

Eunice

A village in Carroll Township. A post-office since 1891. Named for Euncie, the wife of W. B. Cooper, first postmaster. (--Place Names.)

Eunice was located at Section 4, Township 29 N, Range 7 W, on Highways 17 & A.

Evansville

See Edanville. (Platbook of Texas Co.) (--Place Names.)

Evening Shade

A village in Roubidoux Township. A post-office since 1901. A name given the region by J. C. Davis because of the idyllic nature of the country side. (--Place Names.)

Also mentioned in a poem entitled "The Doomed Race," on page 124 of Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, Ramsay.

Fairview

Fairview was located on the Section line between Sections 17 & 20, Township 30 N, Range 11 W, on Highway 38, where it turns north.*

See, also, A Directory of Towns, Villages and Hamlets, etc. Taney Co., for a complete listing of other Fairviews in Missouri.

*Correction by Mrs. Louise Johnson.

Flat Rock

See Roubidoux. (--Place Names.)

Fourt's Mill

An early mill, located in what is now Clinton Township. Named for John J. and D. D. Fourt, who owned it. D. D. Fourt was an early county judge, and John was one of the first road commissioners. It was first known as Nesbitt's Mill, for the man who built the gin-mill. (--Place Names.)

[10]

Fowler

A village in Morris Township. A post-office from 1890 to 1923. Named for C. A. Fowler, merchant. (--Place Names.)

Fowler was located at Section 2, Township 29 N, Range 12 W, on Highway MM, south of the junction with AK. It was near the Wright County line.

Fruitville

Located in Morris Township. A post-office in 1895, named because an attempt was being made to promote the section as an apple and pear orchard region. (--Place Names.)

Graff

A discontinued post-office, (1896-1900) in Sargent Township. Named for Courtney Graff, who secured the office for the community. (--Place Names.)

Gravel Point

A discontinued post-office, (1876-1904) in Clinton Township. An early village which grew up at the point where gravel was taken from the West Piney Creek to make roads. (--Place Names.)

It was a post-office, eighteen miles southwest of Houston. (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 620.)

Grogan

A post-office in Southeast Case Township since 1899. Named for J. E. Grogan, on whose land it was established. Several other members of the same family live in adjoining tracts. (--Place Names.)

Grogan was located at Section 25, Township 29 N, Range 9 W, on an unmarked road, 1 mile east of Y, approximately 2 miles south of H.

Guild

Guild was a post-office from 1910 to 1928. Several residents remembered the post-office, but no one could offer an explanation. (--Place Names.)

Guild was approximately midway between Hattie and Arroll, in the southeast corner of the county. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.)

The post-office was discontinued, "in last three years," as of October 1, 1933. Thereafter it was supplied from Hattie. (--Missouri Manual, 1933-1934, p. 896.)

[11]

Hadley

Hadley was a post-office near the Phelps Co. line. (--Post Route Map of Missouri, issued by the Postmaster General, 1959.)

Hartshorn

It was located at Sections 25 & 26, 35 & 36, Township 30 N, Range 7 W, at the junction of Highways K & KK.*

*Correction by Mrs. Louise Johnson.

Hastings

See Success. (--Place Names.)

Hattie

Hattie was located at Section 23, Township 28 N, Range 8 W, south of Highway Y, and near N.

Hazleton

A village and discontinued post-office, (1891-1932) in Boone Township. Named from the mill which is an old land mark in the county. (--Place Names.)

Hazleton was approximately 5 miles northeast of Success. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.; Mrs. Louise Johnson.)

Hazleton Mill

In south central Boone Township. Merely the ruins or remains of a mill which was operated by J. Hazleton. (--Place Names.)

Hazleton Spring

In south central Boone Township. A large spring belonging originally to J. Hazleton, and named for him.

[12]

Hickory Springs or Spring

An early trading-post and post-office in Lynch Township. The store was opened about ten years before the Civil War. The place was a post-office in 1860, but it is now non-existent. Named for its location. (--Place Names.)

Hickory Springs was a post-office twenty-five miles southwest of Houston.* (--Gazetteer of Missouri, p. 620.)

It appears on a list of post-offices for 1856. (--U. S. Postal Guide, 1856.)

*Note: Mrs. Johnson said it could not have been there and still be in Lynch Township.

Houston

The county seat is located in Piney Township, in the geographical center of the county. The town was incorporated June 29, 1847, and postal service was extended the next January. The town was completely destroyed during the Civil War, but it was rebuilt as soon as the war was over. It was named in honor of Sam Houston (1793-1863), who was twice president of the independent state of Texas and U. S. Senator from Texas. He is chiefly remembered, however, as the hero of the Battle of San Jacinto in which he captured the Mexican General, Santa Anna and avenged the Alamo massacre and murders of Bowie and Davy Crockett. (--Place Names.)

Houston is located at Sections 7 & 18, Township 30 N, Range 10 W, at the junction of Highways 17, 63, T & F.

It appears on a list of post-offices in the U. S. Postal Guide, 1856.

Steffen's addition to Houston on the Southeast quarter of Southeast quarter of Section 6, Township 30, Range 9, was acknowledged by Josephine D. and Henry C. Steffens, September 22, 1886. But what may be termed the first addition -- Mineral Springs City -- was surveyed on the Southeast corner of the Northwest quarter of Southeast quarter, Section 30, Township 31, Range 9, for A. B. Blankenship and acknowledged by him October 2, 1880. (--State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., p. 477.)

See, also, Missouri Writer's Program, pp. 470, 471, for more information concerning Houston and Texas County.

Huggins

A village in Morris Township. A post-office since 1888. Named in honor of Francis M. Huggins, first postmaster, a justice of the peace and a merchant. (--Place Names.)

Huggins was on a line between Sections 12, Range 12 W, and Section 7, Range 11 W, Township 30 N, on Highway M.

[13]

Hurst

A village in Morris Township. A post-office from 1901 to 1921. Named for the Hurst family, who had a store there. (--Place Names. Note: Mrs. Johnson suggests that the name could have been spelled Hirsch.)

Hurst was approximately 1 mile south of Bado. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Impo (P. O.) for Dunn.

Impo, a post-office in Clinton Township since 1921. The name is a shortened form of Important, which was given the post-office when the Department refused to take the name of Dunn by which the settlement had been known. Only the post-office is known by Impo, the town still keeping the name of Dunn, which was the family name of the original settlers. (--Place Names.)

First mention of Impo post-office is made in Missouri Manual, 1921-1922, p. 900.)

It is shown on the following maps: Phillips 66 Oil Co., map of 1940; Barnsdahl Oil Co., map, date not known.

Indian Villages

There are six sites of former Indian Villages in the county, one at Chimney Rock and the others in the center and northwest portion of the county. The largest one is on the Roubidoux, in northwest Morris Township. (--Place Names.)

Jack's Fork

It appears on a list of post-offices for 1856. (--U. S. Postal Guide, 1856.)

Jack's Fork is a discontinued post-office, (1880-1902), in Pierce Township. Named for the River. (--Place Names.)

Kimble

A village in Sherrill Township. A post-office since 1899. Named for C. H. Kimble, who had the store there. (--Place Names.)

Kimble was located at Section 5, Township 33 N, Range 8 W, on Highway CC, approximately one and one-half miles east of Sherrill.*

*Correction by Mrs. Johnson.

[14]

Kinderpost

A village and discontinued post-office, (1910-1932) in Boone Township. Named by Columbus C. Bradford to signify that it was a place for children. Bradford, still living (1939), although blind, was a native of Texas County who went to the seminary and became a noted minister in Chicago. He wrote a book expounding a theory about souls asleep for which he was expelled from his pulpit. He returned to Texas County and established this town with the idea of being kind to children by getting them out of the city and onto little tracts of land. He was very sincere in the project, but it failed. Mr. Bradford is an extremely well educated man and would be familiar with German. The use of the German word in Kindergarten might have suggested the foreign word. (--Place Names.)

Kinderpost was located at Section 8, Township 33 N, Range 9 W, on Highway AT, north of Highway N.

Kinserlow

It was located in North Lynch Township, a post-office from 1910 to 1915. Named for Ike Kinserlow who had a mill there. (--Place Names.)

Note: Mrs. Johnson suggests that it was in southeast Lynch Township.

It was approximately one mile southwest of Oscar. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Kinserlow Mill

A mill which was operated by Ike Kinserlow on the Big Piney, but now abandoned. (--Place Names.)

Ladd

A village in Roubidoux Township. A post-office from 1893 to 1921. J. C. Davis, a Prohibitionist and preacher, named the office for his son, Ladd. (--Place Names.)

It was in the northwest part of the county, approximately one mile south of Pulaski Co. line, and approximately two miles east of Laclede Co. line. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.)

The post-office was discontinued as of October 1, 1923. Thereafter it was supplied from Evening Shade.

[15]

Licking

Licking was surveyed on Sections 6 & 7, Township 32, Range 8, and the record filed August 8, 1878. Collier's Third Addition was made in 1871.

The original survey was made by Jonathan Yates in 1857, and acknowledged by Mary Sherrill July 24 of that year. The location was on Southeast quarter of Southeast quarter of Section 6, Township 32 N, Range 8 W.

Licking takes its name from a Buffalo lick within one-quarter mile east, which was alive with deer up to 1835. As early as 1826 two men, John Baldridge and Barney Low, established their homes north by west of the lick. This Licking is at least twenty years older than Houston.

The first postmaster in the neighborhood was John Sherrill, the mail line being from Caledonia to Springfield. He was succeeded by E. G. Halbert, and he by A. H. Orchard, who in 1857-58 opened the first store; he was postmaster up to 1862, when he went to Rolla. (--State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., p. 485.)

Licking is a town in Sherrill Township, a post-office since 1860. The town was incorporated in 1878, but the country around was settled as early as 1826, by Joel Sherrill, William Thornton and Carter Baldridge. Boone and Paddies, two frontiersmen, had lived in the region for a time as early as 1816. Locally referred to as "The Lick," the town was named for a buffalo salt lick which is 1/4 mile east of town. (--Place Names.)

It is located at Sections 1, 12, 4, 7, Township 32 N, Range (on the line) between Ranges 8 & 9, on Highways 63 & 32.

It appears on a list of post-offices in 1856. (--U. S. Postal Guide, 1856.)

Log Cabin Park

In south central Sherrill Township. A Tourist supply post on Highway 63, so named because the filling station and sleeping cabins are constructed of Log Siding. (Tourist Map). (--Place Names.)

Lone Star Mill

An abandoned mill in Piney Township. Named because of its location near Houston; Texas Co. was named for the Lone Star State. The mill was used to supply electric power and light until the recent installation of more modern power plants in Houston. (--Place Names.)

[16]

Louisa

A village and abandoned post-office (1910-1922) in Pierce Township, named for the wife of Jim Embree, storekeeper and postmaster. (--Place Names.)

It was approximately one mile south of Stultz. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.)

The post-office was discontinued as of October 1, 1923. Thereafter it was supplied from Sargent. (--Missouri Manual, 1923-1924, p. 893.)

Lundy (formerly known as Maris Mill, q. v.)

A village and abandoned post-office (1892-1921) in southwest Piney Township. Named for John Lundy, who had a water mill there. (--Place Names.)

It was approximately one mile northeast of Bado, and about the same distance south of Clara. (--Map of Western States, Rand, McNally & Co., 1911.)

Mahan

A hamlet and abandoned post-office (1904-1915) in Upton Township. Named for Sam Mahon, whose wife was postmistress. (--Place Names.)

It was approximately one mile northeast of Upton and the same distance southwest of Ellis Prairie. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.)

Malone

An abandoned farmer's post-office (1909-1910) in Current Township. Named for P. Malone, a farmer who had the office in his home. (--Place Names.)

It was approximately midway between Sargent and Hattie, near the Howell Co. line. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.)

[17]

Maris Mill (later known as Lundy, q. v.)

On January 1, 1859, Nathan Jackson was granted the Northeast quarter of the Northwest quarter of Section 19, and the Southwest quarter of the Northwest quarter of Section 20, Township 30, Range 10 ...

On June 6, 1874, "4 acres more or less" were sold to a Mr. James Green. A mill was built on the site, probably by Mr. Green.

(Following several transactions, the site was sold to B. L. Maris. The original grist mill was on the site, (October 17, 1887.)

On July 9, 1891, Mr. Maris applied to Washington for a post-office, requesting that it be called "Maris Mill." The Post-Office Department declined the name, probably due to there being a post-office named "Morse Mill," in Jefferson County, Mo. The names were too similar. The post-office became Lundy on September 30, 1891 with Benjamin Lundy Maris as first postmaster. A house in the grove was the first post-office. A general store was across the road from the mill. This old road forded the creek alongside the mill and joined another country road on the other side. Today no trace can be seen on the other side.

Lundy and Maris Mill were on West Piney Creek, a short distance below where Hamilton Creek flows into it,, west of County Route Z, nine miles west of Houston. (--The Ozarks Mountaineer, Vol. 20, No. 2, March 1972, pp. 18-20. Copyright, used by permission.)

(Also spelled Lunday).

Maples

A village in Sherrill Township. A post-office since 1891. Named in honor of J. J. Maples, postmaster and merchant. (--Place Names.)

It was located at Sections 2 & 11, Township 32, North, Range 8 W, at the junction of Highways C & CC.

Marvin

A post-office in Current Township, in 1901. Named for Marvin Chapel. Location is unknown.) (--Place Names.)

Marvin Chapel was named for Bishop Enock Mather Marvin, the "Grand Old Man of Missouri Methodism." (--Our Storehouse of Missouri Place Names, Tamsay, p. 71.)

[18]

Meadow Farm

A post-office southwest of Summersville, apparently served from Willow Springs, (Howell Co.). (--Post Route Map of Missouri, 1959.)

Mineral Springs City

An addition to Houston in Piney Township which was named because of the presence of mineral springs. (--Place Names.)

Michell's Corner (also Mitchell's Store)

A highway store in Lynch Township. Named for the owner T. N. Mitchell. Also known as Blue Moon, a name given a dance hall built by the store. Blue Moon, the owner says, is a common name for dance halls, expressing the enchantment of the dance. (--Place Names. Mrs. Johnson.)

It was located at Section 7, Township 31 N, Range 10 W, at the junction of Highways AA, 17, & 32.

Midvale

It was located at Section 5, Township 29 N, Range 7 W, at the junction of Highways 17 & W.

Correction by Mrs. Johnson.

Montauk

It appears on a list of post-offices, in Postal Guide, 1856. It is now in Dent Co.

Mountain Store

A trading-post which stood a few miles east of the present Mountain Grove. After the Civil War, the site was moved across the county line into Wright County, and called Mountain Grove.

No trace is left of the old trading-post. (--Place Names.)

Nagle

A discontinued post-office, (1902-1925) in Ozark Township. Named for the family of C. H. Nagle, who owns land in the vicinity. (--Place Names.)

It was northwest of Arroll. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co. Mrs. Johnson.)

The office was discontinued as of November 1, 1927. Thereafter it was supplied from Grogan. (--Missouri Manual, 1927-1928, pp. 814-815.)

[19]

Montreal

Montreal, on the southeast quarter of Section 3, Township 28 N, Range 12 W, was surveyed in 1857, and on May 30, the plat was acknowledged by Samuel C. Hardin. A public square and several streets are shown on the plat. This old town was the only important one south of Houston up to the time of the Civil War. Mountain Grove and other railroad towns have long since taken its place. (--State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., p. 492.)

The Narrows

See Red Bank. (--Place Names.)

Nile

A discontinued post-office, (1892-1915) and trading post in Current Township. Named for the river in Egypt. Given the name possibly because it is on Big Creek. (--Place Names.)

It was near the Shannon County line, northeast of Raymondville and north of Hartshorn. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co., Mrs. Johnson.)

Nirvana

A discontinued post-office, (1891-1902) in Ozark Township. Named for the word which means the Buddhist heaven. The highest religious state which can be achieved, when all desire for existence is destroyed and the soul becomes one with its creator. Probably used here as a humorous name for a quiet place. (--Place Names.)

It was in the northeast corner of the county, near the Phelps, Dent & Texas County lines. (--Evening in Wisconsin Edition, Rand, McNally & Co., Atlas, 1896, p. 48.)

Odd

See Bucyrus. (--Place Names.)

Ormsby Mill

A saw-mill on the Big Piney, above Houston, owned and operated by John Ormsby in 1828; hence the name. Ormsby bought the mill from Thomas Cork who built it. (--Place Names.)

[20]

Oscar

A village and discontinued post-office, (1890-1915) in Jackson Township. Named by T. N. Bradford for his eldest son Oscar. Bradford was an important man politically in Texas Co. (--Place Names.)

It was located at Sections 4 & 5, Township 31 N, Range 8 W, on Highway 137 south of Licking.

The post-office was discontinued July 31, 1917. Thereafter it was supplied from Licking. (--Missouri Manual, 1917-1918, p. 644.)

Pettit's Mill

This saw-mill, on the Big Piney, was built in 1819, and named for its owner. It was probably the first in the county. (--Place Names.) (Location is unknown.)

Pinecrest

It was located at Section 24, Township 28 N, Range 7 W, on Highway 17, approximately one mile south of W.

Pinkston

A post-office in northeast Lynch Township in 1910. Named for Obe Pinkston, land owner in the neighborhood. In the plat book for 1931, it is misspelled Pirkston. (--Place Names.)

It was northeast of Success. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co., Mrs. Johnson.)

Pirkston

See Pinkston. (--Place Names.)

Plato

A village on Roubidoux Creek in Roubidoux Township. Established August 22, 1874, it has been a post-office since 1888. The office is listed in Godwin's in 1867, however. The town was named for Plato, the Athenian Philosopher, by John Largent, Ed Harris and William Cook. They planned an ideal community governed by thinking men, the type of Republic Plato described in his Republic. (--Place Names.)

Plato was surveyed at the northwest quarter of the northwest quarter of Section 11, Township 32 N, Range 12 W, and acknowledged by John and Eliza Largent, E. D. and Susanna Harris and William and Louisa Cook. (--State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., p. 489.)

[21]

Plato (Cont)

Plato is located at the junction of the old road past Turley and Highway 32. Plato, population 100, has a general store, a bank, other businesses and several homes. It is about six miles from the "ghost village" of Turley. (--The Ozarks Mountaineer, February, 1970, p. 15. Copyright, used by permission.)

Plato is located at Sections 2 & 11, Township 32 N, Range 12 W, on Highway 32, east of AH, near the Laclede County line.

It appears on a list of post-offices in U. S. Postal Guide, 1856.

Pleasant Ridge

Pleasant Ridge, 16 miles west of Houston, and 20 miles northeast of Mountain Grove, is the post-office center of that district. P. R. Worsham was postmaster in 1885. (--The State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., p. 492.)

Plum Valley

A discontinued post-office, (1867-1910) and trading-hamlet in Piney Township; now completely abandoned. Named by William Wilson, who found wild plums growing in the wilderness. He later planted more trees. (--Place Names.)

It appears on a list of post-offices in U. S. Postal Guide, 1856.

Prescott

A village in Lynch Township; a post-office since 1899. Named for Valentine Prescott, first postmaster. The post-office is now discontinued; probably in the 1930's (--Place Names; Mrs. Louise Johnson.)

It was located at Section 33, Township 32 N, Range 9 W, on an unmarked road west of Highway 63 and south of BB.

Raftville

A village in Lynch Township, a post-office from 1918 to 1935. So named because the village was the starting place for floating ties down the Big Piney River to the rail-head. (--Place Names.)

The post-office was discontinued "in past three years" as of October 1, 1933. Thereafter it was supplied from Licking. (--Missouri Manual, 1933-1934, p. 896.)

Raymondville

A village in Jackson Township which has been a post-office since 1876. Named by Joseph W. Brackett for his old home in Raymond, Mo. (--Place Names.)

[22]

Red Banks

Now called The Narrows, a very scenic section along the Piney, a deep, narrow cut in the clay hills. (--Place Names.) It is near Houston.

See page 471, Missouri Writer's Program, Missouri, -- American Guide Series, for more information.

Roby

A hamlet in Lynch Township which has been a post-office since 1888. Named for Cyrus H. Roby, merchant. (--Place Names.)

Roby was located at Section 3, Township 32 N, Range 11 W, at the junction of Highways 32 & 17.

Roubidoux (also spelled Robidoux, Roberdeau)

It is a village in Upton Township which has been a post-office since 1860. Named for the Roubidoux Creek which flows through the village. There is a deer lick at Roubidoux. The place is known locally as Flat Rock because of some large rocks along the creek bank.

(Roubidoux Creek is named for the Roubidoux family who pioneered in this section. The best known member of the family was Joseph, who founded the city of St. Joseph). (--Place Names.)

It is located at Section 4, Township 31 N, Range 11 W, on an unmarked Highway, approximately midway between M & AN, near Turley.

It appears on a list of post-offices in the U. S. Postal Guide, 1856.

Ruth

A post-office in Morris Township in 1876. Named for the first wife of J. M. Embree, a Tennessean who was prominent politically in the county. (--Place Names) (See Alice.)

Samoa

A village and discontinued post-office, (1891-1904) in Piney Township, named by Uriah L. Upton for Samoa in the South Seas, which had been made prominent by Robert Louis Stevenson's residence from 1889 to 1894. (--Place Names.) (Exact location is unknown.)

Sargent

A village and discontinued post-office, (1888-1932) in Sargent Township, originally called Stogsdill for the storekeeper; the name was changed to Sargent by the railroad to honor an official. (--Place Names.)

[23]

Sargent (Cont)

It was southeast of Cabool, on the (Gulf) now Frisco Railroad. It had a population of about 300, in 1889. (--State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., p. 491.)

It was located at Section 22, Township 28 N, Range 10 W, on Highway AV, southeast of Cabool.

The post-office was discontinued as of November 1, 1931. Thereafter it was supplied from Willow Springs. (--Missouri Manual, 1931-1932, p. 730.)

St. Anna (also spelled St. Annie)

A post-office at a private house in the eastern part of Laclede County. The office was located on the Texas-Pulaski County line, and has been listed in all three counties. Now the post-office is in Texas Co., and the Laclede Co. area is served by the Brownfield (q. v.) office in Laclede County. Obviously named for the mother of the Virgin. (--Place Names of Five Central Counties of Missouri, Anna O'Brien, B. S. in Ed., M. A. Theses.)

(See A Directory of Towns, Etc., Laclede County, Moser, for additional information.)

Saint Annie has been listed in three different counties. From 1897-1900, it was in Pulaski Co. (--Missouri Manuals, 1897-98, p. 429; 1899-1900 p. 428.)

Then it was in Laclede Co., 1901-1904. (--Missouri Manuals, 1901-1902, p. 391; 1903-1904, p. 462.)

Finally it was in Texas County, 1907-1910. (--Missouri Manuals, 1907-08, p. 481; 1909-10, p. 581.)

It was discontinued as of November 1, 1931. Thereafter it was supplied from Cookville. (--Missouri Manuals, 1931-32, p. 730.) Note: Cookville is one of the many towns now in the Fort Leonard Wood Military Reservation, and it is not possible to visit the area. (--Post Information Officer; Post Engineer, Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo.)

St. Anna

A discontinued post-office (1910-1932) in Roubidoux Township. Said to have been named by Bob Williams to honor his wife, Anna, who had died. The place of course is really named for St. Ann or Anna, the mother of the Virgin, and Mrs. Anna Williams was honored indirectly by the honor paid to her patron of "name" saint. (--Place Names.)

[24]

Sherrill

A village in Sherrill Township which has been a post-office since 1874. Named for the township. (--Place Names.)

It was located at Section 1, Township 32 N, Range 9 W, on Highway CC, (old 63), now 1 mile west of the new Highway 63, near the Phelps Co. line. (--Additional information by Mrs. Johnson.)

Sillyman's Store

A trading-point in Lynch Township. Named for Dr. John Sillyman, who owns the store and who claims to have a cancer cure. (--Place Names.)

It was on Highway 17. (--Mrs. Johnson.)

Slabtown Spring (Location is unknown.)

In Boone Township. Named for the lumbering industry which prospered there in the early days of railroad building. A camp for the making of railroad ties was located at the spring. (--Place Names.)

Simmons

Simmons is located at Section 3, Township 29 N, Range 10 W, at the junction of Highways 63 & YY.

Solo

A hamlet in Cass Township. So named by R. A. Lily, storekeeper, because of its remoteness. (--Place Names.)

It is located at Section 5, Township 29 N, Range 9 W, at the south end of Highway UU, east of 63.

Stanford

It appears on a list of post-offices in Postal Guide, 1861.

A discontinued post-office, (1860-1902) in Cass Township. Named for Stanford Wommack, the first postmaster. (--Place Names.) (Exact location is unknown.)

Stogsdill

See Sargent. (--Place Names.)

[25]

Stouse's Mill

An old mill in Cass Township, named for the family who built it and operated it. (Not in use, now, (1939)). (--Place Names.)

Stultz

A village in Cass Township, a post-office from 1888 to the present, (1939). Named for Lamech Stultz, an early settler. (--Place Names.)

It was located at Section 20, Township 29 N, Range 9 W, approximately one-half mile south, on an unmarked road, of Highway H.

Success or Hastings

Success, 14 miles west of Houston and 30 miles northeast of Mountain Grove, was settled in 1880 ... In 1885 T. J. Hamrick was postmaster, W. B. Langley was general merchant and hotel proprietor, W. D. Fansler, druggist, were some of the businessmen. (--State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., p. 492.)

A village in Lynch Township. Settled in 1880, it has been a post-office since 1883. The town has been in several locations in the neighborhood. It was first called Hastings, for the storekeeper. He took a partner, Bender, and because there was an unusual spring near the place, Ebbing Spring, they decided to make a resort of it. They gave the name Success, probably for advertising purposes. Recently, (as of 1939) the town was moved again, this time to the junction of two highways (17 & 32) and renamed Wye City. (q.v.)**, by Ransom D. Lynch because of the shape of the town. The post-office, however, retains the name of Success. (--Place Names.)

**Mrs. Louise Johnson said that the name "Wye City" did not 'stick' and the name reverted to Success.

Success is located at Section 25, Township 32 N, Range 11 W, on Highway 17, where 17 continues south.

Success Spring

A spring in Lynch Township. Named for the town, which was once close by, but has been moved about five miles to the highway town of Wye City, (q.v.). An old name for the spring is Ebbing Spring, which describes the quiet manner in which the large spring issues from the ledge. (--Place Names.)

Sullen's Mill

A saw mill built on the Big Piney about 1820. Named for the family who built and operated it. (--Place Names.) (Location is unknown.)

[26]

Summersville

The town of Summersville was platted on Section 24, Township 29 N, Range 7 W ... February 1, 1870. (--State of Missouri, History of Texas Co., p. 490.)

A village in Carroll Township which has been a post-office since 1874. Named for Jesse and Thomas Summer, early settlers at the townsite. (--Place Names.)

Summersville is located at Section 24, Township 29 N, Range 7 W, on Highways 17, JJ, 106, on the county line between Texas and Shannon Counties.

Theron

A discontinued post-office, (1921-1926) about whose name nothing could be learned. (--Place Names.)

The post-office was discontinued as of November 1, 1927. Thereafter it was supplied from Bucyrus. (--Missouri Manual, 1927-1928, pp. 815-816.) (Location is unknown.)

Truesdale Mill

An early saw mill built a few miles north of Houston before 1828. Named for its owner and builder. (--Place Names.) (Exact location is unknown.)

Turley

A village in Upton Township, a post-office since 1889, named by Tom Embree, who was postmaster, for his son, Turley. (--Place Names.)

A grist mill has stood here on Roubidoux Creek, since before the Civil War. The mill operated until 1900, with power furnished by a large over-shot wheel. Later a steam boiler was installed. The boiler now lies within the stone foundations of a building back of the mill. It is rusty and almost covered with the remains of the roof and walls of the shelter which protected it when it was operating.

Late in the fall of 1935, the mill ceased operation. The day of store bought bread and feed from competitive, larger feed mills had arrived.

The first church in the area was established in 1846. Jim Embree named the village Turley, after his son, Thomas Turley Embree and Turley it became in the U. S. Post-Office records. Jim Embree became the first postmaster. The office existed until the 1930's.

There is an old store building with some merchandise still standing. At one time there was a doctor's office and a drug store. Both have long since been torn down. A few abandoned buildings remain.

[27]

Turley (Cont)

The site may be located thus: Two miles north of Success, on M, left three and one-half miles, to an unmarked gravel road on the right, passing an old rural school house, then a church and one home. A quarter mile further on , the site of Turley is reached. It is about one mile from "M". (--The Ozarks Mountaineer, February, 1970, pp. 14 & 15. Copyright, used by permission.)

Turley is located at Section 30, Township 32 N, Range 11 W, northwest of Highway M.

Tyrone

A village in Cass Township which has been a post-office since 1892. Named by Jeremiah Smook for his home town of Tyrone, Pennsylvania. According to Gannett, the Pennsylvania town was named for the county in Ireland. (--Place Names.)

Tyrone was located at Section 12, Township 29 N, Range 9 W, on Highway H, approximately one mile west of DD.

Upton

A village in Upton Township which has been a post-office since 1910. Named for Osias Upton, early settler and merchant. (--Place Names.)

It was located at Section 29, Township 31 N, Range 11 W, on Highway FF, southeast of MM.

Vada

A village in Lynch Township, a post-office from 1918 to 1929. The name is a shortened form of Nevada Jackson, the postmaster's daughter. (--Place Names.) (Exact location is unknown.)

The post-office was discontinued as of November 1, 1931. Thereafter it was supplied from Success. (--Missouri Manual, 1931-32, p. 370.)

Varvel

A discontinued post-office, (1892-1904) in Sargent Township. Named for a family who had the office in their general store. (--Place Names.) (Exact location is unknown.)

Venable

A village and discontinued post-office, (1892-1921), in Lynch Township. Named for P. S. Venable, who had the post-office. (--Place Names.)

It was approximately one mile southeast of Ellis Prairie. (--Map of Western States, 1911, Rand, McNally & Co.)

The post-office was discontinued July 31, 1917. Thereafter it was supplied from Houston. (--Missouri Manual, 1917-1918, p. 644.)

[28]

Ware Mill

A saw-mill built near Licking in the 1830's. Named for its owner who bought the mill from C. Baldridge, an old settler who built it. (--Place Names.)

Wye City

A village in northeast Upton Township incorporated in April 1933. The land site was given by Dr. Ransom D. Lynch. It superceded Success, (q.v.). Named because the town is laid out at the junction of Highways 17 & 32 which form a "Y". The dedication of streets and alleys is on file in the court house and the abstractor's office in Houston. Highway markers are still inscribed Success. This may be only a change on paper, because R. D. Lynch died "last winter" and it was his development. (--Place Names.)

In connection with the above statement, Mrs. Louise Johnson makes the following statement: "Sometimes called the 'Wye,' but is listed as Success. Former site of the town is designated as 'Old Success.' Now mostly a ghost town."

Yukon

A village in Ozark Township which has been a post-office since 1900. The postmaster, Shelby Dial, called a meeting of the farmers of the community to select a name for the office. Ben Castleman suggested Yukon. The name was then prominent because of the discovery of gold in Alaska along the Yukon River in 1898. (--Place Names.)

Yukon is located at Sections 29 & 30, Township 30 N, Range 8 W, on Highways 137, 17 & P, south of Raymondville.


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