BRIEF SKETCH OF EARLY HISTORY OF THE GRAVE YARD IN THE SOUTH WEST CORNER OF OZARK COUNTY, MO.
By S. C. Turnbo


On the south side of White River in the Southwest corner of Ozark County, Mo. opposite the Panther Bottom is an old burying place of the dead. This grave yard is in a field and is marked by a small grove of timber and is situated on a fine plot of ground on the second bank of the river between two small hollows. This ground was selected by Cage Hogan for the interment of his son George Hogan who died on the 28th of April 1850, and was the first buried here. Mr. Hogan and Aunt Polly his wife placed a native stone at the head of their sons grave with name and date of his death carved on it. Enoch Fishers wife was the second interment here; she died soon after George Hogan did. These were the only two graves here when my parents moved to the farm just above here in the fall of 1853. This old time grave yard calls to mind an epidemic of pneumonia which spread among the settlers who lived on the river. It broke out in January 1858 and lasted until the middle of February before it released its grip on the people. But before it died out it took away many people. Martin Johnson made 11 coffins at our house during this fatal spell of winter fever. The eleven bodies that Mr. Johnson made coffins for were all buried in this grave yard. Among the dead was my brother Newton Jefferson Turnbo who died on the 13 of February of that year. Among the names of people who have died and are buried here that we have not mentioned in other chapters is Mrs. Elmira Magness widow of Sam Magness and a sister of the writers mother. Two of her daughters Eliza and Patsey also rest here.

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