Search Options

KIDS

PARENT BLOG

Write a Letter Together!

By Jennifer at the Fair Grove Branch Library

Letter writing is a wonderful way to teach your child communication while also modeling gratitude and friendship. While a lot of messages are communicated electronically, a handwritten letter is a way to show someone how much you miss or appreciate them. You can send the letter through the mail or write a nice card to give to someone nearby. Help your child brainstorm the kind of letter they want to write. Thank you notes are a great way to thank someone who has done something nice for you. Maybe you were at a business or event and received exceptional service. Help your child write them a note of appreciation. An informational letter is a great way to hone those narrative skills. You can also simply check in with a relative or friend to let them know what is new in your world and share your thoughts and feelings with another person. There is also the complaint letter. In the humorous story, “The Day the Crayons Quit,” the crayons write separate letters of complaint. It is important for your child to know this is a way they can express displeasure over something. A humorous video of some of your favorite Springfield-Greene County librarians retelling of The Day the Crayons Quit will be available as a video on the Kids page until June 30.

Books that tell stories using letters or documents are called epistolary literature. Check out some of these picture books to see what we mean!

book jacketCan I Be Your Dog? by Troy Cummings

book jacketThe Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt and illustrated by Oliver Jeffers

book jacketDear Dragon by Josh Funk and illustrated by Rodolfo Montalvo

book jacketXO, OX: A Love Story by Adam Rex and illustrated by Scott Campbell

For families with tweens, listen to the Springfield-Greene County Library Podcast, Planet Book. In episode 9 that dropped on March 11, youth staffer Iggi talks about epistolary fiction and recommends some reads for middle school students.

Questions or need more ideas? Email imagine@thelibrary.org