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History & Biography 

A Date Which Will Live in Infamy

On December 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor was attacked by the Japanese. The U.S. Pacific Fleet was crippled, over 2400 were dead and most airplanes on the ground were destroyed. This attack brought the United States into World War II.

You can read or listen to President Franklin D. Roosevelt's speech given on December 8, 1941 at historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5166/.

Explore National Geographic's Remembering Pearl Harbor website, which includes timelines, books, maps and newsletters about the infamous attack that spurred the United States to enter the war.

The Library has many books and DVDs about the attack under the subject  Pearl Harbor Attack on 1941 in the Library's catalog.

Here are just a few:

Non-Fiction:

At Dawn We Slept: The Untold Story of Pearl Harbor by Gordon W. Prange in collaboration with Donald M. Goldstein and Katherine V. Dillon.

 

 

 

Pearl Harbor: FDR Leads the Nation into War by Steven M. Gillon.

 

 

 

 

Fiction:

 Pearl Harbor: A Novel of December 8th. Book one, The Pacific War Series by Newt Gingrich and William R. Forstchen.

 

 

 

Biography:

Radioman: An Eyewitness Account of Pearl Harbor and WWII in the Pacific edited by Carol Edgemon Hipperson.

 

 

 

DVD:

Pearl Harbor

Is the historical portrayal of the attack on Pearl Harbor as seen in movies accurate? Author, Dr. Donald Goldstein, leads a team of producers on a site survey of Pearl Harbor to revisit the attack and the lucky shot that sunk the USS Arizona on December 7, 1941. Weaving together interviews with survivors who share their stories from that fateful day, and computer animation, the Pearl Harbor attack is re-created, as one of the most significant and traumatic events in American history.


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