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Oktoberfest: Beer and Brewing

Meet me in Munich : a beer lover's guide to Oktoberfest, Moses Wolff Munich’s Oktoberfest is one of the most famous events in Germany. It is a beer drinker’s paradise—over the course of sixteen days, more than six million visitors consume nearly two million gallons of specially brewed Oktoberfest beer. For the first-time visitor to the Wies’n (a meadow near Munich’s center dedicated to the festival), Oktoberfest can be a little overwhelming. Fortunately, Moses Wolff hasn’t missed a day of Oktoberfest in years, and he knows the festival like the back of his hand.

 

A year in food and beer recipes and beerpairings for every season, Emily Baime and Darin Michaels Beer and food pairing can be as much an art form as wine and food pairing. With the explosion in craft beers and interest in seasonal cuisine, A Year in Food and Beer perfectly fills a niche. It instructs readers how to identify flavors in specific American and European-style beers and how to complement those with gourmet foods and cooking techniques by season. Home cooks, beer drinkers, and curious foodies will be fortified learning about beer and breweries and sampling the 40 enticing recipes and more than 100 beer-pairing suggestions.

 

Brewing better beer : master lessons for advanced home brewers, Gordon Strong Brewing Better Beer is a comprehensive look at technical, practical and creative homebrewing advice from Gordon Strong, three-time winner of the coveted National Homebrew Competition Ninkasi Award. Provides advanced instruction for homebrewers, with advice for entering competitions and twenty-three recipes.

 

 

True brews : how to craft fermented cider, beer, wine, sake, soda, mead, kefir, and kombucha at home, Emma Christensen An accessible homebrew guide for alcoholic and non-alcoholic fermented drinks, including beer, mead, soda, kefir, kombucha, hard cider, sake, and fruit wines. You can make naturally fermented sodas, tend batches of kombucha, and brew your own beer in the smallest apartment kitchen with little more equipment than a soup pot, a plastic bucket, and a long-handled spoon. All you need is the know-how.  

 


The United States of beer : a freewheeling history of the all-American drink, Dane Huckelbridge A history of beer in America by the author of Bourbon Chronicles how beer has evolved in every nation from a regional product to a global mega-brand, sharing anecdotes about such subjects as Washington's failed attempt to brew molasses at Mount Vernon and the manufacturing technologies that introduced beer to the Wild West

 

 

National Geographic atlas of beer : a globe-trotting journey through the world of beer, Nancy Hoalst-Pullen & Mark W. Patterson This illustrated beer atlas includes more beers and more countries than many books of its kind. Includes beerrecommendations from Garrett Oliver, the renowned brewmaster of Brooklyn Brewery, and written by "beergeographers" Nancy Hoalst-Pullen and Mark Patterson, this guide features more than 100 maps and 200 color photos. You'll find beer history, trends, and tasting across six continents (and how to order a beer in 14 languages!). Travel tips include the best breweries, beer festivals, and pubs in each location.

 

The complete beer course : boot camp for beer geeks: from novice to expert in twelve tasting classes, Joshua M. Bernstein It's a great time to be a beer drinker, but also the most confusing, thanks to the dizzying array of available draft beers. Expert Joshua M. Bernstein demystifying brews and breaking down the elements that make beer's flavor spin into distinctively different and delicious directions. Structured around a series of easy-to-follow classes, his course hops from lagers and pilsners to hazy wheat beers, Belgian-style abbey and Trappist ales, aromatic pale ales and bitter IPAs, roasty stouts, barrel-aged brews, belly-warming barley wines, and mouth-puckering sour ales. There is even a class on international beer styles and another on pairing beer with food and starting your own beer cellar. Through suggested, targeted tastings, you'll learn when to drink down-and when to dump those beers down a drain.

 

The brewer's tale : a history of the world according to beer, William Bostwick Presents the five thousand-year history of beer, from Babylonian temple workers and Nordic shamans to Belgian monks and American patriots, and the author discusses his own attempts to replicate some ancient brews. A beer-filled journey into the past: the story of brewers gone by and one brave writer’s quest to bring them?and their ancient, forgotten beers?back to life, one taste at a time. This is the story of the world according to beer, a toast to flavors born of necessity and place?in Belgian monasteries, rundown farmhouses, and the basement nanobrewery next door. So pull up a barstool and raise a glass to 5,000 years of fermented magic.

 

Craft beer for the homebrewer : recipes from America's top brewmasters, Michael Agnew As the craft beer craze continues to sweep the nation, more and more people are deciding to try their hand at creating their own perfect brew. Agnew presents dozens of recipes adapted by craft brewmasters for the homebrewer to make in his or her own kitchen, basement, garage, or patio. Based on the actual production beers of featured microbreweries, these recipes cover the entire range of beer styles--ambers and pales, IPAs, stouts and porters, Irish and Scottish ales, Belgians, and wheats--representing craft breweries from across the United States. Each recipe is accompanied by full-color photography, an ingredient list, instructions for both the mash and extract brewer, and historical and anecdotal notes about the brewery that provided it.

 

Experimental homebrewing : mad science in the pursuit of great beer, Drew Beechum and Denny Conn When most brewers think of an experimental beer, odd creations come to mind. And sure, in this book you can learn how to brew with ingredients like bacon, chanterelle mushrooms, defatted cacao nibs, and peanut butter powder. However, experimental homebrewing is more than that. It's about making good beer--the best beer, in fact. It's about tweaking process, designing solid recipes, and blind evaluations. So put on your goggles, step inside the lab, and learn from two of the craziest scientists around: Drew Beechum and Denny Conn. Get your hands dirty and tackle a money-saving project or try your hand at an off-the-wall technique. Freeze yourself an Eisbeer, make a batch of canned starter wort, fake a cask ale, extract flavors with distillation, or sit down at the microscope and do some yeast cell counting. More than 30 recipes and a full chapter of open-ended experiments will complete your transformation. Before you realize it, you'll be donning a white lab coat and sharing your own delicious result

 

 

 

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