Volume 9 , Number 9 , Fall 1987


A TRIP FROM CHADWICK TO FORSYTH IN 1900

Contributed by Bob Gilmore


A TRIP FROM CHADWICK TO FORSYTH IN 1900

Contributed by Bob Gilmore

(The Foriyth and Chadwick hack line made a round trip every day to give Forsyth citizens access to the rail head at Chadwick. The one-way fare was $1.50, a round trip, $2.50. This report from an Illinois editor who had made the trip was reprinted in the Taney County Republican, March 1, 1900.)

In Chadwick we were somewhat disappointed on account of the size of the place. There were not more than 150 people in the village and the leading hotel like the other buildings is a one story frame board roof. However the dinner we received was as good as you will find in any of the two dollar per day hotels and this is true of all the hotels in that country. They feed welil

By stage line we left Chadwick at one-thirty and to be exact we travelled a distance of 24.37. miles over rough and rocky road to Forsyth, county: seat of Taney County. This drive consumed a little more than five hours time and the entire distance hasn’t a single bridge or half mile of dirt road and we crossed and recrossed Swan Creek seven times. On the way from Chadwick to Forsyth we passed several little hamlets and crossroad stores where the good people of the county congregate from time to time to discuss politics and whistle.

Forsyth is the county seat of Taney County. The place has a population of about 400, as intelligent, sociable, and hospitable people as we ever met.... The county possesses many good schools and churches and the principles and teachings of these are noticeable. Of course, the people are not all angels, nor are the habits of life measured strictly by golden rule but they are good people and will treat you right notwithstanding the fact that their greatest inconsistency seems to be in trying to assimilate McKinley prosperity and corn whiskey. For in Taney County they make corn whiskey and vote the Republican ticket....

While the county is not conveniently adapted to agriculture, still there is scarcely 160 acres in the entire county that hasn’t on it 15 or more acres of tillable land.

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